Pigeon-Talk banner

1 - 18 of 18 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
163 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
As I dive deeper into the world of pigeon owning, I can't help but consider my future in the hobby. While I have a small flock of pets now, I admit that the lure of racing is there, and may be something I work up to sooner or later. It has been the topic of several late night conversations in my household.

I am wondering about the disadvantage of my location, particularly where racing is concerned.
I live in the finger lakes region of New York state, to be more precise, directly on the 10 to 15 mile wide strip of land between Seneca and Cayuga lakes, the two largest of the finger lakes.

Each lake stretches 20 miles north, and 20 miles south, give or take a few miles.
Cayuga lake is slightly wider than Seneca, averaging just under 2 miles wide, and 3.5 miles wide at its' widest point. Seneca is slightly slimmer, being about 3 miles wide at it's widest point. On most days the other side of the lake is quite visible from any point, barring rain or fog.

How likely is it that, if I should get my hands into racing, that I would be put at a disadvantage due to my inter-lake location? Would quality birds with high drive choose to fly the few miles across the water, or might my birds instead choose to fly the extra 40 miles around to fly over land?

If in the case some choose to fly across , while others choose to go around perhaps this could make for a very interesting breeding experiment. It would be quite easy to use a boat to do training tosses on the opposite sides of the lakes and sort out the bold from the timid. Would it be possible to begin breeding for the boldness to cross these bodies of water? Or would genetics have little to do with my predicament?

I would just like to know everyone's thoughts on this. Unusual questions, for an unusual geographic location. But it's been in the back of my head for awhile now, and with no experience of my own to draw upon I ask for the benefit of yours. Thanks guys, any thoughts appreciated!:)
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,412 Posts
TBH I dont think living by a lake would harm you at all.
They have pigeons that race across the english channel.
I would think that the lake might help you a bit as its a landmark that can be easily seen from the sky.
Hopefully people with more knowledge on this subject will post.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,504 Posts
You should try and see. Trained birds are not afraid of long distances 900 km and more. Maybe it is good idea to toss them from the boat just to learn the way. I don't race but there are GPS trackers for birds that you can follow exact route of the bird back home.
Noah used pigeon ower the water as far as I know.:)
 

·
Guardian Angel
Joined
·
10,523 Posts
While I cannot offer any pertinent information about flying over water (although, from what you mentioned, those lakes do not sound like they would be a problem), I just wanted to say HI!

AND, mention that I lived in the Finger Lakes region many years ago when my Dad was in the Air Force. We lived for a short time at Sampson AFB, ON the lake. What a BEAUTIFUL AREA! I still have a small gray stone I found along the shore with a hole completely through it.

I remember winters and sledding on snow down our backyard hill from our road alllllll the way to the edge of the lake! This was in the late '40s/very early '50s. Thanks for bringing back some memories of a bygone time!

ALL THE BEST if you decide to race!

Love and Hugs
Shi :)
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
163 Posts
Discussion Starter #5
Thank you stoned, They definitely would make a great landmark...They are hard to miss that's for sure.


You should try and see. Trained birds are not afraid of long distances 900 km and more. Maybe it is good idea to toss them from the boat just to learn the way. I don't race but there are GPS trackers for birds that you can follow exact route of the bird back home.
Noah used pigeon ower the water as far as I know.:)
Interesting idea! I never really thought of tossing them from the boat...train them to fly over water...so obvious and yet I never thought of it even once. Could even vary the distance out into the lakes, and work up to tossing from the opposite side from home, and teach them from the start to not back down. Very cool.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
163 Posts
Discussion Starter #6
While I cannot offer any pertinent information about flying over water (although, from what you mentioned, those lakes do not sound like they would be a problem), I just wanted to say HI!

AND, mention that I lived in the Finger Lakes region many years ago when my Dad was in the Air Force. We lived for a short time at Sampson AFB, ON the lake. What a BEAUTIFUL AREA! I still have a small gray stone I found along the shore with a hole completely through it.

ALL THE BEST if you decide to race.

Love and Hugs
Shi :)
Nice! Sampson is just a few miles down the road from here, not only did you live in the area, you lived in pretty much the exact same town.
It is beautiful here, funny that this is the first and probably the only time I have ever thought that our lakes might be a disadvantage:D

You have a lucky stone! They are plentiful here, I have jars full of them all over the house, you can never have too much luck ya know!?! I hope it brings you luck!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,412 Posts
Thank you stoned, They definitely would make a great landmark...They are hard to miss that's for sure.




Interesting idea! I never really thought of tossing them from the boat...train them to fly over water...so obvious and yet I never thought of it even once. Could even vary the distance out into the lakes, and work up to tossing from the opposite side from home, and teach them from the start to not back down. Very cool.
VERY VERY good idea!!!
I never thought of it also.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
20,301 Posts
I do not race but I do take my homers down the road and my home and loft are surounded by a large reservoir, I thought that could be an issue but so far it has not been and even as said, I think it is a big land mark for them.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,138 Posts
I don't think it would hurt a bit with that small of a body of water. Now if we are talking lake Michigan that is different. You might even have good luck and it be somewhat of an advantage. I will tell you why a bird could cover that lake with out even blinking a eye and the advantage is it could see it for maybe 100 miles away. So when the bird is coming home and it can fly right towards the lake on a straight line it will be easy for them. You better start racing and collect all your winnings. :D
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,321 Posts
The only problem I see is fog, having lived on a lake fog would sometimes set in and make it hard for the birds to spot landmarks. Because you are between two lakes fog can become twice the problem. Now that being said, your birds will grow up with it and might become better homers because of it. Time and training is the only way to know.

Good Luck,
Tony
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
11,455 Posts
Considering one of the things pigeons use to help guide them home, is landmarks, bodies of water can be an advantage :) Lakes and rivers, major roads, highways, and railroads, rides and treelines, and probably anything distinctive that sticks up pretty high that they could see from a long distance.
I don't think pigeons will mind flying over water. Although, if they are tired, they would probably prefer flying over solid land in case they have to take a break. Some birds will go down for water as well on the long, hot races.

If you get the birds used to flying "though" it instead of around it, then I don't see that hurting anything :)
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
11,455 Posts
The only problem I see is fog, having lived on a lake fog would sometimes set in and make it hard for the birds to spot landmarks. Because you are between two lakes fog can become twice the problem. Now that being said, your birds will grow up with it and might become better homers because of it. Time and training is the only way to know.

Good Luck,
Tony
I think in this case it could actually help, since they'll probably have to live with it quite a bit as they're growing up. Hopefully will teach them not just to rely on sight and landmarks, but their other senses as well. Overall, leaving you with the smartest birds, in theory.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
790 Posts
Just toss train them slowly and increase te distance as you see fit. Like someone said it here.. take them on a boat and toss them while in the middle of the lake. This will get them used to flying over the lake. Here in the Hawaiian Islands... birds fly over miles of ocean..

Here's a race map to give you an idea.

 

·
Registered
Joined
·
13 Posts
I am from New Zealand, and if you care to look at an Atlas you will see the country consists of two main islands, seperated by a a stretch of ocean.
Pigeons are raced every week North to South, or South to North.

Pigeons are very capable of flying over water with no prior preperation.
It is well worth researching the War Pigeons which performed such amazing feats during the First and Second World Wars. This will show just what our birds are capable of, given the opportunity.

I think we are too inclined to "baby" them. We might be surprised at what they can do.....
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
5,367 Posts
As I dive deeper into the world of pigeon owning, I can't help but consider my future in the hobby. While I have a small flock of pets now, I admit that the lure of racing is there, and may be something I work up to sooner or later. It has been the topic of several late night conversations in my household.

I am wondering about the disadvantage of my location, particularly where racing is concerned.
I live in the finger lakes region of New York state, to be more precise, directly on the 10 to 15 mile wide strip of land between Seneca and Cayuga lakes, the two largest of the finger lakes.

Each lake stretches 20 miles north, and 20 miles south, give or take a few miles.
Cayuga lake is slightly wider than Seneca, averaging just under 2 miles wide, and 3.5 miles wide at its' widest point. Seneca is slightly slimmer, being about 3 miles wide at it's widest point. On most days the other side of the lake is quite visible from any point, barring rain or fog.

How likely is it that, if I should get my hands into racing, that I would be put at a disadvantage due to my inter-lake location? Would quality birds with high drive choose to fly the few miles across the water, or might my birds instead choose to fly the extra 40 miles around to fly over land?

If in the case some choose to fly across , while others choose to go around perhaps this could make for a very interesting breeding experiment. It would be quite easy to use a boat to do training tosses on the opposite sides of the lakes and sort out the bold from the timid. Would it be possible to begin breeding for the boldness to cross these bodies of water? Or would genetics have little to do with my predicament?

I would just like to know everyone's thoughts on this. Unusual questions, for an unusual geographic location. But it's been in the back of my head for awhile now, and with no experience of my own to draw upon I ask for the benefit of yours. Thanks guys, any thoughts appreciated!:)
The disadvantages from my perspective, have nothing to do with a few miles of water. The location of your club, now if that is a 100 miles away, that could be an issue. If you live in an apartment building, that could cause some issues. But, a few miles of water ? Say, less then 150 miles of open ocean, should not be an issue at all. And a 3.5 mile body of water ? Heck they can see the other side. Your biggest issue IMHO, will be, how to keep and maintain a healthy colony of birds. Many, if not most, do not lose races before of very poor quality genes, they lose because of their loft and/or management.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
163 Posts
Discussion Starter #16
Thanks for the insight guys. Good to know that the door is open to expand my interests :)
 

·
Guardian Angel
Joined
·
4,163 Posts
Hi BELLA, There is one thing that I would like to point out that the finger lakes run north and south now if you are in a club that races out the west the birds would have to fly across the lakes,but if the races is coming from the south your birds may not need to cross over the lakes.Find out where the race stations of the club/combine that you would be flying with are, in fact the lakes may be a good landmark. GEORGE;)
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
5,367 Posts
Hi BELLA, There is one thing that I would like to point out that the finger lakes run north and south now if you are in a club that races out the west the birds would have to fly across the lakes,but if the races is coming from the south your birds may not need to cross over the lakes.Find out where the race stations of the club/combine that you would be flying with are, in fact the lakes may be a good landmark. GEORGE;)
George is Right. Depending on your location relative to the race stations, the lakes could actually be an advantage, depending on where your other club members are located. Most ideal situation would be the whole flock flies over your house first, and your birds drop into the clock. The rest of the flock then continues to circle your home for the next 1/2 hour or more, stressed over the idea of crossing a big lake. ;)

I would set out food and water for them, if that is the case. Let them eat and rest a bit, before they continue on to your club members. Your fellow members will love you for it. :p
 
1 - 18 of 18 Posts
Top