Pigeon-Talk banner

1 - 7 of 7 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
215 Posts
Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
Hi all,

My friend just found a pigeon who was hunched up and not moving. He knows I have pigeons and can get him to my vet (who rehabs pigeons) tomorrow (i.e. in about 6 hours). He has some experience working with birds; here is the information he gave me:

"Hi Howard, here is the rundown with our pigeon:

-11:05pm found the Pigeon on the North Side of the High Level Bridge in the west lane.

- the bird had dilated eyes, little movement no visible trauma. Not very responsive to traffic. . Minor flapping when caught.

- very calm but exhibiting shock. Kept warm, calm, and drk in a hoodie pocket.

- 11:45pm bird looked at by a vet assistant at Capital City. Confirmed no broken limbs. Fly away test (while in hand, moving up and down) did not result in flapping. Alert and warm feet. Eyes improving.

- 12:20am...Feet starting to cool off. Howard gets the Pigeon. Good liquid poop."

The pigeon's feet still feel cold. As I said I can get the bird to a vet soon - but I am looking for advice as to how to care for the pigeon in the mean time. So far I have him in a carrier, covered on the three sides facing the room with a thin blanket (with the side facing the wall uncovered for airflow). I have a (safe, oil-based) space heater close to him turned up reasonably high. Because I've heard that shock can involve loss of fluids I've put a container of water in his carrier in case he's able to drink (but I doubt he will). I have also put out a container of food.

I assume that I should NOT attempt to syringe feed this pigeon at this point (e.g. with water or Kaytee Exact Formula for Baby Birds - which I fed my pigeon NuNu when she was having trouble eating on her own). It would go against the general advice I know of for finding injured animals - the only reason I ask is that I saw that shock can have to do with loss of fluids; so if fluids in the next 6 hours could save the bird's life I wouldn't want to omit this. But I'd assume that if it's shock the greater danger is from being stressed by being handled (and fed in an unfamiliar way).

I'd be most grateful for any advice.

Thanks so much,
Howard
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
6,570 Posts
Howard, thanks for rescuing him! How is he doing today? Hope the warmth helped him stabilize. Did he drink or eat yet?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
29,795 Posts
IF you think he may be dehydrated, then don't feed him. Just offer fluids, as food should never be offered to a dehydrated bird. He must be hydrated and kept warm first.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,906 Posts
I think that you are on the right track Howard Nye and just continue what you are doing and have plenty of water for him to get at like you are doing and a safe private area like you are doing..Too much heat would be bad for him because he has feathers and could of bumped his head and had a sort of concussion so I would keep warm but not too hot especially with that type of heater--put on low--and keep the temperature about Maybe 80 degrees--or more depends on the air flow as well. Needs air flow and comfort and privacy at least until you get him to the avian vet or rehabbers when you can..I would not fool too much with him for now because of shock and being wild and very afraid and hoping he drinks and eats on his own real soon. You are doing the best that you can and birdie prayers are in order....Keep us posted...Thanks for taking care and caring...Sometimes these birdies are sneaky and if you cannot watch him for a time they eat and drink when no one is around so there is hope here. Where are you located in a warm climate or is it cooler for he needs to be warm but not too warm because of dehydrated maybe like you think and also those heaters make the air real dry as well in a small area. Make sure no "dry dust" is caused by that heater and Oh I hope he makes it but you are doing the best that you can right now and you could put water on your fingers and present to the outside of his beak and maybe he might show interest in sucking some off your fingers--maybe...hoping so....Best of luck....
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
215 Posts
Discussion Starter #5 (Edited)
Sad News

Hi All,

I deeply regret to report that the pigeon did not survive last night. When I came to monitor the room temperature at 4 AM he had passed away. I took his remains to my vet this morning and they are arranging for cremation.

My vet said that especially because of the suspicion that it was a strike case, the pigeon's death was likely due to head trauma and possibly other internal injuries. This is an unfortunate thing about strike victims - as you probably know many times they recover but sometimes the internal injuries are simply too severe. It is always well worth it to attempt to help them, and it often turns out well, but sadly not always.

I thanked my friend very much for the efforts on behalf of the pigeon, which gave the birdie the best chance we could, and which, had we had better luck, would have enabled him to pull through. As my vet said, even under these sad circumstances they at least enabled the pigeon to spend his final moments in warmth, peace and quiet, as free as possible from stress and fear.

Thanks very much for your input, which will definitely help should I or others I know come across a similar situation in the future.

Best,
Howard
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,906 Posts
You did the best that you could have done and feel bad for your loss and sometimes these type of injuries just turn out bad..So sorry..
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
6,570 Posts
Thank you for trying to save him and helping him spend his final time in comfort. Bless you. Sorry he didn't make it.
 
1 - 7 of 7 Posts
Top