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Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
Hi everyone. I have a pigeon that has a drooping left wing. She's inactive and rarely eats. When I feel her crop at the end of the day, I find VERY LITTLE food, but surprisingly I never see her eat. Could the little food be passed to her by her friend? She's only active when her male pigeon friend is taking active part in billing with her. Most of the times she's sitting in a corner fluffed up. She's so light weighted. But otherwise she looks fine when her friend approaches her and when I hold her. She's survived so far like this for over a week now. She looks young. So not very good at flight. But she manages small flights from roof to roof. I even try to force feed her everyday atleast once hoping she'd be okay and well and eating by herself and get active by the next day. What could possibly be the reason? What can I do? Am I looking at the possible signs of some illness? Please help. I don't know what to do. Any advice is greatly appreciated. Thanks a lot for any suggestions.
-Ash
 

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Hi everyone. I have a pigeon that has a drooping left wing. She's inactive and rarely eats. When I feel her crop at the end of the day, I find VERY LITTLE food, but surprisingly I never see her eat. Could the little food be passed to her by her friend?

It's possible....do you leave food out for them all the time? If yes, they don't seem to 'tank up' the way a bird with more controlled feedings would.

She's only active when her male pigeon friend is taking active part in billing with her. Most of the times she's sitting in a corner fluffed up. She's so light weighted.

If you can bring the bird 'in', that is, get this bird into a cage (think hospital room) it would be good for the bird's sake. You may need to continue and increase the supplemental feedings to the bird's self-feeding if you don't want to lose her...

But otherwise she looks fine when her friend approaches her and when I hold her. She's survived so far like this for over a week now. She looks young. So not very good at flight. But she manages small flights from roof to roof. I even try to force feed her everyday atleast once hoping she'd be okay and well and eating by herself and get active by the next day. What could possibly be the reason? What can I do? Am I looking at the possible signs of some illness? Please help. I don't know what to do. Any advice is greatly appreciated. Thanks a lot for any suggestions.
-Ash
If you can post a couple of pictures of the bird/wing it would be helpful. A drooping wing can be a sign of injury or illness. Also, examine the wing and look/feel for lumps on the wing itself...don't forget to also check the underside of the wing for lumps. Let's start there....
 

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Discussion Starter #3
Thanks feralpigeon. I will try and upload pics asap. I'm worried watching her not eat. What supplements do you think should I be providing her with at this stage with this condition? Much thanks.
-Ash
 

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Discussion Starter #5
Okay. But I'm afraid she doesn't digest many things well. That day I fed her seeds. They came out intact. Even small pieces of garlic! Should her digestive system be not functioning properly, what should I do and what digestible should I feed her?
 

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If she doesn't eat is not because she's not hungry but because has a digestive problem. The digestive problems that impede a bird to feed falls mostly in three categories:


- mouth and throat problems, often caused by growths of canker, which are visible as yellow lumps in mouth or throat or palpable on the neck

- crop and gissard problems: food not passing from crop into proventriculus (the canal between crop and gissard), caused by candida growths, or (according to some authors) by canker nodules near the proventriculus, or by some foreign body (ingested object) in crop or gissard etc

- bowel problems, the infestation of bowel walls with pathogens. The pathogens can be bacterias (e. coli or salmonella usually), coccidia, canker, worms. All these pathogens perforate the bowel walls and make the absorbtion of solid food hard or impossible. The droppings become aqueous and change their normal color to green, yellow (when the liver is also affected) or other anormal color. Even if the pathogen is killed with medicines, the damage of the bowel may persist a time and in some cases, may remain permanent.



The solution is to feed the bird liquid food using the technique of crop feeding, which requires an experience which comes only by learning from someone who practiced for some time. Here is a page that gives the theoretical indications but the practice may rise many problems and even deadly dangers:
http://www.pigeoncote.com/vet/feedbaby/feedbaby.html
 

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Hi Ash,

I think you would do well getting a small bag of high quality puppy kibble. It may sound strange but the nutrition is similar and it works in a pinch. Put maybe 12-16 pieces of kibble in a bowl of water with a pinch of salt and sugar mixed into water and allow the kibble to soften with the water...but not so much they completely fall apart. You want them to absorb water and soften but still hold on to their form.

Get the bird and wrap a small towel around the bird to immobilize the wings, the head should poke out of the top. Take one hand and wrap it around the
back/top of the head so that the thumb is at the corner of the beak on one side and index and/or middle finger is likewise at the corner of the beak on the opposite side. With your other hand take your index finger and place it on the tip of the upper mandible (beak) and push the beak upward so that the mouth is open. Once open, gently apply pressure with the other hand at the corners of the beak so that the beak will remain open.

Now take a kibble or piece of kibble and push it to the back of the bird's mouth (I use baby finger) and release beak long enough so that the bird can swallow on its own. Repeat until the hen has consumed enough to expand the crop (sac like part of the bird just below throat) without it appearing to bulge.

I'm saying 12 to 16 pieces for now because I don't know the size of the kibble you will find to purchase and feeding less a little more frequently is better in a bird that hasn't been eating. Do these feedings with your pigeon at least a.m./p.m. for now...but do check the crop to make sure it is emptying. You can do this by gently feeling in the front.

Let us know how it goes. Also, are you able to get medicine for the bird?
 

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Discussion Starter #8
Feralpigeon, thanks for the reply. The problem is we do not have a proper pet store or a vet clinic here. We do have one vet clinic, but it isn't equipped with most of the essential things required. But I'll go try to find it first thing in the morning. What are the alternatives for the food you mentioned, if any, in case I don't find it?
 

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Feralpigeon, thanks for the reply. The problem is we do not have a proper pet store or a vet clinic here. We do have one vet clinic, but it isn't equipped with most of the essential things required. But I'll go try to find it first thing in the morning. What are the alternatives for the food you mentioned, if any, in case I don't find it?
Your welcome Ash. I know folks in India must have pet dogs and cats, or...? Puppy kibble is essentially the same as dog kibble except it is fortified with a level of vitamins and minerals that a growing puppy needs to build a healthy adult body. I'm not talking about a high protein or meat content. In your case, grain based/and low protein let's say between 16% and 20% is fine. The reason I'm suggesting this method is that it will be easier for you than trying to crop feed and once soaked will be easier for your hen to digest than corn or peas....i.e.no skin. Also easier than seeds for the bird to digest in her diminished capacity.

Perhaps call and ask the vet clinic where you can buy puppy kibble? At the same time you may as well ask them if you can get some Metronidazole.
While we don't know exactly what is going on with your hen, Metronidazole,
when given as an antibiotic (twice daily) will treat anaerobic infections and
Protozoal (Trichomonas/Canker) infections. Coccidiosis and worms wil also cause the damage that AndreiS was describing, if your vet clinic is willing to worm the bird and give a sulpha med for the coccidiosis, that would be great.

Also, Skyeking's suggestion of a calcium supplement with D3 is really a requirement to have on hand when keeping a hen as a pet.

Good luck, Ash, please keep us posted as to your hen's health.
 

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Discussion Starter #10
Pictures...

Thank you tons, feralpigeon. Whoever asked for the pics, here's the pics of the left drooping wing and the poo of my-supposed-to-be-ill Timmy. The one on the right is its poo... that's all I could get for now. and on the left is pieces of the food she vomitted. She does that everytime. She usually either vomits out the food that I feed her... or she poops them out undigested. Its strange. I tried to get some electrolytes into her system cuz I'm worried sick :( I'll try carrying out what all others suggested. Going through hell trying to find all the feed and meds and supplements. More than half the meds and supplements suggested by the forum members is not available in the only vet clinic ***/pet store here. But thanks everyone. Any more advices is greatly welcome and appreciated. Thanks again, everyone :)
 

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Discussion Starter #11
If you can post a couple of pictures of the bird/wing it would be helpful. A drooping wing can be a sign of injury or illness. Also, examine the wing and look/feel for lumps on the wing itself...don't forget to also check the underside of the wing for lumps. Let's start there....
There are no lumps. I checked. Also. Please check out the photo.
 

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Discussion Starter #12
I noticed her imitating her male friend while eating. She seems to like mustard and seasame seeds a lot. Wherever he pecks, she pecks too actively imitating him. And drinks lots of water. I provided a mix of vitamins and calcium in the water.
 

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Is it okay to mix two or more supplements together in the water? Should I provide them calcium, vitamins, minerals and protein supplements daily? Or like once in a week?
 

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Its looks like some sort of physical injury to the wing.
Sorry the pic of droppings isn't clear and hard to say about the wing too.
As has been advised please keep the pigeon contained.
Check the inside of the throat with a flash light to see any unusual growth or color like if its pale/white. The throat must otherwise be of rosy pink color.
Post the clear pics of the droppings again
 

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The green color of feces shows some disturbance.


Recently a bird died to me after similar droppings and regular vomiting. I'm not sure about the cause of the dead, it can be either that he aspirated the liquid food from crop, or can be a sepsis (he was badly injured by predator and was presenting signs of genelarized bacterial infection).


Your bird suffers from crop blockage, which in my opinion most likely is caused in this case by candida, or canker, or both. So I would give her Nystatin, 250,000 units (half a tablet) two times / day, crushed and mixed well with water. Also, around 35 mg metronidazole (if she weights around 200,000 as I suppose) every day for 5-7 days. Combat the toxicity of metronidazole with B vitamins and hepatoprotective supplement (NOT hepatoprotective for humans, only for animals).
 

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I noticed her imitating her male friend while eating. She seems to like mustard and seasame seeds a lot. Wherever he pecks, she pecks too actively imitating him. And drinks lots of water. I provided a mix of vitamins and calcium in the water.
Hi Ash,

1. Mustard seeds have a medicinal value. In addition to anti-fungal and anti-bacterial properties, the mustard seed is used medicinally as an
emetic (induces vomiting).

2. The reason that I suggested you isolate the hen in a cage were multiple:

a. Medical professionals always instruct caregivers to isolate a sick bird so that other birds will not contract what the sick bird has.
b. Isolating provides a safe environment for the sick bird, the previous environment potentially being part of the problem. If your bird is pecking around in dirt for wild seeds, it is being exposed to the possibilty of worm and coccidial overburden by ingestion. These organisms do live in the dirt.
c. Isolating a bird will remove part of the 'guessing game' while providing you a better observation advantage and the bird a much needed rest. The hen needs its reserves to get through the health crisis.

**If you don't have a cage, put newspapers in a corner somewhere (you can waterproof by putting plastic-cut open a trash liner-underneath the layer of newspaper and then turn a plastic laundry basket over......or, get a cardboard box..suggestions here, I know you can figure something suitable out!

3. I couldn't get much out of the dropping pictures. The picture of the bird itself, although a snapshot in time, looks like she has some 'lobster back' going on, i.e., possible egg binding (which doesn't rule out other issues as your hen is foraging in dirt).

http://www.peteducation.com/article.cfm?c=15+1829&aid=2418

http://beautyofbirds.com/eggbinding.html

If as a human, you wanted liquid calcium as a supplement, where would you go to get it? Please get some for starters..liquid, not pill, and get some into the bird.

And, finally, did you speak with the vet clinic?
 

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Am sorry for your loss. I know you tried everything you could. I know you kept her comfortable and your caring meant a lot to her.
 

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So sorry to hear about her. You should talk to the guy from whom you've bought her. He sold you a sick bird. Be cautious in the future
 

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Discussion Starter #20
Thanks cwebster. But I kinda feel guilty for not having spent more time with her and therefore not being able to notice the early signs of illness in the earlier stages. I kinda feel she could've been saved. Now I observe my birds closer than ever. Hopefully things will go well with her remaining three friends she left behind. Two of them are a couple and I'm expecting eggs soon as they've started collecting twigs and hay in small amounts today. The one left was her friend she used to spend time with. He was the only one nice to her and who took care of her and spent time with her when she was sick, he kept her kinda active. Gotta love him.
 
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