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Discussion Starter #1
This is a girl that I have for like an year. The previous spring, she was like a month or less old when entered my window and I captured her, as I noticed she was breathing open mouthed. Later, at tests she appeared to have an incipient aspergillus, though the doctor said that the sample could been contaminated after it had been put into culture.


Later, she presented a scary icterus and at some times I tested her because of worrying aspect of droppings and found e.coli. E.coli is a problem at me because the rooms I keep the pigeons are contaminated. In last months, she never had normally looking droppings, always they were turning green or yellow, I guess because of e.coli. I treated her continuously with antibiotics (oral Baytril, sometimes injectable Lincospectin, lately oral amoxicillin) and that may have accumulated toxins in her already weak liver. Last days, her droppings turned yellow and then orange - reddish. I thought is because of e.coli and I gave again antibiotics. Now I realize that the color was because of serious liver damage.

I noticed her picking only bean seeds and some other bean or pea - related seed from mix (don't know what is). I found this behaviour and the other symptoms to be indicative of the fatty liver disease, about which I've read several articles online, like this one:
http://www.holisticbirds.com/pages/fld0502.htm


This kind of texts seem pretty well documented and complete, yet, I would like to learn if someone met this problem and had some experience, as I encounter these problems:


1. I tried to forcedly feed her with vegetables and greens as recommended on that webpage and I stressed her. I want to find some protein-rich food that she will like to eat.


2. I would like to know what kind of bean is the one that she picks as well as what kind of seed is the other one.




Here is how her droppings look lately:








Here is the bean she sellects and the other kind of seeds (the ones that are only as halves):













Here is she with her baby and a probably dead egg. Beyond is her husband:






She may not look in bad form but if you see how desperately she throws herself when she see a bean of that kind, you realize is something very wrong with her:
 

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Discussion Starter #3 (Edited)
Thank you. Does your book give any indication what can be done for such situation?


The photo with the chlamydia droppings is very useful as well. I have a pigeon displaying such kind of droppings and wondering what is. I will give later doxycycline (I already gave metro thinking it may be canker).


Also, can you give the title and author of the book? You may have mentioned on another thread but I didn't pay attention.
 

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Says too many variables and to get the droppings tested.

The book is called "The pigeon" by Dr. Colin Walker, newest book out and sold at Seigals Pigeon supply.

It lists a host of diseases that can cause that poop color and u cant possibly treat for EVERY thing, would blow the liver before u cure the bird. So check the book out and see what you think, its 120 u.s. bucks plus shipping.
 

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Discussion Starter #5
The aspect of droppings ameliorated. I noticed similar droppings color at two other hens to whom I gave probably excessive amounts of calcium + D3, this may have caused the toxicity.
 

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Discussion Starter #7
Possibily, the red color was caused, at least in some instances, by her eating redstone (I surprised her doing this). Nevertheless, the decoloration and yellow shade of the droppings, and possibly the red color as well, were caused by some intoxication. I noticed it ocurred only after medicating her which means was produced either by medicine (amoxicillin) either by the excessive amount of vitamins which I was giving each time I was medicating.
 
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