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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I have a baby pigeon from a pair that nested about 5 and a half feet off the ground. Baby is about 6 weeks old but he was seriously injured at 8 days and I think it has stunted his growth a bit. He fell out of/jumped out of the nest at some point between 8pm the day before yesterday, and 2pm yesterday.

he wasn’t walking very much before this, but he could stand and take a few steps. Now he isn’t walking at all. I don’t know if it’s because he’s sore from walking around on the ground of if he’s injured. I seriously doubt anything is broken. I checked to make sure nothing was dislocated.

the only way he can move around is by pushing himself along with his wings, but his wings are still super weak so he just stays in one spot.

Baby was eating on his own a bit but now he shows little interest in food, so I’ve been force feeding him. He is drinking water on his own.

I’m really hoping that he’s just tired and will be alright by tomorrow. Here is some pictures:
Bird Beak Feather Grass Wood

Plant Flower Purple Textile Sleeve

Bird Beak Ducks, geese and swans Swan Seabird

Bird Beak Feather Wing Claw

Hand Gesture Finger Feather Nail

Bird Beak Feather Wing Parrot
His legs looked pretty red so I included a pic because I don’t know if it’s normal. I included a picture of his poop.
 

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Any sign of white streaks or spots, or yellow growths inside the bird's beak and throat? The dropping looks a bit purple but that may be due to lighting, or to foods. Is it a normal color for your birds? Any sign of leg joints being swollen?

Leg paralysis causes: Dietary deficiency of calcium and vitamin D. Salmonella or paramyxovirus infection.

I'd give him lemon juice in water, a teaspoon to a cup of water to drink, for electrolytes. Then vitamin D such as from hard-boiled chicken's egg yolk. If possible, place the bird where he can get direct sunlight too. Then calcium from crushed eggshell, or from bits of hard cheddar or parmesan cheese. Raw unshelled sunflower seeds, chickpeas, roasted but unsalted peanuts, safflower seeds, oats, sesame seeds, chia seeds, pigeon peas, mung beans, and flax seeds are comparatively good grain/seed/legume sources of calcium as well.

He should start to perk-up within a few hours after the lemon juice, vitamin D, and calcium.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
I force fed him 26 peas just now and a pea sized piece of a tums tablet. I hope I didn’t overdo it with the calcium but I looked it up and it looks like it would only be harmful if I kept giving to him like that. His droppings are now a dark green, which I expected. I’m really hoping he doesn’t have any internal problems from the fall.
 

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I hadn't heard about using Tums, but it appears that it is mainly calcium carbonate which is limestone and is one of the main sources of environmental calcium for wild birds.

The only problem is the potential lack of vitamin D which is necessary for the bird to properly absorb any form of calcium. If he gets plenty of direct sunlight, his body can create D from his preen oil which he spreads on his feathers, then under direct sunlight part of that oil is converted to vitamin D, which he then also spreads onto his skin as he preens again.

There aren't any great plant-based sources of vitamin D. Certain types of mushrooms do produce some vitamin D, but given that pigeons tend to hate mold and fungus, I haven't even tried to get one to eat any mushrooms. Also a bit leery of setting a precedent for the bird. Egg yolks or meat (mostly fish or liver) is about all that are left as good natural sources of vitamin D, other than direct sunlight.
 

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I haven't encountered a situation where a young bird's parents haven't taken good care of the bird. I've only had to hand-feed one young pigeon, the youngest that I've known so far at about two weeks of age. He was separated from his parents by an unfortunate series of events created by thoughtless people who didn't stop to consider the effects of their actions on the local wildlife. Even with that bird, it wasn't so much force-feeding as just holding food (a gloopy mix of ground seeds, spices, lemon juice, and water) up to his beak and he gobbled it all as fast as he could. His parents had taken good care of him and he was strong, alert, and hungry from several days without food. I gave him sunflower seeds separate from the mix and held a palm-full of those up to his beak too. He tried to eat the seeds although only a few actually ended-up in his beak at first. He very quickly transitioned to an all seed diet, grew well, and was released.

From reading accounts such as yours with Pistachio, I think that cases where the parents aren't taking good care of the squabs are far more challenging and require a much higher-level of care for the young. Perhaps such situations could be reduced or improved by doing something differently with the parents prior to the arrival of their young. Something nutritional, or availability to freely fly or some enjoyable form of exercise, or access to a potted chamomile plant to calm down any irritated males. I don't know exactly what would help, but I'd say that it must be something different in how domesticated birds live vs. wild birds.
 
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