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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Okay this is my first post and I have had a pigeon since 2007 ive just turned 17 now and the pigeon seems to be in good shape. My dad saved the pigeon from being killed by superstitious garage owners hes been living in the family home since. I believe he is a male since he preforms the mating dance and can be aggressive.

I have attached to pictures from 2008.

I am from London and white pigeons are rare.

Anyway to the point My uncle caught what seems to be a female fantail(Im not 100% sure its female he insists it is) Its smaller, timid and its head is flatter. The problem is when introduced to each other and I only got the female a few hours ago. My male pigeon does the courtship dance and receives no response from the female. In addition he pecks her neck violently after she ignores him, she rarely fights back and still seems to ignore him. I separated the pigeons at the moment and they are proximate to each other and can see each other. Is this normal and does this hint to any problems. Should I allow the violent behavior or should it be of concern. I'm really unsure.
Thanks :)
 

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Keeping them separated is best thing for now.

Apart from anything else, introducing a new pigeon should be done after it has been in 'quarantine' for at least a couple of weeks, in case it has any health issues not yet obvious and which could affect your male.

Maybe they could be better introduced in adjacent, but not too close, cages?

'Her' lack of interest may be causing the male to think 'she' is also male, and therefore to be confronted.
 

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Some males are very aggressive. As was mentioned, any new bird should be quarantined for a month to make sure that they are healthy. To introduce them, you would set up 2 cages for several days, where they can see each other. After a while you can put the cages closer together, but where they can't touch each other. Eventually, if she shows interest in him, by going to that side of the cage, or acting like she may like him, then you can let them out somewhere neutral where she can get away from him if she wants to. Don't put her into his cage, as that is his territory. He could really injure her. Give them time and see what happens. Don't allow him to be over aggressive with her. Take your time.
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
Thanks, they are separated for now, silly me I do biology at high school and forgot about disease anyway thanks.
 

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After the quarantine period and the cage adjacent to cage period and some getting-to-know-you "dates" in a bathroom or other unclaimed territory, once you think they might get along, you might try putting him in her cage for a while (thus he is in her territory so there's nothing for him to protect.) Let them "honeymoon" there for a while until you are sure that they'll get along. Then they can live in his cage (if it's bigger.)

I don't know how well this will work for pigeons, but it worked with my super aggressive ringneck dove cock.
 

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I did the same thing last year, introduced a hen to my pet pigeon and it turned out fine. It took about 2 months for him to accept her presence (meaning he stopped chasing her) and then another couple of weeks for them to mate.

I have never left them alone at the time and they were roaming free in the apartment. I think you need to have patience as nature and instincts ussually prevail.

Be aware that after they mate, they will need a nesting place, and you will have to replace the eggs with plastic ones (unless you want more pigeons).

There is still a possibility that the second pigeon is also a male, maybe more experienced people on this forum can give you hints on this.
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
Thanks guys,
I would like to point out the bird are in separate cages and they copy each other by sitting and napping when their counterpart does.

Ill try and get a picture of what the 'female', so it can be verified I need to get a good shot so I need to wait for a bit since both birds are napping.
 

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Thanks guys,
I would like to point out the bird are in separate cages and they copy each other by sitting and napping when their counterpart does.

Ill try and get a picture of what the 'female', so it can be verified I need to get a good shot so I need to wait for a bit since both birds are napping.
You can't always tell by a photo if a bird is a hen or a cock. The only 100% test is DNA or the bird laying an egg. You can guess pretty well by behavior.

So far what your bird is doing sounds like how my dove Edmund first reacted to (for sure a hen) Lita. Now they've raised a clutch of babies and are working on laying a new clutch (already replaced the first egg.)
 
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