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Sadly, I have never seen a picture of such a bird.

I would assume it would be mostly white (or mostly yellowish - if RR or bronze is involved) with some black flecking, as well as some ash break. I personally prefer almonds with a lot of nice dark break, to contrast with the almond / grey / white ground color, which would probably not be the case for the genotype in question.

As posted previously on this forum, it is often difficult to discern ash-red based almonds from blue based ones (since it depends - at least in males - on whether the ash-red and almonds are on the same chromosome or not).
 

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Thanks Rudolph. I will post here our bird.....or see Frillbacklover's post "Growing up Frillback". This almond appears to be dilute but that does not make sense. The same parents recently hatched a non-almond "lavender" (ash plus spread) which DOES make sense so we were thinking this earlier almond might be almond on top of "lavender". Fits your description too (and the bird does have rec. red underneath).
 

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Thanks Rudolph. I will post here our bird.....or see Frillbacklover's post "Growing up Frillback".
I will have a look at the post. A picture here would be great though!

This almond appears to be dilute but that does not make sense.
One of the problems with almonds is the fact that it makes it impossible to see the usual suspects (like short down for dilute and washed out tail bar for indigo) when creating interesting combinations of genes.

The same parents recently hatched a non-almond "lavender" (ash plus spread) which DOES make sense so we were thinking this earlier almond might be almond on top of "lavender". Fits your description too (and the bird does have rec. red underneath).
Your bird could very well be an ash-red spread almond then. Though crossover might have had to happen (depending on the sex of the ash-red parent). Crossover between St and B locus is not very common if I remember correctly.

Since the bird is still young, you might be able to see more definite tell tale signs when the break increases (as it always does with age).
 
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