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mart9894 mart9894 is offline
Posted 10th August 2019, 04:29 PM
Join Date: Sep 2014
Country: United States
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Rehoming pigeons


I have a friend who raises all white homing pigeons he has bred 20 young birds (never been outside of the loft) he gave them to me immediately after the parents drop them out of their nesting boxes and were starting to eat on their own. I then brought them to my loft and had them in there about 3-4 weeks. I then let them out and I have lost 9 birds the other are now flying 2 miles and returning home daily. I let out a second batch of 20 birds that he gave me after being in the loft 3-4 weeks. I let them out in the morning around 8am it is now 6:30pm and I have not got any birds back. I saw on my cameras that they were down on the grass and on top of the loft and a hawk landed on the cable wires and spooked them. How likely am I to get them back? I see them flying around the neighborhood.
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Crazy Pete Crazy Pete is offline
Posted 10th August 2019, 05:25 PM
Join Date: Nov 2008
Location: Nebraska
Posts: 4,832
First you should have asked about how to go about this, I would have soaked the wings with soapy water so they could not fly and only let them out hungry. But that's to late now so you better stay out with them till dark or they come home so the hawk stays away.
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beachwood45789 beachwood45789 is offline
Posted 11th August 2019, 05:52 AM
Join Date: Jul 2014
Country: United States
Posts: 160
Hi, like pete said you should have asked for help be for you let them out, they should have been hungry feed is your control over the birds and you should have not kept them in your loft for 3 or 4 weeks, 1 week would have been fine you waited to long be for you let them out they got to strong on the wing thats why they took off when you let out young birds for the 1st time they should not be able to fly to good just enough to fly up to the top of your loft and back down to the landing board and you said your camera took video of them rule # 1 never leave your birds out if you are not there a lot of bad things could happen Beachwood
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Ladygrey Ladygrey is offline
Posted 11th August 2019, 06:39 AM
Join Date: Dec 2016
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Originally Posted by mart9894 View Post
I have a friend who raises all white homing pigeons he has bred 20 young birds (never been outside of the loft) he gave them to me immediately after the parents drop them out of their nesting boxes and were starting to eat on their own. I then brought them to my loft and had them in there about 3-4 weeks. I then let them out and I have lost 9 birds the other are now flying 2 miles and returning home daily. I let out a second batch of 20 birds that he gave me after being in the loft 3-4 weeks. I let them out in the morning around 8am it is now 6:30pm and I have not got any birds back. I saw on my cameras that they were down on the grass and on top of the loft and a hawk landed on the cable wires and spooked them. How likely am I to get them back? I see them flying around the neighborhood.
Imo handicapping their wings is an easy target for a hawk..

There are steps you have to take with them and if one step is not completed then it can cause problems.

First step, use a feed call everytime you feed them.. a whistle or just say here pigeons.. what ever, just as long as it is the same sound every time and done every time you feed them.. do not over feed. Leave feed down for 20 mins , then take it up if there is any left. Makes sure it is enough feed for everyone but not excess.

When they start to respond to your feed call by dropping off their perches and eating immediately after your call and putting the feed in then you know they learned the feedcall.

Second, make settling cages on your landing board in front of the their trap door.

Put the pigeon in the settling cage and close the trap door about a half hour before feeding. Let them see outside, when time to feed open the trap door and use your feed call, repeat this until they come in through the trap door without hesitation to come to eat , because you called them, and they already learned step one.

Three, after they come in from the settling cage without much hesitation to a feed call , let them out on the landing board without the settling cage an hour before you feed them. At feeding time do your feed call and put the feed down. The smart ones will come in first, you still may have a few goofy ones in a tree or roof.. oh well they don’t get to eat if they do not trap in, there is always a few of these. Close the trap after a good 20 mins, birds who did not trap have to stay the night outside the loft.. most times they will trap the next day at your feed call routine and learned their lesson.

This regimen gets easier as the birds mature and get savvy.

My pigeons now , we take down the settling cage in front of the their doors to let them out to fly and they do on their own, I think that is important, rather than forcing . They need to feel the loft is a secure safe place, low stress. I only go in there to clean and feed and tend to babies if I decide to hatch any , then I’m out of there.. they like their own calm space.

Your birds are still young.. babies still really, they need more time and training . If one thing on those steps is not done by you then the bird will not learn and it will be confusing. And you lose birds.

I taught my first bought young birds this and only had to do it that one year I got them. Their young learn to go out and back in from the parent birds now and I do not have to restrict feed or do a call any longer .

Last edited by Ladygrey; 11th August 2019 at 06:46 AM..
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Crazy Pete Crazy Pete is offline
Posted 11th August 2019, 09:45 AM
Join Date: Nov 2008
Location: Nebraska
Posts: 4,832
Ladygrey

Imo handicapping their wings is an easy target for a hawk..

That is right sort of but the way I see it is he lost 9 of the first batch and all 20 of the second batch, when if he soaked the wings he may have lost 2 or 3 out of the 40. Every one has their own way of doing it but that's how I do it and I stay out with the birds till they go in, and some times that's all day.

I do like the settling cage and yes I only let them out hungry.
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beachwood45789 beachwood45789 is offline
Posted 11th August 2019, 04:12 PM
Join Date: Jul 2014
Country: United States
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Hi Mart, you say you see them around the area flying around do you have any birds that are already stuck to the loft? if you do let them out and the lost ones might see them and try to land on the loft. do you have any other birds in your loft even ones that dont fly to good if you do when you see the lost ones throw them toward the loft and maybe a few will try and land. you should always have a few chicos they are birds that dont really fly and are used to coax you birds down birds like satinetts or some big pigeons that dont fly well you will always need birds like that to coax your birds in. Beachwood
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mart9894 mart9894 is offline
Posted 11th August 2019, 05:10 PM
Join Date: Sep 2014
Country: United States
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I have gotten half my birds back so far. This is the second day. When should I let the birds that have come back out again or should I keep them inside the loft and practice trapping some more? Or should I let them back out ASAP?
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Ladygrey Ladygrey is offline
Posted 12th August 2019, 07:49 AM
Join Date: Dec 2016
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Crazy Pete View Post
Ladygrey

Imo handicapping their wings is an easy target for a hawk..

That is right sort of but the way I see it is he lost 9 of the first batch and all 20 of the second batch, when if he soaked the wings he may have lost 2 or 3 out of the 40. Every one has their own way of doing it but that's how I do it and I stay out with the birds till they go in, and some times that's all day.

I do like the settling cage and yes I only let them out hungry.
These are white homers, and really do not need to be rushed or handicapped.. when training for racing that is and can be different.

If I had to guess he got these white birds for enjoyment.. and possible release , but not racing. They do not need to be rushed or handicapped.
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Ladygrey Ladygrey is offline
Posted 12th August 2019, 07:51 AM
Join Date: Dec 2016
Country: ************
Posts: 639
Quote:
Originally Posted by mart9894 View Post
I have gotten half my birds back so far. This is the second day. When should I let the birds that have come back out again or should I keep them inside the loft and practice trapping some more? Or should I let them back out ASAP?
Please read my post. It will save you a lot of time and trouble with less losses.
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CourtneyJ CourtneyJ is offline
Posted 14th August 2019, 06:48 PM
Join Date: Jun 2017
Country: United States
Location: Marysville, Washington
Posts: 11
Quote:
Originally Posted by mart9894 View Post
I have a friend who raises all white homing pigeons he has bred 20 young birds (never been outside of the loft) he gave them to me immediately after the parents drop them out of their nesting boxes and were starting to eat on their own. I then brought them to my loft and had them in there about 3-4 weeks. I then let them out and I have lost 9 birds the other are now flying 2 miles and returning home daily. I let out a second batch of 20 birds that he gave me after being in the loft 3-4 weeks. I let them out in the morning around 8am it is now 6:30pm and I have not got any birds back. I saw on my cameras that they were down on the grass and on top of the loft and a hawk landed on the cable wires and spooked them. How likely am I to get them back? I see them flying around the neighborhood.
Whereabouts did this happen? I asked because two all-white homing pigeons recently came into the wildlife rescue I volunteer at within a couple days of each other. We don't usually get those in unless they're Strays from someone's flock. One of them has a plain band with no info around it's ankle.

Last edited by CourtneyJ; 14th August 2019 at 06:52 PM..
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White Homers White Homers is offline
Posted 15th August 2019, 05:33 AM
Join Date: Sep 2016
Country: United States
Location: New York
Posts: 458
Do as LadyGray said and you would be good. They have to learn how to enter the loft. Now that you have some that are wed to the loft it will be much easier. Let the ones that came back out with the others. If the lost birds see the others flying you may get some more back. Good luck.
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