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Discussion Starter #1
Hey folks, it's been a while.

Just wanted to ask a question. Some pigeons have been building a nest under the eaves of the roof of the townhouse where I live. They've been doing this for about... 4 years or so(I lost track). Anyway they came back sometime ago and have another nest, I can't see it other than a few sticks and I've heard them. Anyway, they've been getting pretty bold and have been coming on the balcony.

Keep in mind I haven't been feeding them or anything and the only way I've been able to tell they've been out there is because there's feathers and... other evidence.

I can't access the nest since it's in a spot where a person would need an extra long ladder. Plus, in previous seasons where I knocked down the sticks and such they just come back and replace them and at the moment I can't get an exterminator or somebody to put up chicken wire or something else to prevent them from coming back.

One of my dogs goes out on the balcony regularly and I don't want him sniffing the feathers and such and then coming back into the house.


When I've had pigeon related problems before I called animal control but they don't deal with them. Also, some exterminators poison them.:(:eek:

Point is, I don't have a lot of options but anyway... does anybody have any suggestions for getting pigeons to stay off a balcony?

I mean in a humane way.
 

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Why are you worried about your dog sniffing feathers and poop? He can't get sick from just that and neither will you/your family. My cats eat my pet doves' feathers off the floor all the time. Dogs and cats are made to eat much worse things.

What is really concerning you here that makes you want them to leave after so long? Is it just disease? (Btw--if they're raising babies at your house this long, they are probably pretty healthy. At least as healthy as all of your other backyard birds.)

If you really want them gone, you'll have to wait till whatever babies they're raising right now have learned to fly and been weaned and then get up there on a borrowed ladder and put something up to keep them away from their favored nesting spot. (For instance--hardware cloth would work nicely. Avoid netting, as they can get tangled up in it in some cases.) Even then, I can't guarantee you that they won't find another spot near your house.
 

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Discussion Starter #4
Thanks for the tip, they normally use that spot twice a year any other time the place is empty.

I don't mind them being up there but I live in a household where if my dogs or anybody for that matter comes in contact with feathers and such from wild birds that a person can possibly get sick.

I've seen some houses that have mesh wire or spikes to prevent pigeons from roosting and building nests. I don't know what the price tag is for installation so that'd be something I'd have to look into.
 

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just them them live there, if they have been for 4 years dont kill them thats cruel and you cant get sick from feathers alone, what are you so worried about?
 

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Discussion Starter #6
It's not me so much that's worried, it's my mom. I'd never kill the birds or anything like that, the only humane way I know of to prevent them from going up there is putting up some mesh wire or spikes. I'd never poison them like some exterminators do.
 

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It's not me so much that's worried, it's my mom. I'd never kill the birds or anything like that, the only humane way I know of to prevent them from going up there is putting up some mesh wire or spikes. I'd never poison them like some exterminators do.
Spikes do kill birds sometimes. Go with a metal mesh that is very solid so that it doesn't wrap around any birds' feet. Also avoid loose wires of any type. They can get stuck around birds' legs and cause severe wounds or even loss of the limb.

I think the chicken wire idea is a good one. I don't see why it would be all that hard to install on your own. Oh, and just to forewarn you--any extermination service you hire to install anti-pigeon anything is going to majorly exaggerate the dangers for your health from the birds so that you buy their product. Trust them as much as you would a used car salesman and remember that a pigeon is only as dangerous as a songbird. (Basically, they can only make you sick with close/constant exposure--not the kind you're getting--and only if you have a compromised immune system like if you had AIDS.)
 

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If you put up "pigeon spikes" you have to realize that they can pierce the feet of pigeons (and other birds, and other climbing mammals by the way), which can lead to a nasty infection of the foot and may doom that bird or animal to a slow and agonizing death by said infection. Although there is no fool proof way to pigeon control, meshing is much more humane. Quite frankly, I find it hard to understand why you can't just relax and enjoy watching the parents raise up their young, rather than worrying so about it. After the young leave, as previously stated, then put up the mesh?
 

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Discussion Starter #11
Good point, as for climbing mammals,as far as I know there aren't any squirrels in Nevada, just dessert chipmunks which stay on the ground.

Again, I like pigeons and don't mind them being around, it's just my Mom who isn't a big fan of them being on the balcony.

I haven't seen any new feathers or heard anything outside so they might've already left for the season.

It rained recently but the sticks and such are still intact.
 

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If you put up "pigeon spikes" you have to realize that they can pierce the feet of pigeons (and other birds, and other climbing mammals by the way), which can lead to a nasty infection of the foot and may doom that bird or animal to a slow and agonizing death by said infection. Although there is no fool proof way to pigeon control, meshing is much more humane. Quite frankly, I find it hard to understand why you can't just relax and enjoy watching the parents raise up their young, rather than worrying so about it. After the young leave, as previously stated, then put up the mesh?
If put up PROPERLY & the correct type and length used, Spikes will not harm the birds, they merely prevent them from landing.
 

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If put up PROPERLY & the correct type and length used, Spikes will not harm the birds, they merely prevent them from landing.
I know, but I've seen enough of them put up incorrectly and injuring birds that I still think it's safer to use wire mesh. I've seen them impale birds around town here. :(
 

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Discussion Starter #14
If put up PROPERLY & the correct type and length used, Spikes will not harm the birds, they merely prevent them from landing.
I think you're right, not dismissing what Libris said, but I have seen a pigeon try to land on a building with spikes and the bird just hovered over them for a few seconds before flying off.

I wouldn't even try one of those fake owls some people put up. It doesn't take long for pigeons to figure out it's not real.
 

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I think you're right, not dismissing what Libris said, but I have seen a pigeon try to land on a building with spikes and the bird just hovered over them for a few seconds before flying off.
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If they are mounted correctly, that is exactly what is supposed to happen.
If they are mounted with too much spacing (usually to cut down on costs), or the spikes are too short, then thats when birds can get injured, normally either on feet or wings.

This pic always amused me, "the look of defiance"

the rows of spikes are just a bit too far apart.
 

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