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Scoria Scoria is offline
Posted 17th September 2019, 08:31 PM
Join Date: Jun 2018
Posts: 11

Ringneck pair's first clutch - when/how to prevent next clutch?


I have a young pair of ringnecks and they had a pair of eggs 2 days ago. They dutifully take turns sitting on the nest and will puff up and even peck my hand if I try to get a peek (I should have snapped some pictures before they got so protective, the eggs are really lovely). I want to let them raise this clutch but not future ones as there's not much demand for doves in the area. I've read some claims that just removing the nest is enough to prevent laying while others say you can't stop laying and just need to swap them out for dummies and was wondering which was true.
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Scoria Scoria is offline
Posted 17th September 2019, 08:32 PM
Join Date: Jun 2018
Posts: 11
*not too days ago, the 11th was when I noticed the eggs.
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cwebster cwebster is offline
Posted 17th September 2019, 09:07 PM
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Location: Central Coast, CA
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To keep from having too many pigeons, we swap out their eggs for fake eggs. When our beloved Phoebe had internal problems, our avian vet put in deslorelin implants to prevent laying. Would suggest fake eggs.
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Scoria Scoria is offline
Posted 17th September 2019, 09:22 PM
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Is there a way to prevent egg development altogether? Perhaps manipulate light so they think it's winter and go out of reproduction mode?
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Marina B Marina B is offline
Posted 17th September 2019, 11:17 PM
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You can prevent egg development by making small holes in the egg. I take a needle, and pierce the egg straight through from 2 sides, so there are 4 tiny holes in the egg. They will still incubate the egg, but it will just rot. For the longterm, it will be better to get fake eggs.
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Ladygrey Ladygrey is offline
Posted 20th September 2019, 10:26 AM
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Originally Posted by Scoria View Post
Is there a way to prevent egg development altogether? Perhaps manipulate light so they think it's winter and go out of reproduction mode?
No you can not stop it altogether. You can slow it down with light or lack thereof. They do slow down in winter naturally.. esp if you keep them in a room that a lamp or lights are not used after dark , or when the sunsets, they should not have supplemental light...

Supplemental light that can be used is for vitamin d3 which is important for house birds with no natural sunlight exposure.. kept on a timer they get uv light as needed but not over doing it..

Last edited by Ladygrey; 20th September 2019 at 10:29 AM..
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alegna71 alegna71 is offline
Posted 25th September 2019, 10:33 PM
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Plastic Eggs


Hi, I have ringneck doves and pigeons and swap their eggs for plastic eggs. That way they lay less often and this is better for their health than removing eggs completely which makes them lay again straight away. The doves seem happy to lay on a clutch of plastic eggs for weeks! Pigeons are cleverer; eggs have to be warmed up and swapped when they aren't looking.
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Scoria Scoria is offline
Posted 26th September 2019, 02:05 PM
Join Date: Jun 2018
Posts: 11
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Originally Posted by Marina B View Post
You can prevent egg development by making small holes in the egg. I take a needle, and pierce the egg straight through from 2 sides, so there are 4 tiny holes in the egg. They will still incubate the egg, but it will just rot. For the longterm, it will be better to get fake eggs.
I meant preventing them from reproducing altogether, rather than killing the eggs. I know it's part of being a responsible owner, but I feel bad to have to kill the eggs, and the female is still spending her calcium and energy on forming them, so I was wondering if there was a safe way to get them out of breeding mode.
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Scoria Scoria is offline
Posted 26th September 2019, 02:12 PM
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Originally Posted by Ladygrey View Post
Quote:
Originally Posted by Scoria View Post
Is there a way to prevent egg development altogether? Perhaps manipulate light so they think it's winter and go out of reproduction mode?
No you can not stop it altogether. You can slow it down with light or lack thereof. They do slow down in winter naturally.. esp if you keep them in a room that a lamp or lights are not used after dark , or when the sunsets, they should not have supplemental light...

Supplemental light that can be used is for vitamin d3 which is important for house birds with no natural sunlight exposure.. kept on a timer they get uv light as needed but not over doing it..
I do have a full spectrum light set on a timer for them and my other birds. Though they also have a window in the room to watch the outside and see the time of day. I guess I'll just have to wait and see how winter affects them.
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Ladygrey Ladygrey is offline
Posted 4th October 2019, 05:33 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Scoria View Post
I meant preventing them from reproducing altogether, rather than killing the eggs. I know it's part of being a responsible owner, but I feel bad to have to kill the eggs, and the female is still spending her calcium and energy on forming them, so I was wondering if there was a safe way to get them out of breeding mode.
Some people who raise pigeons will separate the pairs in fall and give the hen a break during winter, because they still can be harassed by the male to nest and lay. But for rn doves I would find that disruption very stressful.

The eggs when first laid are the same as the chicken eggs you eat for breakfast.. so discarding them or laying them out for the crows to eat is harming nothing. The use of fake replacements is essential.
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Scoria Scoria is offline
Posted 6th October 2019, 04:34 PM
Join Date: Jun 2018
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Originally Posted by Ladygrey View Post
Quote:
Originally Posted by Scoria View Post
I meant preventing them from reproducing altogether, rather than killing the eggs. I know it's part of being a responsible owner, but I feel bad to have to kill the eggs, and the female is still spending her calcium and energy on forming them, so I was wondering if there was a safe way to get them out of breeding mode.
Some people who raise pigeons will separate the pairs in fall and give the hen a break during winter, because they still can be harassed by the male to nest and lay. But for rn doves I would find that disruption very stressful.

The eggs when first laid are the same as the chicken eggs you eat for breakfast.. so discarding them or laying them out for the crows to eat is harming nothing. The use of fake replacements is essential.
Chicken eggs from the store are rarely fertilized. And even when I do eat fertilized eggs, they are serving a purpose. I know throwing them out before the baby can develop is humane, but I still feel bad about it. An unfertilized egg will never become anything but rotten. A fertile one could be a beautiful new dove. I know what I have to do to be responsible, that doesn't mean I have to like it and lie to myself about it. Animal husbandry will always have cold, practical aspects about it.
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Ladygrey Ladygrey is offline
Posted 10th October 2019, 05:43 AM
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Originally Posted by Scoria View Post
Chicken eggs from the store are rarely fertilized. And even when I do eat fertilized eggs, they are serving a purpose. I know throwing them out before the baby can develop is humane, but I still feel bad about it. An unfertilized egg will never become anything but rotten. A fertile one could be a beautiful new dove. I know what I have to do to be responsible, that doesn't mean I have to like it and lie to myself about it. Animal husbandry will always have cold, practical aspects about it.
Not every egg is fertile. So nothing to feel bad about. And one never knows if the egg they had for breakfast was or not. Keeping chickens has taught me this. If I felt bad Id never eat one of my chickens eggs ever again..lol..
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