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Spirit wings,

I think earlier on we established that its not a brown cuckoo dove (Brown cuckoo doves are huge rainforest birds, bigger than a feral pigeon).

Its very likely a baby feral spotted turtle dove, which looks like a laughing turtle dove at that age because of the absence of spots on the back of its neck.
 

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Spirit wings,

I think earlier on we established that its not a brown cuckoo dove (Brown cuckoo doves are huge rainforest birds, bigger than a feral pigeon).

Its very likely a baby feral spotted turtle dove, which looks like a laughing turtle dove at that age because of the absence of spots on the back of its neck.
That very may be what she has there..but without a picture ...........

she thought is was a brown cuckoo, that is all that is known about it or that she said she was pretty sure it was.. I think if it is , it would need to be released as it is a native wild species...but perhaps because it is so young it will be hard to tell untill it matures more.
 

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That's very true, about Native Australian doves needing to be raised by someone with the proper experience, and on the correct diet. Most can't survive on bird seed, since they eat fruit.

PS. The reason I don't think its a Brown Cuckoo dove is they are HUGE. They have long tails like a macaw, and they are about twice the size of a feral turtle dove. Also, I suspect it may have died on a diet of seed, as like most AUstralian Doves, the Cuckoo doves eat berries from specific native trees.
 

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Thank you for your reply.

Doves are not natives here. We have a group here called WIRES who care for all native animals and birds, but refuse to care for any non-natives, which is why it came home with me from the vet.

I think she came in at close to two weeks old....she was starting to fly, but not well. She was trying to run away from the cat outside, but could not fly form it (after I got the cat to drop it from her mouth). Within a couple days she'd started eating seed, within a week, she was refusing formula.

She seems to like me, but still usually flies away from me or walks away from me, so I think she's still quite feral.

I'd never let her fly outside if I decided to keep her and she'd either go in an aviary outside or have her own bedroom. I'm terrified if I let her back out the neighbor's cat will get her again, but hoping if I release her when other doves are around she'll join up with them and learn all about how to survive out there.

I'm torn! Very hard decision but I want to do what will make her happiest and be best for her.
I was just going off the OP.
 

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That very may be what she has there..but without a picture ...........

she thought is was a brown cuckoo, that is all that is known about it or that she said she was pretty sure it was.. I think if it is , it would need to be released as it is a native wild species...but perhaps because it is so young it will be hard to tell untill it matures more.
The rehab center refused the bird because they were certain it was not a native species. They just forgot to tell the OP what it was beyond "nonnative/invasive dove", so she was grasping for straws trying to describe the bird.


Also, I believe it is wrong to re-release non-native species--as invasive species tend to be damaging to the pre-existing ecosystem.
 

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I was just going off the OP.
According to Pizzey and Knight's, ``Field Guide to the birds of Australia'' (which I have in front of me right now) , in Australia, we have 12 species of native dove, and 3 species of feral dove. The spotted turtle dove is the only feral dove found in NSW, where the OP lives.
 

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According to Pizzey and Knight's, ``Field Guide to the birds of Australia'' (which I have in front of me right now) , in Australia, we have 12 species of native dove, and 3 species of feral dove. The spotted turtle dove is the only feral dove found in NSW, where the OP lives.
Then I would assume it to be a spotted turtle dove, since the OP said that the rehab center refused the bird on grounds of it being nonnative.
 

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she said it had a very long tail... which brown cuckoos have.. wish she would just post a picture..but if the pro said it was a non native then that is all she has to go on.. would of been nice of them to say which non native it was.
 

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Hi everyone, I'm new here, but have been reading here since recently rescuing a baby dove from the mouth of my neighbor's cat about 3-4 weeks ago. When I rescued her, I took her straight to the local bird vet, where she received a long lasting antibiotic, and since that time she's had a bedroom to herself in my house. She was quite young, just learning how to fly (which is probably why the cat got her) and I hand fed her for about 10 days. She's been eating seed on her own and drinking for about 2 weeks now, and it's time for me to make the decision about releasing her. I assumed I'd be releasing her, so I've been careful not to domesticate her, and since stopping the hand feeding, have limited my patting of her etc. Today there were lots of birds around outside and she was crying.....I've never seen her do that before, even when she was a baby wanting food. I'm not sure if she was trying to communicate with them, or something else was going on. For the first time in about a week, I picked her up and gave her a bit of stroking. I'm torn about releasing her....part of me thinks she'd be so much happier flying around with her friends and family....there have been doves around lately and I'm tempted to release her next time they are around so she can join them quickly. I'm also now aware of how much longer they can live in captivity. I have cats in the house, so it's not an ideal home for her. I of course have fallen in love with her, and if I kept her would try to get her a mate (ask the vet to let me take on the next dove etc that is unable to be released due to injury or something). I'm torn, but know I must make up my mind soon as she's flying very well on her own now, eating and drinking well etc. I'd so appreciate any advice. Thank you.
how did it go?! Did you set her free? Did you keep her?We saved a dove’s life during a freeze and I am so afraid I am not preparing him for life out there. Like you, I wouldn’t mind keeping him, but my first choice is that he have life out in nature. Any advice is super appreciated 🙏🏽🙏🏽🙏🏽
 

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This is a very old thread, you should actually start a new one. Was your dove a baby when rescued? Ideally he should be kept in an outside aviary for a couple of weeks before getting released After releasing, he will need a backup food supply as he won't know where to find food. If he is very tame and bonded to you, rather keep him.
 
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