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What color is the tail and the flights? An open wing picture would help a lot, but I know from experience how hard that can be to get. She looks a lot like a blue white tail or rump, even though her color does look a bit light. The 'diamonds' on the wings can be just spots or bars, like your hen has.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
I would have to agree, that is actually the best photo I have seen on the internet, I have been searching since Saturday even for pieds but that has to be the closest. Thanks MOE.
 

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I agree with Becky

There may be cinnamon or red involved with the reddish feathers but some young birds have these and moult it away. This bird looks to have very little pied but bred to another tends to increase the amount shown. I don't remember if the pied factor was a dominant or recessive gene. Been quite awhile since I had these little guys.

Bill
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 · (Edited)
Yeah I am still waiting to see what happens as far as breeding too, the male does not seem too interested in her and they still pretty much stay of different branches in their cage. When I release them then the male follows her and contact calls, but in the cage he could care less to what she is doing.
 

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Are you certain that you have a pair?

Yeah I am still waiting to see what happens as far as breeding too, the male does not seem too interested in her and they still pretty much stay of different branches in their cage. When I release them then the male follows her and contact calls, but in the cage he could care less to what she is doing.
Dallas looks sort of like a male but I've seen old hens with eye ceres that large too. Does he ever fan his tail and coo and bow?

You might consider putting a vitamin in their water or upping the protein content of their feed to see if you can stimulate some breeding behavior.

Diamond doves are also very sensitive to the amount of daylight that they have and are not likely to breed without a very regular schedule of daylight of more than 12 hours per day. I raised mine indoors under artificial lights on timers that provided 14 hours of daylight during breeding season. Artificial lights should be full spectrum or at least wide spectrum flourescent lights as this gives them vitamin D, like the sun. I also used a night light around my aviaries to provide dim lighting over night so that if they got spooked by anything, they would not flounder around in complete darkness. Lighting and a regular schedule is about as important as anything with many cage birds if you intend to breed them. Without it, you get nothing.

Bill
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
Yeah lighting is not an issue I have that down. And as far as calcium I have powdered up a cuttle bone and put a few pinches in their food every time i feed. As far as bow coo, I still have yet to see that happen. The breeder said that they where already paired off to different mates, but their mates didn't look in the best condition so I took a healthy male and a healthy female. I plan on giving them about a month and see what happens. Then I will get two more males if nothing happens. Luckily I know a few breeders.
 
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