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birdy birdy is offline
Posted 25th June 2004, 08:12 AM
Join Date: Mar 2004
Posts: 281

Power molt


Hi RE Lee,

You may be on to something. I used the light system - your Oklahoma neighbor's version, CBS - last year and this year. I didn't race old birds this spring and really didn't pay attention to how my yearlings molted. I've noted at various times when the flights have dropped on this year's YB team and I'm beginning to think that they would have molted the same time naturally. It does seem to have accelerated the body molt, though.

I read an article recently by Bob Rowland that he titled, Power Molting. This is where a pigeon's primary flights will be cut and pulled so that they grow back in time for YB training. So, if you're 1st race is Sep 1 and you want to start training Aug 1, you would work backwards 45 days (the time it takes the flight to grow back) to around mid June to pull the flights that have not dropped. Actually, you would want to cut them around June 1 so that the blood drains and drys the quill before you pull them. Of course the pigeons would need to be kept in the loft as they would have some difficulty in flying until their flights grew back.

I'm still mulling this one over. Has anyone tried this or have an opinion?

birdy
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re lee re lee is offline
Posted 25th June 2004, 06:44 PM
Join Date: Jan 2003
Location: enid okla
Posts: 4,198
Smile

That would hamper them in reduced loft training . But It would moult out the flights. And yes six weeks is about the full growth time for them to grow back. Youg birds drop there flights at age intervils. Then agin in full moult. So if ther are darkened. Body and tail moult will kick in but The baby flights will still be there. Until next years moult. So best would be not race the yearlings out past say 300 miles. Then as full old birds. They are now ready. Both in age and feather. It would just be so much easyer to put race season after the main moult time. Late sept to first october. . Less races. but better compition. And as most do these days. You would not have to raise as many birds. As the heat and the moult helps in the early losses. Then the rest is quality breeding. In the early heat races. Birds set down to drink. And if not in decent feather. Tire much faster. Then never make it home. Or home late. Not a true test . Now OLD bird there weeds out the less at a better test of abilty. What you migh do is say When the young bird comes out of the nest. pull number ten flight. Then when it strat to come in . Pull nine and down that line. The early hatch birds would be all dropped then in the darkening system Very well would drop and grow new flights. as a full moult. I think this could work. Might even pull ten and nine. and the rest two at a time.
birdy birdy is offline
Posted 28th June 2004, 08:07 PM
Join Date: Mar 2004
Posts: 281
RE,

I like the way you think - it's outside the ol' box. I'm going to do a lot of mulling over what you posted on pulling flights and when to pull them. How do you handle the darkening in hot Oklahoma with covering all the windows? Thanks for your posts they're very thought provoking.

birdy
 
SmithFamilyLoft SmithFamilyLoft is offline
Posted 10th July 2005, 04:25 AM
Join Date: Nov 2004
Country: United States
Posts: 5,367
Quote:
Originally Posted by birdy
Hi RE Lee,

You may be on to something. I used the light system - your Oklahoma neighbor's version, CBS - last year and this year. I didn't race old birds this spring and really didn't pay attention to how my yearlings molted. I've noted at various times when the flights have dropped on this year's YB team and I'm beginning to think that they would have molted the same time naturally. It does seem to have accelerated the body molt, though.

I read an article recently by Bob Rowland that he titled, Power Molting. This is where a pigeon's primary flights will be cut and pulled so that they grow back in time for YB training. So, if you're 1st race is Sep 1 and you want to start training Aug 1, you would work backwards 45 days (the time it takes the flight to grow back) to around mid June to pull the flights that have not dropped. Actually, you would want to cut them around June 1 so that the blood drains and drys the quill before you pull them. Of course the pigeons would need to be kept in the loft as they would have some difficulty in flying until their flights grew back.

I'm still mulling this one over. Has anyone tried this or have an opinion?

birdy
Hello Birdy,

I suggest that you procced with caution. When you attempt methods such as these, without a full knowledge and understanding of the details, you run the risk of needing to sit out a YB season. There are pros and cons to every "method", and the perfect method has yet to be invented.

I read with some amusement, what guys past and present, have done in the name of gaining an "edge". Some have over the years proven to be sound, many, if not most, have not.

For some reason, when someone writes an article, and manages to get it circulated, people will assign more creditability to it. I guess I am just one of those, that needs to be convinced.
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Skyeking Skyeking is offline
Posted 10th July 2005, 08:14 AM
Join Date: Jan 2003
Country: United States
Location: SE Coast Central Florida
Posts: 25,397
Warren,

Birdy is/was a moderator here, who did excellent in young bird races last year in Texas, I don't know all the details because the hurricanes took care of my computer last year and I didn't get back on line until recently.

He made a life changing decision and moved to England and had to sell his birds. He was one of the few progressive voices in racing and had a wealth of knowledge not only in racing, but the importance of nutrition & prevention aspect of it. He also treated his birds with love and respect and I for one, miss his input here.

Treesa



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k-will k-will is offline
Posted 14th December 2007, 07:45 PM
Join Date: Dec 2007
Posts: 377
you make a great point talking of breeding late hatches to preserve your family,(and have an old bird team if you fly your ybs hard).getting to the subject of training pigeons.i have flown and trained pigeons about every different way out there at one time or another.the way i train my birds now is...as a round of youngsters hit the age where they are "kitting"-and leaving and returning,"routing".i basket up those birds and carry them 5 miles.i release only 2 birds together.i make sure they are gone before i release 2 more and so on.i train my "rounds" of youngsters together always.later younger rounds go thru this same process.all rounds are trained out to 35 miles and then returned to loft flying until 4 weeks before races.this is alot of work and requires alot of patience.you can learn your different "rounds" by using colored plastic bands whick makes it easy if you have 3 or more rounds in the loft at once.i have lost birds,but had much better success sice i started using this type of training.later when you train them for the yb series of races,you would also start with double tossing and work down to single tossing.then you must toss your birds with other fanciers birds and they will learn to break away from them and come home.then you have a well educated pigeon that has a chance to compete and can think on his own.just my .02 k-will
dannyleechen dannyleechen is offline
Posted 15th February 2008, 06:11 AM
Join Date: Nov 2007
Location: Taiwan
Posts: 5
Quote:
Originally Posted by birdy View Post
Hi Chris,

I'm sure there are 1,001 different methods but I'll share mine.

I assume that you are talking about young bird training and not old birds.

I raise very early youngsters. I pair my breeders around Thanksgiving and plan my 1st round to hatch at Christmas. I then band (ring) my youngsters around New Year's day. I use the light system so that my youngsters will molt during June/July and have a brand new set of flights for the races.

I have a California type of aviary where the trap door is within the aviary. Weaned youngsters are placed in the young bird loft at 4 weeks of age and trained with a whistle and shaking the feed can to go through the traps. The aviary doors are opened just about an hour before feeding at 6 weeks of age so that they can take their first flights around the loft. Hawks are particularly worrisome at this point.

They are loft flown daily until mid May when I start road training. The youngsters are routing by then where they fly out of sight for 30 - 45 minutes. They are taken on about 10 training tosses. The first is within site of the loft a few hundred yards away. The second toss is at 1 mile. For this training I go in the direction of the race course but I don't think its all that important. Also, I don't work on speed trapping. They're tossed in small groups of 7 or 8 at 15 minutes apart. If you have a partner who can watch for their return and whistle them in, all the better. I don't so I just return after the last toss and usually find them sitting on the loft and then call them in. For this training I'm really interested in developing their homing skills. I will do another at 1 mile, twice at 5 miles, maybe 3 times at 10, then a couple each at 20 and then 30.

This 1st phase of their road training is finished around mid June. Then because my young pigeons were on the light system they begin to molt severely. I separate the boys from the girls. I feed a lot of oil seeds like hemp and safflower and other small seeds to help with feather growth. Give them pigeon tea with honey. Leave them very quiet. Loft fly only if they want alternating the boys one day and the girls the next.

By the first of August they have regrown most all their flights. A few will still have the 9th and 10th coming in. We then begin road training in earnest. I have a refresher where I take them once at 1,5,10,20, and 30. Now this is where it is very helpful to have another person at the loft to work them through the traps as fast as possible. I find it best to do this in the morning and have their feeding consistent with their training. You want them to trap as fast as possible now. If you have an electronic clock go ahead and enter your team and start watching their times. You'll begin to notice your sprinters now.

Now there are many methods used by as many racers on preparing your team a few weeks before the first race. I'm a big believer in having my youngsters an hour in the air daily. The best is on the road. If you loft fly, have them in air for an hour in the morning and an hour in the evening. You should however try to get them on the road at least 4 times a week from at least 30 to 40 miles.

Regarding direction... Train in the direction of the race course at first. Try to find the break point. Draw lines on a map from the lofts in your club to the release point. Look at the winning lofts last year and see their routes. Toss a few times along their routes about 40 miles from your loft. A GPS unit is pretty handy to help with all this. Personally, I like tossing my birds at times about 90 degrees off the race course as I thinks it helps with their homing skills.

Now this is very important... toss your birds with another club member or a few members birds at least once before the first race. Trust me if you don't do this most of your youngsters will follow other birds home on their first race. They will probably smarten up by the second race but it's best to sort this out before the season.

Another tip that I plan to do this season is train my youngsters against the wind. You can really strengthen them with this kind of training plus they then know how to handle a tricky windy day of racing which will happen.

I feed my youngsters during training 40% barley, 40% race mix, and 20% pellets.

I know this is a very long post and I apologize. One thing that is very important is to know when enough is enough. Don't over work your birds. When you come into the loft and they're picking themselves off their perches flapping their wings a 100 mph you will know that they're ready to fly. Keep them healthy and don't underfeed but don't overfeed. It's a zen thing and balance is the key as it is in all ways of life.

Hope this helps a little. Good luck with your pigeons.

birdy
wow i have read this article it is very useful!!
jots jets jots jets is offline
Posted 11th May 2008, 08:43 AM
Join Date: May 2008
Posts: 10

training


buy the book rontondo on racing pigeons it help me win 6 out of ten races in the nwi racing pigeon club my first year flying has complete training methods for young and old birds.
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older birds, pigeon club, pigeon mix, pigeon pellets, racing pigeon, racing pigeon club, white bird, young bird, young pigeon



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