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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Two of my birds have developed dark bumps on the base of their beaks and I'm quite concerned. I think these 2 might be feeding babies but I'm not 100% sure. I raised an abandoned baby whos now nearly ready to go with the others but I won't if its possible they're sick. Pics below
 

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"Ceres
Birds produce a white powder, which covers the eye and nose ceres. They fail to produce this when sick and so the ceres become dull. In addition, with respiratory infection, they become stained with discharge. Inflammatory material that forms in the sinuses drains underneath the nose cere and then through the slot in the roof of the mouth into the back of the throat. As this material flows under the nose cere, the cere acts like a sponge, absorbing this material, which stains it various shades of brown depending on the volume of material present. Not all ‘less than white’ ceres, however, indicate a problem. Rain can wash off the white powder covering the cere, exposing the red blood below to give the cere a pink hue. Also, young hens can lose this white powder through excessive billing."
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
"Ceres
Birds produce a white powder, which covers the eye and nose ceres. They fail to produce this when sick and so the ceres become dull. In addition, with respiratory infection, they become stained with discharge. Inflammatory material that forms in the sinuses drains underneath the nose cere and then through the slot in the roof of the mouth into the back of the throat. As this material flows under the nose cere, the cere acts like a sponge, absorbing this material, which stains it various shades of brown depending on the volume of material present. Not all ‘less than white’ ceres, however, indicate a problem. Rain can wash off the white powder covering the cere, exposing the red blood below to give the cere a pink hue. Also, young hens can lose this white powder through excessive billing."
I can't find anything online with ceres looking like this, what do you suggest I look for? Any symptoms I should also check for?
 

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If it is caused by fungal or yeast infection, it could be a relatively minor illness without any other notable symptoms. Adding naturally anti-fungal foods to the bird's diet might help. A bit of raw apple cider vinegar in the drinking water a couple of times a week is one, and a bit of lemon or lime juice in drinking water is another. Also seeds such as cumin, anise, rosemary, fennel, dill, and lentils. And chopped veggies like ginger, garlic, parsley, and thyme.

If it is strictly a behavioral cause, then perhaps those spots would fade and not reappear if the bird were moved to a different environment such as a temporary cage. If the spots stop occurring, then it is something done or encountered in the original environment.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Help!! Its gotten worse and spread around the eyelids and the rest of the adult birds! I'm gonna call the avian vet on monday. I can't find anything online like it. I'm attaching pictures
Finger Cotton Thumb Nail Cotton pad

Bird Head Eye Beak Iris

Bird Beak Feather Wood Falconiformes
 

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Respiratory infections usually do include both the eyes and the sinuses. Any nasal discharge? Or if you look inside the beak at the upper area toward the back there may be visible discharge.

More vitamin A may help (chopped small bits of carrot or bell/chili peppers is a great source and safe from overdose), along with naturally anti-biotic foods. Raw apple cider vinegar in drinking water a couple times per week. Also chamomile tea and honey with either lemon or lime juice in the water a couple of times per week (if it is too strong the bird might not drink it, which is the only related problem.) Cumin seed, dill seed, anise seed, rosemary seed, fennel seed, chopped ginger and garlic, and / or black pepper and cinnamon powder sprinkled on wet seeds (so that the powder will stick to the seeds) would all be good dietary additions for fighting respiratory illness such as fungal, yeast, or bacterial infection.

Or it could also be a strange case of pigeon pox (humans don't contract the disease), which is caused by a virus and there is no medical treatment for it, but once the bird is over the disease they don't get it again. There are naturally anti-viral foods which might help, and topical ointments that might help the pox sores when they appear.


 
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