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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Just to mention, as you all must be aware that my loft is having a outbreak at the moment. I think this started when i got to lazy to go to the beach to bring sand. Sea sand i believe has many good propeties.

1) Salty sand acts as agent against diseases
2) Pigeons love to eat it. i think its like grit
3) small shells contain calcium
4) easy to sweep off pigeon poop
5) acts like a cushion for large breeds like kings when they fly down.
6) good base for the nest bowls.

i plan to go to the beach tomorrow to get some bucketfuls

warriec
 

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When I was 10 years old my father built a coop and we used sand for the floor. It was very easy to clean as we sifted the poop out, but we added more beach sand every month. We didn't have much rain and when we did the sand dried quickly. The portion where the birds enclosure was didn't get wet at all. The birds really enjoyed picking thru the fresh sand, but they still got supplemental calcium and were allowed to pick in the yard also, after their daily flight.

The loft itself was very airy, had lots of circulation and I only had about 12 pigeons. My birds were the healthiest flying machines on the planet.

That was when we lived in California and the weather was not humid and it didn't rain so much as it does here.

I would never think to use a sand floor here in Florida as the climate is just too humid and wet and the moisture factor would be overwhelming. We have a floor that is several feet off the ground and seems to work just fine. It is plywood and easily scraped and dries quickly in the Florida sun. Even with the hurricanes of 2004 the floors dried quickly, as a result of good air circulation, the sun and maintaining and cleaning the floor up right away and having it off the ground. Our local pigeon club president has had pigeons for 30 years, and he said it was very unhealthy to use the ground or build a floor on the ground in this climate.

I think if you absolutely have to use the ground as floor, then yes, use lots of sand, make sure the floor is always dry, that if it does get wet that it dries quickly, and you have to have very good air circulation thru-out the loft.
It should NEVER be moist or wet within the birds enclosure where they roost at night though. If you cannot keep their floor dry within their coop I would raise their floor off the ground.
 

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What a coincidence for me that this thread was started.

I have mentioned we have problems with worms in our pigeons and have one bird that is staying in the house over winter because of a very bad infestation. This bird (******) has been treated with Pyrentel, Panacur and Ivermectin and, I think, finally has them licked. She weighed the most tonight since we brought her in Thanksgiving Day.

Our problem is that we have a dirt floor in our aviary. We use wood chips on top of that and change the chips out at least every 3-4 weeks and spot change under the perches inbetween. Since we rehab, the original concept was that the birds would be in the aviaries for a short period of time, then released. We were told that a dirt floor would be best. However, even with the best of intentions, we now have about 30 pigeons that we call "keepers" either because of health issues or simply because we grew too fond of them to release. We also have several white pigeons that we don't release because of hawk issues. Our vet believes that over a period of years a worm "colony" has been established in the soil.

Our vet told us a few weeks ago she wanted to talk with a colleague in Oklahoma about our problem. She called me today and said this doctor (who also raises pigeons) advised us not to put in a wood floor. Instead, he suggested we remove at least 1" of soil from the floor and replace with 2" of sand, or, remove 2" soil and replace with 4" of sand, 2 x year. My vet said considering our climate she thinks we should do it more often. Apparently, the constant removal of soil will remove the worm eggs. Her colleague also wants us to continue to use Pyrentel as the wormer of choice. (I didn't think to ask if she discussed Panacur with him but I'm to see her tomorrow and will find out.)

Anyhow, I thought it interesting this thread came up.
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
worms on the wood.

I had worms, not the type inside the bird (hope they werent in and they came out) in the nest box. i used ply wood then. if the dropping is wet and in breeding season where we cant interfere but it became a problem (present). In the past i used seasand as a base on the floor and inside the nest box and had minimal problems. As Treese said, i think where you are located plays a major role. I would suggest that lofts be made so that water does not flow in so that sea sand could be used. what say
 

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Hmmm I'm even short of words over this worm issues on board. Well I suggest you don't put in sand at all and rather use plywood for the floor and make sure it does not get wet and also roof your pigeon loft tight to make sure rain does not ruin inside the loft or cage. #greeting to you folks from me in #west Africa #ghana
 
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