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I have found a baby crested pideon i need to no what to feed it ive been giving it wheatbix can some one please help me
 

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Baby crested pigeon

Thank you for helping this baby. I moved your post to its own thread. Are you in Australia? Is the baby fully feathered and does it still have fluff on its head? If you could post a picture that would be helpful.

If you haven't done so already, please read "Basic Steps to Saving the Life of a Pigeon or Dove" below:

It is vital to stabilize an ill or injured pigeon or dove as soon as possible after rescue.
Three basic steps should be followed.
HEAT, ISOLATION & HYDRATION

HEAT:
A bird must be warmed gradually to a normal body temperature and be responsive (able to swallow). It is not unusual for a baby bird presented for rehabilitation to be very cold. (If a bird is unresponsive, please seek the assistance of an experienced rehabber or avian vet immediately.)

Give the bird a quick, superficial examination. Unless there is a critical situation, e.g., (severe bleeding) all birds should be covered and placed on a heat source* (see below) for at least 20-30 minutes to bring the body temperature back to normal.

If head trauma is suspected, do not place the bird on heat.

ISOLATION:
Allow the bird to stabilize in a quite, dark, warm area.
While the bird is warming, take the opportunity to prepare any other items you may need to care for the bird, e.g., International Rehydrating Solution (recipe noted below)

A 'COLD' BIRD SHOULD NEVER BE GIVEN FLUID OR FOOD, PERIOD!!

HYDRATION:
Fluids should be given after, and ONLY AFTER, the bird has been warmed, examined for any injuries & a determination is made as to the severity of his dehydration.
All fluids should be warmed or at room temperature!

Description and degrees, of hydrated and dehydrated birds
A well hydrated bird will be very alert, have elastic skin, bright eyes, moist, plump membrane inside the mouth and well formed moist droppings.

A moderately dehydrated bird will be less than fully alert, have dry, flaky skin, dull eyes, non-formed droppings and have a sticky membrane in the mouth.

A severely dehydrated bird will be lethargic or unconscious, the skin will 'tent' when slightly pinched, have sunken eyes, dry or absent droppings and have dry membrane in the mouth.

Depending on the cause and degree of dehydration, reversing this condition can take up to 24 hours. If the bird is alert, he may be rehydrated by mouth, using an eye dropper and putting drops along his beak every few minutes, making sure the fluids are room temperature or warmed slightly. Initially, a rehydrating solution should be administered. Plain water should not be given unless nothing else is available.

If the bird is not swallowing on his own or fully alert, he must be given fluids under the skin (sub-Q method).
WARNING!! This procedure should only be performed by an experienced rehabber or vet.

Please follow these simple, basic, yet most important steps.
The cells of the body simply don't work properly when dehydrated. Absolutely no digestive processes can take place if the gut CAN'T work. Absorption will not take place, food sits in the gut, undigested, and will eventually kill the bird.

* Heat source suggestions:
Towel lined heating pad, set on low
Towel lined hot water bottle
Low wattage lamp, directing the light into the cage.

* Emergency heat source substitute:
Fill an old sock about 2/3 full of rice. Microwave the sock for a few seconds. Making sure it isn't too hot, place it around the bird.

* International Rehydrating Solution:
To a cup of warm water add a pinch of salt & sugar, mix well. Use this solution to rehydrate by mouth.

* Emergency rehydrating substitute:
Pedialyte, unflavored.

By following these basic steps you have done your best to stabilize your little feathered patient until further assistance is available.

Please let us know approximately where you are located so we can hopefully find a fancier or rehabber to help you. Wheatabix is okay for now but baby bird formula would be better. Can you buy hand-feeding formula for baby parrots in your area?

-Cathy
 

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Wonderful information BirdsforMom4ever posted--a long reading list but very very informative on a lot of different angles----How old is the baby pigeon you found?? c.hert
 

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Just to add...The rice filled heated sock and hot water bottle, should only be used short term, the reason being, the baby needs continuous heat source rather than one that cools down. The heating pad, that doesn't have an automatic shut off, is prefered.
 

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Wonderful information BirdsforMom4ever posted--a long reading list but very very informative on a lot of different angles----How old is the baby pigeon you found?? c.hert
It's from our Resources section but the site is big and sometimes new people don't find it. Cindy (AZWhitefeather) is the source. Charis made a good point, however. Heating pads are better provided you have one without automatic shut-off.

Haven't heard back yet from this member. I hope she will check again. Me375?
 

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I have found a baby crested pideon i need to no what to feed it ive been giving it wheatbix can some one please help me
Hi
This morning one baby just flew up to my wife’s shoulder as she was going to work. Its a Crested Pigeon ( Australian). I wonder if it was getting attacked or just flew out of the nest. It’s not scared and now even jumps on to my hand and shoulders.
How do I release it so it’s safe. Wait for a few days or immediately when I see some crested adults on the lawn this evening?
 

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He looks old enough to be able to fend for himself and not rely on his parents anymore. Is he eating by himself? What do the droppings look like? If he is eating and healthy, the droppings will be brown and firm with a white dot on top. It's unusual for a wild pigeon to approach people. Maybe he was handraised by someone and then released.
 

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He looks old enough t
Thanks for the info. It is a wild baby. I released him today but it keeps coming back, hangs around follows us and sits on the shoulder sometimes.
I have to keep my dogs locked in the house if this bird is out of its cage. Now I’m in a fix.
 

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No wild baby will ever come to a human and sit on his shoulder. They consider us as predators. This is a handraised baby that was released. He feels safer with humans than with his own kind. The person that raised him must live close to you, he would not have flown very far. Provide him with what he needs. If he prefers the safety of your home and your company, then so be it. You have a new pet now.
 

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Sad news & regret. Early morning I went and opened the cage but walked back indoors. Came back quite a bit later to find the bird had gone.
looked inside cage and feeding bowl to discover some blood splattered.
I have this annoyingly sad feeling that a goshawk I saw would have got it. Hope not but still the probability is there.
My family was not allowing another bird in our house and was causing a bit of friction. Already have a Cockatoo, Galah & a budgie.
Thinking back, I should have cared for it till it was a full grown adult so it could have a better chance of survival.
I just feel terrible
 

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I'm sorry to hear this, accidents can happen so easily and one does not always think about all these things. At least he did not die of starvation out there in the streets.
 
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