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Discussion Starter · #1 · (Edited)
I have a plain head hen and a cr cock, they have been through two rounds of hatching and the young are one pl head and one cr. my question is this is the creast sex linked? will the young bird with the creast be a certain sex?
 

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Interesting, I have a cock with crest and a plain head hen. First 3 rounds I got plain head chicks. Now I have started getting a "close to crests" The color pattern of these youngs are almost exact as the cock but they have little curvature of the feathers back in the head that they cannot be called crest, but not plain head, somewhere in between. Why would this be happening ? only the chicks with the same color and spread pattern as the cock is having this growth.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Interesting, I have a cock with crest and a plain head hen. First 3 rounds I got plain head chicks. Now I have started getting a "close to crests" The color pattern of these youngs are almost exact as the cock but they have little curvature of the feathers back in the head that they cannot be called crest, but not plain head, somewhere in between. Why would this be happening ? only the chicks with the same color and spread pattern as the cock is having this growth.

wow a blast from the past!!! lol..

the creasts I have are shell creast on a frillback. the curve forward encircling the head like this helmet http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/c/c6/Crested_helmet_pigeon.jpg

I have had two nest mates with creasts now, so my hen must carry a creast gene.
 

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A crested bird with a pure plain headed bird will give you all plain heads in F1. They'll be carrying the crest gene, so putting them with another crest will give you 50/50. With a plain headed mate, it'd be just like the initial pair.

Works the same way as most of the other recessive traits :)


But like in all things, you have poor quality and bad quality. Sreeshs, if you're starting to get slightly crested birds out of that same pair, then I'm assuming your hen is split for crest, and it's just been the luck of the draw that the majority so far have been plain headed.
I have a dove hen like you're describing, with just the slightest little peak on the back of her head. Sometimes it's easy to miss it. She is with a plain headed cockbird, and all the kids look like dad. However, one of her daughters, gave me the most beautiful crested dove. You cannot miss a crest like that!
If it was a matter of all birds with a certain trait looking the same and to perfection, then selecting show birds would be much easier :) So some things have to be improved on before they look as they should.
 

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So what you mean by that is the hen is also carrying one gene for crest inherited someway down the line. When from the cock and the hen the gene for crest is adopted I am getting a crested young one. But its still not having a crest like its father because the hen's crest gene is actually not of the same quality for crest as of the cock ? Is that the answer ? :) I am pretty new to genetics in pigeon and on the course of learning the A,B,C,D,..... :D
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
here is some creast info I got from someone.... it is handy ... not sure about the muffs.

Crested x crested would have 100% chance.

Crested X non-crested (non-carrier) would have 50% chance.

Crested X non-crested (carrier) would have 75% chance.

Non-crest (carrier) X non-crest (non-carrier) have 25% chance

Non-crest (carrier) X non-crest (carrier) have 50% chance.
 

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After doing some punnett squares and realizing I made a mistake in my last post (I'm not trying to do these in my head anymore, LOL), I'm confused.

I don't see how some of those things would work out.
Here's what I got:

Crested x crested would have 100% chance.

Crested X non-crested (non-carrier) would have 100% Plain-head and carrying crest gene.

Crested X non-crested (carrier) would have 50% Crest, 50% Plain-head carrying crest.

Non-crest (carrier) X non-crest (non-carrier) have 25% plain-head carrying crest, 75% pure plain-head.

Non-crest (carrier) X non-crest (carrier) have 25% crest, 50% plain-head carrying crest, 25% pure plain-head.

:confused:
 

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As for the muffs, I have no idea. I think this came up one time here, but I can't remember. I know there is grouse-leg, but I'm not sure if there's another feather-legged gene or not. If not, then it must come with a switcher gene that tells it when to stop growing, or we'd have the same length feathers on their feet all the time. Which I suppose could be why some crests are more developed than others....hmmm. Or maybe I'm just thinking too hard about the possibilities of genetics in pigeons :p
Since there's both peak crest and shell crest, does anyone know if there's two separate genes for them, or if there's just a general 'crested' gene?
 

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Discussion Starter · #13 ·
After doing some punnett squares and realizing I made a mistake in my last post (I'm not trying to do these in my head anymore, LOL), I'm confused.

I don't see how some of those things would work out.
Here's what I got:

Crested x crested would have 100% chance.

Crested X non-crested (non-carrier) would have 100% Plain-head and carrying crest gene.

Crested X non-crested (carrier) would have 50% Crest, 50% Plain-head carrying crest.

Non-crest (carrier) X non-crest (non-carrier) have 25% plain-head carrying crest, 75% pure plain-head.

Non-crest (carrier) X non-crest (carrier) have 25% crest, 50% plain-head carrying crest, 25% pure plain-head.

:confused:
lol... all I know is my pl head girl must carry crest as they hatched two (same clutch) crested babies. and one clutch had one crest and on plain. I would say if you want crests, breed crest to crest and you don't have to wait and see if you have a carrier...lol... Good stuff Becky:)
 

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Discussion Starter · #14 ·
As for the muffs, I have no idea. I think this came up one time here, but I can't remember. I know there is grouse-leg, but I'm not sure if there's another feather-legged gene or not. If not, then it must come with a switcher gene that tells it when to stop growing, or we'd have the same length feathers on their feet all the time. Which I suppose could be why some crests are more developed than others....hmmm. Or maybe I'm just thinking too hard about the possibilities of genetics in pigeons :p
Since there's both peak crest and shell crest, does anyone know if there's two separate genes for them, or if there's just a general 'crested' gene?
as far as the muffs go, just kinda interesting, my first frill babies had what I thought were poor muffs or not as long as they should be, a bit longer than grouse leg, and the last clutch both with crest mind you, had long muffs....from the same pair...what up with that?:p:)
 

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yah but i notice in my breeds too like i have what think ppl can a dun hen and a blue cock and they throw either one blue one dun or 2 duns but the blue is all ways a male
Could be luck. I guess it somewhat depends on what color you mean by dun. The REAL dun is dilute black, but many people call silvers (dilute blue) and browns 'dun' as well. But I'm assuming it isn't brown in your case because unless the cockbird was split for brown as well, they'd all be blue.
 

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Just checked for dilute as well. Still isn't sex-linked in the way that all blues are always male, in the pairing you have. So I suppose it is just your luck.
http://www.angelfire.com/ga3/pigeongenetics/diluteresults.html

Also, notice your cockbird must be split for dilute. IF this is silver we're talking about.
 

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As for the muffs, I have no idea. I think this came up one time here, but I can't remember. I know there is grouse-leg, but I'm not sure if there's another feather-legged gene or not. If not, then it must come with a switcher gene that tells it when to stop growing, or we'd have the same length feathers on their feet all the time. Which I suppose could be why some crests are more developed than others....hmmm. Or maybe I'm just thinking too hard about the possibilities of genetics in pigeons :p
Since there's both peak crest and shell crest, does anyone know if there's two separate genes for them, or if there's just a general 'crested' gene?
In Paul Gibson's book Genetics Of Pigeons he states the crest gene (cr) produces shell and peak crest - modifiers/polygenes determining whether peak or shell is produced.

Three types of feather footing are generally recognised - grouse, slipper and muffed.
 
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