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I can't remember whether it is smokey or sooty that can cause that 'third bar' effect. It isn't a gene, but rather just the way the birds happen to look.
 

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Actually the third bar does seem to be under genetic control and it appears to be a dominant, but no one that I know of has actually done work with it (I'm more than willing to be corrected wtih this if someone knows if Gibson or others have tied it down more closely)
 

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Hmm. I've never heard anything about it other than one of those modifiers making it look like a 3rd bar (even if it's just a little bit of a bar). But I have wondered about it, because I know of some families of birds that has a LOT of the half bars above the normal two.
 

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some thoughts on third bars

Hey guys

I think most of what we see here in the US is what looks like the start of a third bar when it is more likely the start of a check pattern probably in het check or light check birds. I don't know this, it's just a guess because I've never seen a good third bar other than on a wild pigeon. I have heard of third bar birds in the US, just can't think of a good example that I've seen. Snow pigeons have third bars. There might be another wild pigeon that has third bars as well, just can't think of any. Does this mean that another species is responsible for putting it into domestic pigeons? Personally, I would not be surprised if this is the case but not many people care for this idea. There are at least some who feel that the barless gene came from some type of wood pigeons. I know there is some controversey over whether it belongs in the same series with t pattern, check and bar. It is clearly recessive to the higher patterns and that's about all we know for sure.

Bill
 
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