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I'm new to keeping pigeons, and I have a pair of rollers I want to breed. I must admit I am totally lost. I have not found a good book on the subject of breeding.

The pair I bought are supposedly "proven," and have already mated and have had offspring before. I have them in my loft with my other 3 rollers. Should I get a breeder box and isolate them there?

If so, how long would I normally want to keep them isolated in a breeder box? Until she lays, after they mate, or after the eggs hatch?

I understand the point of isolating them, in that you want to control which 2 birds mate, but after they mate then what? Is there any point of keeping them confined after the hen lays?
 

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If they are a mated pair, can't you just give them a nest box without isolating them?
 

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I'm new to keeping pigeons, and I have a pair of rollers I want to breed. I must admit I am totally lost. I have not found a good book on the subject of breeding.

The pair I bought are supposedly "proven," and have already mated and have had offspring before. I have them in my loft with my other 3 rollers. Should I get a breeder box and isolate them there?

If so, how long would I normally want to keep them isolated in a breeder box? Until she lays, after they mate, or after the eggs hatch?

I understand the point of isolating them, in that you want to control which 2 birds mate, but after they mate then what? Is there any point of keeping them confined after the hen lays?
having nest boxes in the loft will give them the incentive they need to breed and lay and hatch, you supply the nest box, the nest bowl and material to build a nest and they will do the rest. If they are a proven pair they have already paired up, so no need to isolate them, unless the other birds cause trouble for the pair's babies. they will mate and make a nest and lay on their own time schedule. it takes a few weeks for new birds to settle in also.
 

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You can choose to do that, but most people who do this are the people who race homers or breed other birds for competition.

In the nest box you'll isolate them in, you'll want a bowl and nesting material of some sort for them to build the nest and lay in. It takes a while for them to settle in. Once they have laid their eggs, you can open up the box for them to go about the loft as they please. Keeping them in the nest box will help insure the babies are from that pair and no crossing has been going on.

This is if the nest boxes are big enough to house two birds, and if they are inside the loft. If the other three rolls are not old enough to mate or haven't showed any dominance to the pair, then I wouldn't worry about it. It's usually the more alpha birds that sneak in to mate with other hens.

As long as there are boxes and/or bowls in the loft for the birds to choose from, you won't need to lock them together, as they will choose their own space to nest.
 
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