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Discussion Starter · #1 · (Edited)
I am new to homing pigeons and would like to get a little bit of info cleared up. I had a pair of white ringneck doves. I had gotten them from a breeder in Arizona. I had the doves for about a year and a half, but one day they sadly flew out of the open sliding door. I was devestated :(. I then heard about homing pigeons from my Ag. teacher. I contacted the breeder in Arizona and asked her if homing pigeons were a good idea as pets. I was happy to hear that they make wonderful pets :). However, I have heard from my mom's friend who used to own some homing pigeons that they have too many babies. She also said that her loft got invaded by wild pigeons, and that they would get into her loft. I have done quite a bit of research and have never read a case where this has happened. Can anyone tell me if this might be a problem? And as for too many babies, I was wondering if it is a good idea to borrow some of the adult birds from my teacher's loft, breed them and keep the babies. I dont want too many birds up to about 6 or 7. If this is possible I was wondering at wha time should I breed them? I get out for summer break in June and would like the birds to be ready to start their training by then. I want to do this, so I can spend time training the birds. Like I said I only want about 6 or 7 birds, so I want a small loft. I have found this loft that looks good.
http://lcsupply.com/images/shop/product_images/1660/regular_plp.jpg

I was wondering if I could get info on loft designs that are not too big. I am really looking forward to raising these amazing birds.
 

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I am new to homing pigeons and would like to get a little bit of info cleared up. I had a pair of white ringneck doves. I had gotten them from a breeder in Arizona. I had the doves for about a year and a half, but one day they sadly flew out of the open sliding door. I was devestated :(. I then heard about homing pigeons from my Ag. teacher. I contacted the breeder in Arizona and asked her if homing pigeons were a good idea as pets. I was happy to hear that they make wonderful pets :). However, I have heard from my mom's friend who used to own some homing pigeons that they have too many babies. She also said that her loft got invaded by wild pigeons, and that they would get into her loft. I have done quite a bit of research and have never read a case where this has happened. Can anyone tell me if this might be a problem? And as for too many babies, I was wondering if it is a good idea to borrow some of the adult birds from my teacher's loft, breed them and keep the babies. I dont want too many birds up to about 6 or 7. If this is possible I was wondering at wha time should I breed them? I get out for summer break in June and would like the birds to be ready to start their training by then. I want to do this, so I can spend time training the birds. Like I said I only want about 6 or 7 birds, so I want a small loft. I have found this loft that looks good.
http://lcsupply.com/images/shop/product_images/1660/regular_plp.jpg

I was wondering if I could get info on loft designs that are not too big. I am really looking forward to raising these amazing birds.
To keep the population down, when they lay eggs take them away and replace them with wooden eggs.
 

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If you want to start training in June then your eggs should have already hatched.

Instead of borrowing adults birds from your teacher see if your teacher will give you babies just weaned from the nest. Also since you only want six or seven, training will not be to big an issue. Just loft fly and trap train until you get all the birds you want, then begin the road trips.

Just be careful, you only wanted six but then you fall in love with em and then want more!
 

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Welcome, looks like another member in Northern California! :D We have a lot around here but I believe most of us have rescues and not flying homers. If you decide to keep "prisoner" birds instead (kept in an aviary and not allowed to fly free), let me know, I have plenty for adoption! ;) Please explore the threats to free-flying birds, especially high-risk if kept in a small flock of under ten birds (as I understand it). I'm not trying to discourage you at all, but rather help you find out ahead of time rather than after losing a bird to a hawk, heaven forbid. Pigeons are wonderful pets and a lot of fun to care for. Please feel free to ask any questions you may have.
 
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