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This may be a problem that others experience too.

I have always heard that When birds have young in the nest, it is good to have food available to them at all times, so they can feed the young when they want it. So i have a small feeding cup in each nest box.

I start in the morning by filling the feeder, and when i check back in the afternoon they have picked through the feed and eaten what they want (always the safflower first) and scattered what they don't want.

So do i refill the feeder in the afternoon, or do i let them get hungry until they finally decide to eat the other grains? And won't the babies suffer if i don't refill the feeder?

How do the big lofts get through the breeding season without wasting a ton of feed? What's the secret, here? :confused:

Thanks for any advice, i can't be the only one who has experienced this...
 

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I've had that problem with individual breeding compartments but in an open loft they wont act that way if you feed them all in a big feeder, they will eat it all because they know if they don't the next guy will.
 

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What about making something like this. They can't throw the seed as much with these type feeders.


 

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Purina Green for breeders and Purina Gold for racers, I feed in hoppers and they use to pick and choose, I would have wasted feed every where with the pellets No problem, and the get everything the need Love it
 

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Even if they can't scatter the food, they'll leave behind what they don't want - if they're not hungry.

I agree that pellets would solve the problem. With pellets they simply don't have any choices. But some people don't like a diet exclusively of pellets for various reasons. You'll have to figure that out for yourself.

I also use feed cups in the breeding boxes. But I simply ration the food and feed twice a day. I have a little scoop that helps me measure the feed. In my case, if there are only the parents in the box, I give them one scoop in the morning. When I come back in the evening to feed and there is any left, I give them a little less than a scoop. If in the morning there is any left, I give them a little less again until I know what their appetite is. Of course, their appetite changes for various reasons (cold), so if they start getting panicky and crazy when it's time to feed, I take it back up to a full scoop. (By the way, I like feeding in the boxes - it helps them associate my hands with food)

As babies start to hatch and grow, I use the same method, but just incrementally add feed. For example, if babies have just hatched, I give and extra 1/4 scoop each time. A few days later, I give an extra 1/2 scoop. Eventually, they get 2-3 scoops each feeding depending on the size of the babies. But each time I feed, the cups are empty. I can see that the babies have food in their crops so they aren't hurting for food. I feed at about 8 am and then at 5 or 6 pm so the longest they go without food is over night.
 

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Pellets the best & they have everything in them for breeders. & young & everyone gets the same feed . As far as some breeders don't like them then don't eat um they are for the pigeons . Lol
 

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I've had the occasional bird that had a bad reaction to pellet. Couldn't digest them. Their crop filled up with undigested soupy mess and got all giant and saggy. Some birds have an inability to digest the binder in the pellet. Switching to grain cleared it up.

The other problem comes if you send birds out to other people who feed grain. Coming out of the shipping box, you want them to not hesitate to eat.
 

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As I said breeders these are birds in breeding pen raising babies there on pellets free feed 24/7 . Once out of breeding pen & also youngsters when weaned all go on measured amount of grain so no waste . My birds end up knowing pellets & grain so no issues. Sorry to hear you've had digestive problems Kastle loft I like the pellets 24/7 gravity feed for my pouters which are prone to sour crop as you prescribe & have had no problems since switch over (long time) . Not everthing works for everyone but unless you give it a try if you have an issue you never know .. In the fancy
 

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24/7

Been feeding pellets for over 40 years , they are excellent for both young and breeders. My major concern during breeding season is to raise quality young and keep my breeders in excellent condition . By giving grain and pellets (22%
protein) both young and breeders are in great condition.
I never ration feed during breeding season - 24/7 in breeding loft.
Keep grain and pellets in separate feeders and let birds decide when they want to eat , feed young , rest , etc. TRY TO KEEP IT STRESS FREE FOR BIRDS.
Yes , their might be a little waste of feed , however , the results are worth it.
Never had pellets good bad - a great deal of time it is not the feed but how it is stored and for how long.
Do not like plastic or metal containers for storing feed - they may sweat if exposed to frequent temp. changes.
All I know is you raise beautiful young on grain and pellets and my breeders are in excellent condition after breeding season.
 

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Do not like plastic or metal containers for storing feed - they may sweat if exposed to frequent temp. changes.
Hi Bob,

Well temp changes we sure have out here! So, if not using metal or plastic for feed keep/storage what do you keep yours in? I'm buying #50 sacks of food, storing in (several) food certified plastic buckets with rubber sealing rings in the lids for air tightness.

Thanks for your thoughts.
 

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Wood Chest - Cedar

I use wood chest - keep feed in my garage - temp. stays pretty constant.
I don't like idea of keeping feed outside - where temp.and conditions can vary .
I have about 150 LB. feed (grain) 100lb. pellets and about 50-100 lb. of peanuts on hand most of time. Peanuts will vary depending time of year.
I don't keep a lot of feed on hand , because feed store is near.
Had a very close friend and excellent pigeon man that was in Army pigeon corp. He talk about a lot of problems they had keeping birds healthy, he was vet assist. Dampness was a big problem and storing feed another.
He taught me a great deal and was a "TRUE FANCIER"and " GREAT FRIEND "!
 
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