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Discussion Starter · #1 · (Edited)
I have had my young homers for eleven days now and I want them to loft fly. I want to know, is it to early? They know the whistle for feeding now and they come running when i blow the whistle! Should I wait till spring or would it be ok to try them? I love em and don't want to lose them. I want to do all the right things. They come from good stock. (Thanks Dave).


Dave, is who I got them from!
 

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Hi Dave,

How old are they?

At this stage you need to start trap training them,if you haven't, using a wire cage to contain them on the outside of the loft. They need to come in from the cage thru the trap at the sound of the whistle, once they get good at that they are ready for loft flying. This also gives them a chance to get familiar with the surroundings outside without actually letting them out.

Give them a couple more weeks.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Tressa,
They were born last month. Oh, my name is Russ not Dave..lol
 

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trap training is next, you can let them out at about 7 or 8 weeks old. on a calm day with nothing to scare or freak them out, in the evening I think is good about an hour before you feed them, call them in for feeding , they may want to stay out, so leave the trap open, they should go in that evening or the next day, call then feed, if they do not trap they do not eat, wait to feed, stick to the the regular feeding schedule. and do not over feed.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
HELP: Wanna fly my young homers?

Do I just open the door and let them fly? I want to try them today! Its nice out!
 

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Start training them to trap---you do not want to wait until they are too strong on the to let them out.--They may fly off too far.
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
I am confussed with it all. I had homers 25 years ago and had no problems, guess I forgot it all? I need all the details, from beginning to end.
I thank you all for helping.
 

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Have ANY of you gone back and seen the history on these birds? WHEN he got them? Far as I can tell, he just got them in his loft on 20 Sept. That was 11 SHORT days ago. Too soon to let them out IMO.
Rackerman.........have you trained them to go through the bobs when you call them? If so, how have they done? If not, then NO, don't let them out.
IMO, they need a minimum of 2 weeks in YOUR loft, going through YOUR routine with them EVERY SINGLE DAY.
IMO, (I have lots of them....:rolleyes:), when letting your birds out for the first time, you need to plan ahead. Don't just willy nilly decide to throw them out one day.
I always plan a couple day ahead, cut back on the feed a little and do every thing I can to give the birds the advantage.
Birds sitting in a settling cage/aviary and coming when called is TOTALLY different than them being on the outside in the REAL world. Sitting in the aviary, they've got absolutely no where TO GO but inside when you call. Once they hit the roof of the loft or a tree or the top of your house, it becomes a different deal all together unless they've been trained VERY well and the feed has been monitored closely and I would venture to say that at least 90% of fanciers can not or are not THAT hard on their birds. Myself included. When I let my birds out the first time,, it's a test of wills between me and the birds. That's totally MY fault, but it is what it is. ;)
 

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Thanks Lovebird, sounds like I need more time.
Time is correct. If you do not have any way to trap train then catch each bird, carry it around the loft, hold it at the trap a few seconds, then drop it into the trap. Do this with each bird for seven days. If you have a way to put them outside the trap without them being free, then trap train. Put them all outside the trap wait five to ten minutes then call them to feed. Do this until they all come when you call. Then let them out. But let them out hungry and late in the afternoon.

Tony
 

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The way I trained mine, I would put the them in open cage infront of the trap, so they got no other choice but to use the trap. Let them sit there in the morning before feeding and by noon they figured it out. I did the same thing next day and repeated the process literally all day. Day 3 they were all well trained.
 

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I do not see the point in leaving them out there for hours, I either catch mine already out there or I put them out there before the pm feeding, never took over 20 mins for them to drop in..but I have a simple drop trap so that may be why....my newest ybs, dropped in, in about 5 mins the first time they were out in the settling cage..those two have been the quickest so far, smart birds. they came from Big T.
 

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I thought your first loft flights were supposed to be 1/2 hour to an hour before dark and not to feed the birds before letting them fly so they come back due to it getting dark and being hungry? or in the morning without thier morning feed then call them in after 1/2 hour or so with whatever your using to train them when you feed them- whistle, rattling coffee can of feed, etc. Does that sound like the gist of it?? Thanks for explaining the traps and trap training. I'ma learnin.
 

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I thought your first loft flights were supposed to be 1/2 hour to an hour before dark and not to feed the birds before letting them fly so they come back due to it getting dark and being hungry? or in the morning without thier morning feed then call them in after 1/2 hour or so with whatever your using to train them when you feed them- whistle, rattling coffee can of feed, etc. Does that sound like the gist of it?? Thanks for explaining the traps and trap training. I'ma learnin.
that is the gist...
 

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Thanks folks. Spiritwings, since you asked: (well yes, I know you didn't actually ask.)
GIST-" The odd thing about "gist," given that it means "the essence, the central truth of something," is that the word "gist" itself began life as a slight mistake. Back in the 17th century, a phrase commonly used in Anglo-French legal jargon was "cest action gist," which meant "this action lies" (the Old French "gist" being a form of the verb "gesir," to rest or lie). "Cest action gist" was used to assert the central point of a case or argument ("This action lies in the defendant's treason," for example) and, being a useful term, was adopted into English legal use in the early 18th century. Unfortunately, there was a bit of a misunderstanding of French going on, and "gist," which literally meant "lies or rests," was imported as if it were a noun meaning "the central point," and by 1711 English lawyers were speaking of "the very gist of the action." " yep- gist.
anyway thanks for the info actually pertaining to pigeons. Since I actually have little stored up knowledge pertaining to pigeons I'll leave you with the origins of "gist". Keystonepaul
 
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Thanks folks. Spiritwings, since you asked: (well yes, I know you didn't actually ask.)
GIST-" The odd thing about "gist," given that it means "the essence, the central truth of something," is that the word "gist" itself began life as a slight mistake. Back in the 17th century, a phrase commonly used in Anglo-French legal jargon was "cest action gist," which meant "this action lies" (the Old French "gist" being a form of the verb "gesir," to rest or lie). "Cest action gist" was used to assert the central point of a case or argument ("This action lies in the defendant's treason," for example) and, being a useful term, was adopted into English legal use in the early 18th century. Unfortunately, there was a bit of a misunderstanding of French going on, and "gist," which literally meant "lies or rests," was imported as if it were a noun meaning "the central point," and by 1711 English lawyers were speaking of "the very gist of the action." " yep- gist.
anyway thanks for the info actually pertaining to pigeons. Since I actually have little stored up knowledge pertaining to pigeons I'll leave you with the origins of "gist". Keystonepaul
keystonepaul the first experiance with releasing your birds is everything when it comes to your birds, after that everything seems that much easier ;)
 
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