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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hello,

I am a little new to the pigeon hobby. I currently have a 10x10 breeder loft and a 8x13 flying loft. The 8x13 is a recent addition and I built if from scratch so it's good to go, but my breeder loft was not originally designed to be a pigeon loft.

It has a concrete floor which is the source for my concern at this point. The concrete floor is dry 3 seasons out of the year, but when summer hits, with high humidity, the floor stays pretty moist. There is no standing water, but you can tell the concrete is different color, so there is moisture there.

At this point I can't change things, so I need to work with what I've got. Is there a floor covering that you guys could recommend that will help wick up the moisture and not cause harm to the birds.

I have searched through the old posts and saw some people use wood shavings/wood pellets, oil dry and stall dry. I'm leaning away from anything wood on the floor as it is known to harbor asper spores.

So, what exeperience to you guys have with using oil dry or stall dry? Or what other ideas are there to deal with moisture on a concrete floor?
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Thank you. That looks interesting, it seems like it's made of finely ground chalk. Anyone have any experience with this?
 

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I know a lot of people will disagree with me, but here goes:
I used bleach to disinfect my loft and put a fan on it to dry. The humidity was unbelievable! Anyway, once the floor was dried, I used wood chips to cover the concrete, about 3 inches. I then let the pigeon poop accumulate and rake it into the dry litter. I clean it out totally about every three months and add it to my compost pile.
I still scrape my perches and boxes a couple of times a week and spray a diluted bleach/water mixture on it. I have not had any problems with the birds being sick. The floor litter has to be kept dry, so if you have a leak or other moister problem, you have to fix that first. It works for me.
 

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I use Stall Dry with corn cob on top in my loft.
I put down a small layer of the Stall Dry and then put about 5 inches of corn cob on top of it.
Stall Dry is mainly used for horse stables but its safe around all animals.

http://www.drystall.com/dry_stall.html

I used to have a HUGE moisture problem but since I started using those I havent had any problems.
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
Thanks for the replies. I looked into that stall dry stuff, our feed and grain store around here only has the stuff that's made from lye.

I only have a moisture problem during rainy/humid weather, so I'm leaning towards the oil-dri/clay sort of remedy. I doubt it would be harmful if the birds ingested it.

Uncle Buck, I've heard similar methods to yours, if the shoe fits wear it, that isn't feasible for me, but thanks for your input.
 

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Do they carry Corn Cob?
You can use that alone and it will help with your moister problem.
It also helps keep the birds feet free of poop.
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
Do they carry Corn Cob?
You can use that alone and it will help with your moister problem.
It also helps keep the birds feet free of poop.
I don't know, I was already back from there when you replied.

I'll check. Thanks
 

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If you're still looking for an answer to your moisture problem you might try a couple inches of sand. I know people who use it on wooden floors, has to be the right type of sand. Droppings can be raked out and sand replaced a couple times a year.
 

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Products like chalk (Belgium White), oil dry, cat litter, ground corn cob, sawdust, etc, all tend to draw moisture. Since the floor is only 10' x 10', why not lay down a continuous edge to edge sheet of visqueen (plastic), then put down a layer of smooth plywood or luan over it. The plastic will make a vapor barrier, and the wood makes an easy to scrape floor. If it didn't work, it'd be simple to remove.
 

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My loft has a concrete floor
I used to have problems with dampness. it wasn't coming up from the ground
as there was a vapour barrier under the screed,
But was condensing from the atmosphere (the floor is very cold in winter)
so I laid 'cushion floor' for a bit of thermal insulation and that solved it!
Birdguy
 

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I use the Belgium white, and it works well to dry anything damp, but if the cement is constantly damp, I don't know. You might give it a try. I like it very much. If it doesn't work, I'd try Birdguys idea.
 
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