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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I have a male horseman pouter and I want to train him to come back to the coop once let out. Its his first year and he's my only bird but i'm getting him a female can you tell me how to train him i'm afraid to let him out because he might fly away and he does'nt trust me.Thanks!
 

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Was He Born In Your Place,is He A Young Bird,if He Is You Need To Let Him Get Use To The Surounding Area By Placing Him In A Cage Like For A Few Days Keep Him A Little Hungry And Every Time You Feed Him Call Him,after That You Have To Make Sure That He Is Flying Aroun For At Lease 45 Mnts Than You Can Start Taking Him On The Road Littlt Bit At A Time,now Pigeons Dont Really Like To Fly By Them Selves,if He Is A Older Bird Born Somewere Else Is Been Done Before But Better Breed From Hin And Fly The Young Ones Good Luck.
 

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Sure, if you want to raise the babies by hand if he takes off on you. It isn't safe to let a pigeon out to fly by himself. A hawk or something will likely get him. They are safer flown in flocks.
 

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But Ill have a female to do the job. is there any other way? can you give me step by step?Thanks.
I think you need to read up on pigeons more. The female will not always raise the babies alone. After a couple of weeks, the male is normally feeding them while the female is sitting on more eggs. Some birds will raise them alone, and some won't.
 

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I think you need to read up on pigeons more.
You also need to read and take in information from replies that are made to your topics, and more importantly to understand them.

Sure, if you want to raise the babies by hand if he takes off on you. It isn't safe to let a pigeon out to fly by himself. A hawk or something will likely get him. They are safer flown in flocks.
Yeah but I'd let him out on the first round of babies but anyway you're saying free flying is a no go.
I'm not trying to be nasty, but from your questions asked in the forum so far and your lack of even basic knowlege on keeping pigeons in general, If you do get it a female, I certainly would not let them breed till you properly learn and can adequately understand the basics.
Youngsters are very demanding, and need care & attention from not just the parent birds, but also from you as an owner.
Everyone is trying to help you, but it is very frustrating when you reply with a comment which only shows that you dont really understand what people are trying to advise.

From your other posts, I can understand the frustration in trying to "tame" your bird, and also make him happy and content.
All birds, like humans and other animals, have different personalities, and it takes a lot of patience on our side to understand them, learn their habits, likes, dislikes etc.. Every bird is different, and some will not conform to what WE want.
If your bird doesnt trust you, then, if you let him out, he may well decide to look elsewhere to live.
If he was not born in your loft, he may well try to go back "home" from whence he came, or even try to live feraly.
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 · (Edited)
But I knew they have two eggs and they raise them together then when those are older they raise two more on an elevated nest so that the first do not crush the second.The male raises the first untill they are weaned. Pigeons defenses are biting wing slaps and angry or scared almost growling coos pigeons will defend their young and it is best advised to examine them while the birds are eating. You should approach a pigeon slowly without sudden movements talking gently.I give him a weekly bath for him to splash in for fun and for a little bit of clean feathers and skin.
 

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Discussion Starter · #11 · (Edited)
Pigeons are fed two times a day 1/3 in the morning and 2/3 at night I feed him once at 12:00 and once at 4:00 I let him at first eat as much in twenty minutes but now I now he eats one table spoon in the morning and one at night. And water is changed 1 to 2 times a day to prevent disease. Grit is needed for proper digestion .I scrape my coop of poop once a day and weekly change bedding and old nesting material I also routinely spray him with mite repellant ( For pigeons) .He has an aviary for exercise and a warm coop to sleep and eat in.I give him safflower and peanuts as snacks.I will not free fly him while nesting for chance of deserting and leaving me care taker of the first round of babies. Food containers must be made in a way that pigeons cannot dirty them. Coops must have protection against predators like rodents raccoons and others at night my coop has two wooden doors and chicken wire to protect him. Some frown on chicken wire but many use it without death as long as you don't have lots of raccoons on my coop for them to get in the would have to climb support pole climb four feet and wrap there legs legs around one of the support poles then rip the wire without the support of his legs then he would need to get through more than 1 1/2 of wood. the breeder I buy from uses the same thing none of his birds have died from predators and he's had them for years. Adults will eat more with babies.grip is needed in nest and if it is not provided your squab can get splayed legs.
 

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Discussion Starter · #12 · (Edited)
A pigeon coop needs to have ventilation but heat in the winter. Lack of ventilation leads to sickness and death so can stress. New birds must be separated for at least three days to relief them of stress. Billing is common among mated pairs and the male will drive the female in to the nest and is jealous of other males and even people who come near her. Banding is to be done at a young age from 5 to 10 days of age. Females can become egg bound which is an egg that cannot come out the egg could break and kill her a warm towel can help and sometimes oil and a Q tip. A pigeon sitting fluffed in a corner and not eating or drinking is most likely sick and should be examined if so a vet should be called and told the symptoms of your bird the bird should be isolated in a warm and spacious cage to prevent further contamination. Birds must have two nesting places one for the first round and one for the other or at least the second must be elevated. Molting happens from about mid_July to december (depending on the bird).
 

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Yeah but I'd let him out on the first round of babies but anyway you're saying free flying is a no go.
What I'm saying is that the females doesn't normally take over the caring for the youngsters at that age. Sometimes they won't raise them by themselves. You may have to hand raise them. Maybe not.
 

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Well some of your information is incorrect. So you need to learn more still.
One thing is that new birds should be separated for like a month, in order to give them time to come down with symptoms if they are going to be sick from something they might be carrying. Otherwise your whole loft could end up sick. Could get very expensive and you can lose birds.

As far as your chicken wire, that is an accident waiting to happen. Sure some use it and are lucky. Others are not so lucky. Not all of those predators come around just at night either. And you would be surprised at how they can get in, and the damage they can do. But you know it all, so good luck. They could come in through the top even, with chicken wire. There are all kinds of predators out there who would love to get at your birds. How much you protect them from that, is up to you. Just a few: snakes, mice, rats, raccoons, hawks, weasels, fisher cats, dogs, cats, and many more. So don't be thinking that you know how they will approach, or how they will try to get in. You don't. But since you know everything you need to know, I'll try to remember to come to you when I have a question or a problem that I need help with, cause I'm sure you'll have the answer. Good to know.
 

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I was talking about your aviary. Dogs don't keep rats away, and if you don't think there are any around, you are foolish. The dogs are not sitting by the loft all day and night either. Guess it is a matter of opinion what is fine. I have tried to warn you about what some have had to experience the hard way. You would rather argue than learn. So good luck. Enjoy your birds.
 

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I have a male horseman pouter and I want to train him to come back to the coop once let out. Its his first year and he's my only bird but i'm getting him a female can you tell me how to train him i'm afraid to let him out because he might fly away and he does'nt trust me.Thanks!
if you have another pigeon on hand ..then its fine...horseman is sex-driven birds ..he will fly looking for another pigeon.. then you can show him the pigeon you have and he will come right to you
since he is a sex-driven bird ..is mind is set to mating ..so he wont be on the look out for hawk so much.. so dont let him stay out all day
 

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I don't know much about Horseman Pouters; I've seen pics, they look cool. But,I don't think they are homing birds....
'Free flying' is a very tricky thing...my birds free fly. 1st they should be a breed that 'homes' easily...(I think Horeseman is NOT one of those..pls read/ask the forum) Then there is the #Fact that you WILL lose birds when 'free flying'...hawks,lost birds etc. Since you are starting off with only 1 pigeon, I would think that 'free flying' is definitely out of the question for your Horseman.
Keep in mind, I've never had Horseman pigeons. Many responses to your questions might *seem* a little hostile, but I think everybody here just wants what's good for the bird(s)+you :) I'm happy to hear that you have established a more positive relationship with your Horseman. Getting him/her a mate might be the next step. Eggs,babies are a whole new chapter in raising pigeons;exciting and fun. Talk to other Horseman Pouter breeders, they would have good 1st hand information. Overall, I'ld suggest you to go slow and steady...get to know these wonderful birds..allow them to raise a family in a safe,secure enviroment. I wish good luck,Peace,
YaSin :)
 
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