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Hydrawxide Hydrawxide is offline
Posted 21st May 2013, 09:21 PM
Join Date: May 2013
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Where are located? I have a singleton starling if your in mass
Unfortunately, I'm half-way across the country in Washington State. And as of yesterday, we have our hands full with yet another young baby starling who was far worse off than the little one whom originally sparked me to start this thread.

Which, by the way, she looks so much more grown up now. SEE?!



As for the newest little rescue baby, a couple of kids found this little one and their mother told them to put him on wet paper towels. When we got there, the paper towels were cold and the baby could hardly keep his head up and his eyes open and was chilled to the touch. Not to mention, he was crawling with little mites that would pour off the poor guy in the hundreds.

Thanks to the StarlingTalk site, I was able to clear up the mites quickly and painlessly and deal with the immediate trouble of dehydration. The poor little one was so dehydrated it's stool pretty much crumbled - almost no moisture at ALL.

But thanks to a long night of round the clock feeding, vitamins, and bugless warmth. He now looks like he may just make it. He's been putting up a bit of a fight while being handled, huddling away from our hands, his eyes are open and wide. He can support his own wings, instead of letting them sag at his sides and he has a hunger that is unrivaled.

We still have a long way to go but, judging by his stool and complete 360 in behavior, we've got him on the right track. And here this little guy is.



We're hoping that maybe the pair will bond(which we will try carefully once they are both 'grown') and possibly be able to be released together. Although, with the number of people around here who say I should just feed them to our dogs, I'm a little paranoid at letting these precious babies out in a world that wants them dead. But it's not my right to keep them from their freedom. So woe is me. LOL! I guess I'll let them decide, in the end.

Last edited by Hydrawxide; 21st May 2013 at 09:23 PM..
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Jay3 Jay3 is offline
Posted 21st May 2013, 10:56 PM
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Oh he/she is precious! Sounds like your making headway with him. Good luck and let us know how things turn out. Your other baby looks great! Good job.
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Vova Vova is offline
Posted 22nd May 2013, 12:55 AM
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They aren't native to the states, they are destroying the native habitats. the US government is spending countless of out tax dollars to exterminate these birds.

You are not helping by caring for this chick.
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Jay3 Jay3 is offline
Posted 22nd May 2013, 09:29 AM
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Originally Posted by Vova View Post
They aren't native to the states, they are destroying the native habitats. the US government is spending countless of out tax dollars to exterminate these birds.

You are not helping by caring for this chick.

Well, there are many who feel the same way about pigeons. Thank God not everyone agrees, or this site wouldn't be here. I don't think helping 2 baby orphans is going to make all that much impact now. Do you?
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spirit wings spirit wings is offline
Posted 22nd May 2013, 09:43 AM
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Originally Posted by Vova View Post
They aren't native to the states, they are destroying the native habitats. the US government is spending countless of out tax dollars to exterminate these birds.

You are not helping by caring for this chick.
"aren't native"
neither are honey bees or you. humans put them here, we at least can have a heart when we see a baby in need as they are here to stay and are naturalizing.
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Jay3 Jay3 is offline
Posted 22nd May 2013, 10:04 AM
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I didn't know that about the honey bee. Interesting. We did have other bees doing the pollinating before they got here. But didn't realize that the honey bee wasn't native. Thought they were just always here.
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altgirl35 altgirl35 is offline
Posted 23rd May 2013, 08:59 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Vova View Post
They aren't native to the states, they are destroying the native habitats. the US government is spending countless of out tax dollars to exterminate these birds.

You are not helping by caring for this chick.
They ignorantly kill them to protect crops when in fact they are killing countless native species
Has nothing to do with any damage they do to crops
Because in fact they are very benificial to crops because they eat loads of bugs
Farmers don't like them because they will eat grain left in the open
So instead of protecting the grain by keeping it covered
They poison the hell out of them, and in turn poison grackles (which are dissapearing all over the US) many species of black birds including endangered ones and who know how many hawk and other prey species that would make a meal out of a dying bird
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Jay3 Jay3 is offline
Posted 23rd May 2013, 09:07 PM
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Originally Posted by altgirl35 View Post
They ignorantly kill them to protect crops when in fact they are killing countless native species
Has nothing to do with any damage they do to crops
Because in fact they are very benificial to crops because they eat loads of bugs
Farmers don't like them because they will eat grain left in the open
So instead of protecting the grain by keeping it covered
They poison the hell out of them, and in turn poison grackles (which are dissapearing all over the US) many species of black birds including endangered ones and who know how many hawk and other prey species that would make a meal out of a dying bird
Very good points Jodi. Thank you.
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spirit wings spirit wings is offline
Posted 23rd May 2013, 10:01 PM
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Originally Posted by altgirl35 View Post
They ignorantly kill them to protect crops when in fact they are killing countless native species
Has nothing to do with any damage they do to crops
Because in fact they are very benificial to crops because they eat loads of bugs
Farmers don't like them because they will eat grain left in the open
So instead of protecting the grain by keeping it covered
They poison the hell out of them, and in turn poison grackles (which are dissapearing all over the US) many species of black birds including endangered ones and who know how many hawk and other prey species that would make a meal out of a dying bird
Amen sista! but and not a bad but, we brought them here and to Bi*** about them now is pointless. Im not a farmer and do recognize their defeneding their livelihood...poison is not a way. anyone who cares about the land and nature surely can see that..and the food chain it flows too.
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Msfreebird Msfreebird is offline
Posted 24th May 2013, 03:48 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Vova View Post
They aren't native to the states, they are destroying the native habitats. the US government is spending countless of out tax dollars to exterminate these birds.

You are not helping by caring for this chick.
Pigeons aren't native either.....but we keep them, care for them and love them!
And if you think about it, she IS helping by caring for this chick.....especially if she keeps it as a pet. She's keeping the crops safe from this bird, and the bird safe from farmers.
And on this subject, I have a question. Baltimore Oriole's - they winter in Central and South America, and summer in the U.S. Where does that put them as far as 'natives'?
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Last edited by Msfreebird; 24th May 2013 at 04:01 AM..
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tjc1 tjc1 is offline
Posted 24th May 2013, 06:38 AM
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If they are not introduced and the natural migration pattern is to go from one area to another they are native. So the would mean the Baltimore Oriole is native. All animals compete for food. Inevasive species are introduced and have a special trait to out compete native species for their needs. Some inevasive species are introduced because of that special trait that makes them better. Some mollusks have special adaptation to filter the water better and clean up the enviroment.
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altgirl35 altgirl35 is offline
Posted 24th May 2013, 09:33 AM
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Migrating birds are native
Only ones not protected under te migratory treaty act are
Pigeons, English sparrows, mute swans and European starling
They are all here to stay and there is no changing that fact
We could never eradicate them
Nature will adapt
It always does
We may lose species forever though
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Msfreebird Msfreebird is offline
Posted 24th May 2013, 01:34 PM
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Originally Posted by tjc1 View Post
If they are not introduced and the natural migration pattern is to go from one area to another they are native. So the would mean the Baltimore Oriole is native. All animals compete for food. Inevasive species are introduced and have a special trait to out compete native species for their needs. Some inevasive species are introduced because of that special trait that makes them better. Some mollusks have special adaptation to filter the water better and clean up the enviroment.
Quote:
Originally Posted by altgirl35 View Post
Migrating birds are native
Only ones not protected under te migratory treaty act are
Pigeons, English sparrows, mute swans and European starling
They are all here to stay and there is no changing that fact
We could never eradicate them
Nature will adapt
It always does
We may lose species forever though
OK....Thanks
I just thought it was interesting that they (Baltimore Oriole's) are prevalent in the northeast, then fly all the way to South America for the winter! They must have to leave early to get there LOL
I'm an avid bird watcher, and love to attract them to my yard. Funny thing is.....I've never seen a 'Bluebird' in my whole life here in Maine. Earlier this month, I saw 5 of them in a bush! They were stunning!!!! I didn't even think they were up in this neck of the woods!
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altgirl35 altgirl35 is offline
Posted 24th May 2013, 02:25 PM
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Bluebirds are amazing
They are one species that really takes a beating from English sparrows
I've had many scalped ones
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Hydrawxide Hydrawxide is offline
Posted 1st June 2013, 11:09 AM
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Hey all! I appreciate everyone going to bat for these birds. I know I deal with a lot of BS day in and day out because I raise them and openly tell people that if they find a bird that needs help, I'll help. Ah well. I know I have saved and will continue to save more lives than most people can say they have, so why would I change based on other peoples' opinions? Hehe.

Regardless! I'm popping in to let you all know that the pair are doing fantastic.



The birds spent a good portion getting acclimated to each other before finally being introduced together today. The little one on the right is actually the second baby I rescued. The bird on the left is the one whom I originally rescued. Obviously, both are alive and well and still loud and eating as ravenously as usual.

It's coming down to the decision on whether or not the two are fit to be released or, if I should just keep them out of harms way with me.

My original bird still steps up and likes to lounge on your head and shoulders but, since the introduction of the other bird, has gotten a little nippy(not like starling bites hurt in any way but). It will still follow us from one corner of the room to the next, keeping a close eye on our feet in hopes of new prey being unearthed, or simply to sit with you.

While we raised the second little one with a lot less contact so it is a bit more 'wild' so to speak. Although it also has begun to follow us, still begs from us, still likes to cuddle against our legs and/or hands, etc. But has been nippy from the very beginning, as we'd originally hoped to be able to release it as well.

I'd like to release them both together, if I do so at all. But I'm nervous about the people who live around us and how 'okay' these birds are with people. They don't fear us, they don't care if we're walking around and often times have a curiosity for what we're doing and get closer. I know how people consider these birds to be 'terrible' and people go out of their way to harm them and I don't want to simply release them to die.

But I also know that they are wild animals and I'd in no way want to keep their freedom from them. So the question rests; to release, or not to release?

I know the release process will have to be gradual and such and I know it's possible with a certain touch, but I also have no qualms with giving them their own room in my house to muck about in, regardless of if they're tame or not.

So it's win/win either way. I'm just looking for the best option for the birds. So lend me your opinions guys? Should I start processing them for release and just let whatever fate has in store for them guide them or, (because I don't mind whether they are wild or not) just leave them to themselves inside with me and my family?

You all have been there through it all. So help me make the final decision in these guys' lives.

Last edited by Hydrawxide; 1st June 2013 at 11:11 AM..
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