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altgirl35 altgirl35 is offline
Posted 23rd August 2010, 12:40 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by doveone52 View Post
I have hummers and goldfinches, too. Love those little guys! The gold finches dart and play all day on the feeders.
me 2!! i have thistle socks for the goldfinches they come year round. soo cute, i have rehabb the babies, they are sooo adorable
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doveone52 doveone52 is offline
Posted 23rd August 2010, 01:06 PM
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Originally Posted by altgirl35 View Post
me 2!! i have thistle socks for the goldfinches they come year round. soo cute, i have rehabb the babies, they are sooo adorable
Oh, wow! I would be in heaven with goldfinch babies!
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Jay3 Jay3 is offline
Posted 23rd August 2010, 01:31 PM
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Originally Posted by altgirl35 View Post
me 2!! i have thistle socks for the goldfinches they come year round. soo cute, i have rehabb the babies, they are sooo adorable
Mine like the thistle, but will also go to the black oil sunflower feeders as well. They're so pretty. Babies are so tiny. Must be interesting to rehab them.
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george simon george simon is offline
Posted 23rd August 2010, 08:03 PM
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POX IS A VIRUS and there is no antibiotic to cure it it will run its course about 2-3 weeks after which the bird will have a life time of immunetyTHE POX MARKS ON THIS BIRD ARE ON THE FEET AND THAT IS MUCH BETTER THEN AROUND THE EYES OR IN THE MOUTH.. yOUNG IN THE NEST HAVE A DIFFERCULT TIME AS THEY LACK THE FEATHERS AND THERE FOR GET THE POX ALL OVER THEIR BODY. GEORGE
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altgirl35 altgirl35 is offline
Posted 24th August 2010, 04:27 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Jay3 View Post
Mine like the thistle, but will also go to the black oil sunflower feeders as well. They're so pretty. Babies are so tiny. Must be interesting to rehab them.
oh they are, they make that cute little beep beep beep noise you hear outside and sort of bob with each peep, i love birdie hungry dances
sorry to hijack!
Bella_F Bella_F is offline
Posted 28th August 2010, 10:52 PM
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Update


Hi everyone, and thanks for your replies!

Well, I didn't have the heart to stop feeding him; I have been very close to this little one since he was born, so the sicker he became, the closer he stayed to me. He started to roost in our yard at night (instea dof flying off to the communal roosts a few miles away) and spend most of his time hiding or feeding on the ground or in the trees within 20 meters or so of my back door. He got to the point where he was camped outside my back door in the mornings, and he'd wiggle his wings and holler at me whenever he saw me (but then scurry away shyly when I came too close).

Because he was so dependent, I was able to mostly feed him separately to the flock several times a day. I changed his food from only dog kibble to a combination of kibble and lamb hearts.

During the last two days, he started to look noticeable weaker in the mornings, and was having difficultly flying - he could only lift himself into a low branch if he was terrified, and he was stumbling a lot. But after a few meals of lamb hearts during the morning , he'd pick up and then fly around normally during the afternoons. I thought he might make it.

Unfortunately, he stopped eating yesterday afternoon around 3pm. I gave him a really nice meal of lamb hearts and minced beef, which he ate slowly, then he flew onto the bird bath and had a nice drink of water. When he thought I wasn't looking he flew into the tree where he was born, and didn't come down again.

This morning the other crows have been really freaked out and keep flying up to the tree where he was, looking at the ground and yelling. There were about 50 of them today coming in and making a huge racket every few hours or so. I have only seen them do this when they see another dead crow from their group; I am pretty sure its the sick one and that he didn't make it the night.

I spent he day looking out for him, and leaving treats around where he'd normally come and eat them. But there's been no sign of him. I am pretty sure he passed away
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Jay3 Jay3 is offline
Posted 28th August 2010, 11:11 PM
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I am so sorry if that is what happened to him. Would have been better if you could have brought him in and cared for him through this illness. Really sorry.
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Bella_F Bella_F is offline
Posted 28th August 2010, 11:56 PM
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Originally Posted by Jay3 View Post
I am so sorry if that is what happened to him. Would have been better if you could have brought him in and cared for him through this illness. Really sorry.
Hi Jay!

This one could still fly so capture wasn't an option.

But last year, there was a pox-infected juvenile crow here that I did take in when it could no longer fly. By morning he couldn't stand or eat by himself. I only manged to keep him alive for two days, and I sometimes think it would have been better to have just left him to die in peace, without all that stress of being chased & betrayed by someone he trusted, and then living in a state of terror for two days while I handled him.

When wild birds are dying, they usually know it, and they will time their death to happen during their sleep. When humans intervene, we can sometimes prolong their pain and fear, and they die whilst fully aware because of the forced feeding. I hope that will never happen to me again- its horrible

Last edited by Bella_F; 28th August 2010 at 11:59 PM..
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Jay3 Jay3 is offline
Posted 29th August 2010, 09:49 AM
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Hi Bella, I understand how you feel, but I don't agree that it would have been better for you to have left that other crow outside to die. Many of us have captured and treated wild birds, and later been able to release them to have another chance at life. Your trying to help him was the right thing to do. It's just that sometimes, it's just too late for them by the time we get them, and nothing we can do will save them. It was still better that he died inside, rather than out there where he would have been an easy target for predators.
And trying to give them a chance to recover and then be released back to their life when we can, is better than not trying at all. Sometimes we just can't change what is to be, but I feel that we still need to try. It hurts us when we lose them, but that isn't important. What is important is that we tried for them.
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altgirl35 altgirl35 is offline
Posted 29th August 2010, 06:37 PM
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oh bella i'm so sorry to hear this, the poor little guy, i hope you can find his body, i would keep looking, he may just be too weak to get up into the trees and is hiding under the brush somewhere.
juvenile crows are tough jay, i had one die from stress once last summer, i'm still sick to this day about it, i was just bringing him upstairs to the rehab room and he started panting and kicked onto his back and died, it was awful i did everything i could to revive him, balled my eyes out over it.
Bella_F Bella_F is offline
Posted 29th August 2010, 10:23 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Jay3 View Post
Hi Bella, I understand how you feel, but I don't agree that it would have been better for you to have left that other crow outside to die. Many of us have captured and treated wild birds, and later been able to release them to have another chance at life. Your trying to help him was the right thing to do. It's just that sometimes, it's just too late for them by the time we get them, and nothing we can do will save them. It was still better that he died inside, rather than out there where he would have been an easy target for predators.
And trying to give them a chance to recover and then be released back to their life when we can, is better than not trying at all. Sometimes we just can't change what is to be, but I feel that we still need to try. It hurts us when we lose them, but that isn't important. What is important is that we tried for them.
Hi Jay,

Yes, I'm sorry for what I said and how I said it- I know you are totally right generally speaking, and its best to help when we can, even if it doesn't turn out well. Humans have our love, strong medicine, and we can keep them warm & safe from predators when they are sick. What carers do is totally worth it.

I have been hurting awful, and my head isn't clear right now. I loved him, and I miss his little face so much. I keep looking outside expectantly, hoping against hope he'll turn up, and I cry very time I do it. Its been two whole days now since I saw him last and I know he couldn't have made it now
Bella_F Bella_F is offline
Posted 29th August 2010, 11:17 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by altgirl35 View Post
oh bella i'm so sorry to hear this, the poor little guy, i hope you can find his body, i would keep looking, he may just be too weak to get up into the trees and is hiding under the brush somewhere.
juvenile crows are tough jay, i had one die from stress once last summer, i'm still sick to this day about it, i was just bringing him upstairs to the rehab room and he started panting and kicked onto his back and died, it was awful i did everything i could to revive him, balled my eyes out over it.
Hugs Altgirl,

Thanks for your support, and I am so sorry that happened to you: ( Crows are very sensitive, and I do think its a big decision to capture a sick one, as the stress is extremely bad for them...more than pigeons I think.

I agree that juvenile crows are very hardy, and so smart! I just think this little one must have had the pox internally as well as on his feet, otherwise he might have made it (since I was feeding him well). It also didn't help that he was a late summer baby, so he only had about 2 months to grow before winter hit him. He was the youngest in the area, and I guess his immune system wasn't all there yet.

Thanks again!

X Bella
Bella_F Bella_F is offline
Posted 30th August 2010, 01:28 AM
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PS. During this ordeal, while I was feeling worried about the pox spreading to other crows in the flock, I came across a newsletter from a local (Australian) wildlife carers magazine from 2002.

In it was an article about a healthy looking young crow being brought into a carer's aviary, and then her otherwise 10 healthy crows getting very sick. She then realized that the baby crow had a tiny pox lesion on its toe, and that he was spreading pox in her aviary. So she removed the one wit the pox lesion, and treated the rest with a probiotic called protexin , and vitamin powder in the crows food. This resulted in all of the ten sick crows from recovering fully.

Anyway, I went out and bought a jar of protexin powder and I've been putting in the water.

Altgirl, you probably know all about probiotics from your experiences, but just in case you have heard this, apparently probiotics are very good for captured birds. You just give them a double dose of probiotic after capture, and its supposed to protect them from the effects of shock & stress.

Anyway, the idea of it gives me some feeling of hope that next time i have to take in a wild bird, then maybe I can do something to stop them from deteriorating so quickly because of stress. But I dunno! I haven't done this before.
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altgirl35 altgirl35 is offline
Posted 30th August 2010, 09:07 AM
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ah bella i'm so sorry your hurting
and oh yes i do the probiotics with everything including mammals and my own pet birds.
i've only had a couple of birds with pox and they were all juvie cardinals and pulled through with time.
all i did was give baytril the whole time they had lesions and dabbed diluted betadine on the lesions twice a day.
i have never lost a bird to stress except for that baby last year, piji's are usually pretty easy going even the wild ones
Bella_F Bella_F is offline
Posted 30th August 2010, 04:47 PM
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Thanks heaps altgirl! You must be a gifted carer to have saved all those cardinals from pox. Also, I appreciate the info you shared, about adding the Baytril to the probiotics (or vice versa).

Still no sign of him today I wish I'd found his body just so I would snap out of this feeling of hope that I might see him again.
 

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