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Becca199212 Becca199212 is offline
Posted 20th November 2008, 04:10 PM
Join Date: May 2007
Location: North East England.
Posts: 822

Chinese Owl


The Chinese Owl


Difficulty: A good breed for beginners the Chinese owl doesn’t require much work and are very rewarding.
Diet: because of their small beaks, they cannot eat the larger seeds (peas and the large black sunflower seeds) and so a tumbler or roller mix is preferred as so none goes to waste.
Cost: The cost varies depending on the quality of bird you are buying and who you are buying it from. The breed is readily available in the UK and so is relatively cheap compared to some of the other breeds.

History

The breeds’ origin is uncertain, but it is considered that they are probably descended from the Spanish Chorrera, however this must be a distant descendant as today the breeds have grown apart. Although you might expect the breed to have originated in China, this is untrue, where it did originate is not known for certain but Spain and India are likely. A French pigeon dealer by the name of Destriveaux had them in Paris, France. The name Chinese Owl was crafted by the French pigeon dealer. He sold some "Chinese Owls" to King Prosche of Germany in 1865. The King bred them his entire life and was instrumental in the development of this unique owl breed. Today you can find Chinese Owl breeders all over the world. However, Germany is credited with the early development of the breed.

A Spanish Chorrera, you can see the resemblance with the breast feathers and neck frills, the Chorreras are slightly larger than a Chinese Owls.
[IMGhttp://static.keebali.com/pigeons.biz/gallery/files/1/3/6/chinowl3.jpg][/IMG]
A Chinese Owl which has very loose feathers on its back which are similar to those on a Chorrera.

Characteristics

The Owl Pigeons are noted for their very short beaks and rounded heads. They also have a fairly large body. Due to the shortness of the beak many of the owl breeds have trouble feeding their young. The Chinese has a longer beak than the other Owls and therefore are more likely to feed its own young. Like many fancy breeds they are heavily feathered around the vent, to ensure higher fertility I recommend trimming the vent area during the mating season.
I have found that the cocks are very territorial birds and do best when they have their own breeding area away from other pairs. The hens are passive and appear to enjoy human company.
The breed can be free flown; they fly fairly well, although if you want to show them it is advisable to keep them in the loft as the breast feathers are easily spoiled.


Young Chinese owls, you can see they have a dainty beak and the difference in the way their feathering comes in (from either side which is the beginning of neck frill) opposed to ferals or other breeds with ‘normal’ feathering.

A very protective cock keeping an eye out for the evil human with a camera.
__________________
When angels visit us,
we do not hear the rustle of wings,
nor feel the feathery touch of the breast of a dove;
but we know their presence by the love they create in our hearts.

-Mary Eddy Backer (1821-1910)




Becca

Last edited by Becca199212; 20th November 2008 at 04:13 PM..
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Becca199212's Avatar
Becca199212 Becca199212 is offline
Posted 20th November 2008, 04:15 PM
Join Date: May 2007
Location: North East England.
Posts: 822

Description, Standard, And Disqualifications


Description and Standard

They are medium sized birds with fairly abundant feathering and a frill of feathers on the front of the thighs. A distinct frill (also called whiskers) begins on the chest and runs up to the sides of the cheeks.
Head should be arched from back of the beak, forming a smooth profile. Width equally proportioned. Should be bold in appearance.

Eye alert and clear. Bull in white, red or red-orange in colour birds. Any colour in pied or any other colour, except split, cracked or one of each colour not permissible. Eye cere fine and smooth, following the contour of eye. Dark colour in black, blue and checked. Light shade in other colours, but flesh in white.

Neck should be short, rather thick at shoulder tapering to back of head forming a smooth profile. Gullet should be well developed, commencing at the tip of the lower mandible and terminating at the top of breast frill.

Beak: Dainty, yet large enough to distinguish it from the African Owl. Color for blacks, blues and blue checks - black: For silvers, silver duns, duns and silver checks - light horn color: For reds, yellows and whites - flesh colour.

The beak should be set at a 120 degree angle with the forepart of the head and large enough to feed their young.

Wattle should be fine in texture, neat and heart shaped.

Neck Frill: A smooth and even collar of reversed feathers fitting loosely in relation to the neck, breaking behind the head in a vertical line leaving no less than 1 /4 inch gap on the back of the head. Should be as high as the lower part of the eye cere.

Breast Frill: A profuse display of reversed feathers completely covering the breast, directing feathers up to the neck frill and down towards the pantaloons. Breast frill should cover forepart of wing down to pantaloons, including the wing butts. Should be proportional on both sides.

Two large distinct puffs of fine feathers should protrude from the lower breast in front of the legs.

The bird should be bold, alert and upright; the eye is perpendicular on a line above the ball of the foot, the breast thrown out prominently; balance in length, height and width, with all these qualities giving the bird grace in composition, movement, and expression. Cocks should measure about 10 inches from beak to tip of tail, eight inches from the floor to crown of the head. Cocks should weight 10 ounces. Hens should weigh 8 ounces.
Wing feathers should be smooth and the flights should be tight, resting on the tail, with tips nearly meeting. Secondary feathers are to be smooth over the back. The tail should be fairly narrow and carried just clear of the floor. The tail should consist of no more than 12 feathers; however points will be lost for over-plucking.

Legs are short and coloured bright red, but long enough to give grace to the carriage. Be free of feathers below the hock. Feet should be rather small and neat. Toes well spread apart.

Disqualifications:

* Forked or split tail.
* Birds out of condition at the discretion of the judge.
* Split or cracked eyes or one of each colour.
* Excessive trimming or plucking.
* Red eye cere birds.
* Grouse legs or excessive feathers below the leg joint.
* A Chinese Owl possessing African Owl - type head, which is in reference to the extremely short beak setting


A black Chinese Owl standing correctly- it’s rather hard to see as the photo cuts off the birds tail but they should stand with their tail pointing downwards, below their wings and not far from touching the ground.

Another black Chinese Owl, on this photo you can see the division between the breast feathers and the puffs of feathering on the legs.
__________________
When angels visit us,
we do not hear the rustle of wings,
nor feel the feathery touch of the breast of a dove;
but we know their presence by the love they create in our hearts.

-Mary Eddy Backer (1821-1910)




Becca

Last edited by Becca199212; 20th November 2008 at 04:18 PM..
Becca199212's Avatar
Becca199212 Becca199212 is offline
Posted 20th November 2008, 04:19 PM
Join Date: May 2007
Location: North East England.
Posts: 822

Show Preparation And Links


Show preparation

The hardest part of show preparation is getting the breast and neck frill to ‘bloom’. I have found the best way to do this is to blow dry the breast feathers, using a low heat setting, the feathers appear to lie nicer when blow dried.
A good diet in the run up to a show is vital, if your birds aren’t looking alert and at their best the judges will not be impressed. Cage training is also very important- judges will not judge a bird they cannot catch. The birds should be relaxed in a show situation and should definitely not struggle to get out of the cage or away from the judges. To cage train successfully a young bird ought to be put in the cage for a short period of time each week. I start training once the young bird has been banded and for the first few cage sessions I put the young in the cage with their parent, gradually moving the parent to the next cage along and away altogether.



Links

http://www.feathersite.com/Poultry/P...s/BRKOwls.html Good photos although the information isn’t too good.
http://www.chineseowl.com/ Brilliant website, dedicate to the breed.
http://wwingsaviary.lbbhost.com/Pige...hineseOwl.html Brilliant website for information and good quality photos. Also includes colour standards for the breed.
http://aviangems.com/NCOC/index.htm The national Chinese Owl club of America and Canada.
http://www.azpigeons.org/botm-chineseowl.htm Some more history on the breed.
http://www.pigeons.biz/gallery/brows...p?c=89&userid= Chinese Owl photos.
__________________
When angels visit us,
we do not hear the rustle of wings,
nor feel the feathery touch of the breast of a dove;
but we know their presence by the love they create in our hearts.

-Mary Eddy Backer (1821-1910)




Becca
 
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