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Discussion Starter #1
This is my first time with pigeons. I have six young homing pigeons, all born this past winter. About 2 1/2 weeks ago, one bird laid the first two eggs. I have only seen the mother on the eggs these last few weeks, so I don't know which bird is the father. The past few times I have checked, no bird has been on the eggs. The temperature has been around 100 F. Is it common for the eggs to not have a bird on them? Is it maybe because the temperature is so hot the eggs do not need a bird on them? Could it be the male is too young to know it is his duty to sit on the eggs when the mother needs a break?

I guess my real question is whether I should be concerned, or if it is normal for the birds to be off the eggs sometimes?
 

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Can you post a picture of your set up, and exactly how old your birds are and did you candle the eggs and how long since the eggs were laid?

It is possible they may be immature if they are 6 months or under 6 months of age, and they don't quite know their duty, but they will leave the eggs if the eggs are not fertile, or something is wrong with them and they aren't going to hatch.
 

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The hen may just be getting some nesting instincts, the eggs may be infertile and there actually may not be a dad at all. They're just going through their puberty stage.
 

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This is my first time with pigeons. I have six young homing pigeons, all born this past winter. About 2 1/2 weeks ago, one bird laid the first two eggs. I have only seen the mother on the eggs these last few weeks, so I don't know which bird is the father. The past few times I have checked, no bird has been on the eggs. The temperature has been around 100 F. Is it common for the eggs to not have a bird on them? Is it maybe because the temperature is so hot the eggs do not need a bird on them? Could it be the male is too young to know it is his duty to sit on the eggs when the mother needs a break?

I guess my real question is whether I should be concerned, or if it is normal for the birds to be off the eggs sometimes?
usually they do go into laying eggs because they have a mate..it stimulates them to do this. the cock USUALLY sits them midday so you may be missing it. if these are first time nesters the cock may not be doing his job because of inexperience. I wait till they are about a year old before letting them hatch eggs esp if they sat fake ones well then usually they will be good parent birds too. you know what they say about teenagers having babies.. sometimes they do not make the best parents, same with pigeons.. somtimes.
 

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Discussion Starter #5 (Edited)
Here is a photo of the nest. http://www.flickr.com/photos/[email protected]/7612656824/in/photostream [URL="
[/URL]

And the eggs: http://www.flickr.com/photos/[email protected]/7612657350/in/photostream

I also had the surprise of new eggs today with a different bird, different perch: http://www.flickr.com/photos/[email protected]/7612657102/in/photostream

I don't really know how old they are as I didn't know to ask when I bought them. I have owned them since April 1, 2012. April 15th was their first time to fly.
 

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You need to give them some nesting material to build a nest with.
 

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Well they need something. Without nesting material, the babies are more likely to get splayed leg. They like putting a nest together. I think it's important to them. Some build great nests, and others not so great. I tried regular short pine needles and my birds don't bother with them, but they love the long ones. And they like stiff clean straw. Some people buy the tobacco stems from pigeon supply places. Mine mostly like the long pine needles and straw. Just put it out where they can find it, and then watch them collect it and take it back to their nest. It's fun to watch.

 

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Discussion Starter #9
I looked at the first eggs and they are infertile. Amazing how the birds know the eggs are duds. With those instincts, why will they sit on dummy eggs?

I have put some nesting material in there for them.

I guess it is best to use dummy eggs until the birds get older. Is that because the young birds might not take care of the babies, and the babies might not survive?
 

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I don't think they know if they are infertile. If they don't sit on the eggs as they should, then they probably wouldn't make very good parents either. Sometimes best to wait til they are a bit older.
 

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I looked at the first eggs and they are infertile. Amazing how the birds know the eggs are duds. With those instincts, why will they sit on dummy eggs?
I think some birds know when the eggs underneath them are not fertile, usually the experienced hens. There has to be a unique sensation coming from a viable and growing embryo. I'm sure the birds can sense it.

Also, I have hens that will sit on real eggs and refuse the dummies everytime I replace them, some know the eggs are plastic or wood everytime.

 

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I only have one hen who can tell the difference between real eggs and wooden ones. But most don't.
 

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I looked at the first eggs and they are infertile. Amazing how the birds know the eggs are duds. With those instincts, why will they sit on dummy eggs?

I have put some nesting material in there for them.

I guess it is best to use dummy eggs until the birds get older. Is that because the young birds might not take care of the babies, and the babies might not survive?
I don't know how they know, my thinking is most take dummy eggs when given early as there is no movement in the real eggs untill later.. mine tend to give up on dummy eggs sooner than their real unfertile eggs..so if the eggs are not fertile then just leave them till they give up. some boil the real eggs if not wanting embryos to grow and put them back when cool if they do not have dummy eggs to give. I think some pairs or hens refuse dummy eggs perhaps because they have been given over and over and they learn these type eggs don't hatch and remember it, most young pairs have not learned that yet.
 

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it is a good reminder to count the days AFTER the second egg is layed and sat on.. they do not start to develope untill they sit on their egg/s. so 18 to 19 days AFTER the pair start incubating the SECOND egg. :)
 

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it is a good reminder to count the days AFTER the second egg is layed and sat on.. they do not start to develope untill they sit on their egg/s. so 18 to 19 days AFTER the pair start incubating the SECOND egg. :)

You're right. I should have explained it that way.
 
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