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Hello everyone,

I have been posting a lot here, but i was wondering when you guys feed your racers. I just got new ones, and i was wondering when you guys train and feed them? would it be better to do it at night, or in the morning?:confused::p
 

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How old are they?

I would feed in morning AFTER training and in the afternoon.

If they are very young and not flying outside yet, give them extra.
 

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How old are they?

I would feed in morning AFTER training and in the afternoon.

If they are very young and not flying outside yet, give them extra.
They are about 2 1/2 months old. yesterday was there first time out. Got them from the breeder ant about 2 Months. so they should be excecising in the afternoon? and how much does each bird get? i heard a tablespoon? is this true?
 

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They are about 2 1/2 months old. yesterday was there first time out. Got them from the breeder ant about 2 Months. so they should be excecising in the afternoon? and how much does each bird get? i heard a tablespoon? is this true?
Wouldn't a table spoon of feed too little for pigeons meant for racing ?
 

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I feed 1 oz per bird =2tbsp so if you have 8 pigeons I would feed 1 cup .....
That's 1 oz by weight????? not volume?? Right???? I feed at different times during the day when training to ensure they always come to the dinner bell. Helps my training.

Tony
 

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Hello everyone,

I have been posting a lot here, but i was wondering when you guys feed your racers. I just got new ones, and i was wondering when you guys train and feed them? would it be better to do it at night, or in the morning?:confused::p
I weigh the feed every feeding am and pm. I try to feed the same time 6:30 am, 6:30 pm. I let/run all the birds out of the loft before every feeding. I record the time they fly, how fast they trap, and the weight of feed that feeding.

Last night I fed them 26 oz (by weight) .48 oz per bird. They flew 13 minutes and all 54 birds trapped in under a minute.

This morning I fed them 27 oz that is 1/2 ounce per bird. They flew 19 minutes, and with the exception of two birds trapped under a minute.

What I want to get is around 1 ½ oz per birds per day (.75 per feeding) and flying two hours a day. Loft flying or training them up the road twice a day just before feeding.

I cut the feed back for a few days to get all the birds to trap quickly. Every feeding I will increase the feed by an oz until I get to around 40 oz. If the birds are slow to trap I will drop the feed a little the next meal.

When I say slow to trap I mean the time from when the first bird traps to the last. Ideally this is under a minute. The birds are conditioned by the feed, if they don’t trap quickly they don’t eat that meal.

I am not saying this is wrong or right it is just what I am doing. As far as your situation, the birds will adjust to your schedule. I think the more important questions is do you have more time in the night or morning. I have fed once a day but prefer twice a day.
 

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In one of my 4x4 lofts last year I kept anywhere from 3-6 birds. I gave them about a 1/2 cup of feed, regardless of the number of birds, in the morning before going to work. When I got home around 5PM I let them out to fly. The feed cup would be empty, with the undesireable seeds on the floor or left in cup. My birds would fly until the sun went down, or starting to go down, anywhere from 2 to 3 1/2 hrs during the summer. I've never had to use food as a "bribe" for the birds to trap on a training toss (up to 250 miles). I didn't race these birds, but have trained them hard almost weekly at times. When they got home, they went straight into the loft.

Having kept several small groups of birds like this and experimenting, I saw that they didn't need to eat a lot to fly hard. Some didn't eat much at all, as a matter of fact. In a loft full of birds, you don't know who eats more or less, and assume they all eat equal amounts. But, in smaller numbers you can see more.
 
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I will agree feeding is an art form but I prefer to feed my birds twice a day and sometimes they do seem to be alot hungrier then others so its all about what you expect your birds to do on a daily basis ;)
 

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I agree with LokotaLoft. Do keep in mind that birds that are feeding babies, should have food available all the time. So should birds that are newly weaned that may be timid and bullied by other birds. because they might not be getting enough.
 
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its very true as chris said babies need alot more for development then older birds that arent feeding youngins;)
 

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Al said this far is ferry true. When I was still flying I use to feed the racing team with my hand. Dropping half of their portion into the feeding try and hand feed the rest. When the second pigeon go for the water I will stop with the feed. If you race them hard they need more food to sustain their form. But some pigeons will eat less and others more. I had great success with this method
 

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Excellent points, Charis! When you restrict feed, you need to monitor individual birds very closely so a bird which is a bit under the weather doesn't end up doing downhill.
 
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