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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
First of all, I read http://www.pigeons.biz/forums/f108/basic-steps-to-saving-the-life-of-a-pigeon-or-dove-8822.html which is quite helpful, and we're following the steps (step 1 raising temperature).

Now to the case in hand. I and mom found pigeon who was in the snow, in someone's footprint. How the bird got there or why is beyond me and most certainly weird (even if the bird for whatever reason tried to get warmth). My concerns are rather if the bird has any chance of surviving this is or is too far gone. I agreed to save the bird only because I thought freezing to death is kind of a hard way to go, I don't mind cats getting to the bird, but nowadays and especially during winter there aren't many cats around this block. So, only sensible thing was to take the bird in. Pigeon is secured (we have a cage, since we have two chinchillas who don't live/use the cage so often).

Now to the description. The bird is non-responsive. I mean opens/closes eyes, but movement is near to zero. When pigeon was first taken, then wings moved little, but basically pigeon is like a statue. I guess if you put it sideways, bird would stay sideways. And of course there is sign of breathing. Was the last time I checked. Right now is warmth step and in few hours should try to see if the bird drinks water or not (salt+sugar mixture, if I understood right).

In any case, I post only due to get some insight. Bird seems too far gone, just the matter of time. I've had similar experience with puppies (yes, I've found around 7 puppies who where left to die in winter). Just non-responsiveness is puzzling and we'll see if it changes. I am wondering, if we should try to give water only when the bird starts moving or sooner? Dehydration sounds weird during winter, but not that impossible due to frozen water. But that's the question, trying to give water should be attended when bird is responsive or even if the bird is non-responsive, but breathing/moving eyes?

It seems to be freezing issue as the bird holds tight, so I'd like to get some insight at this topic from people with similar experience.

Location: Estonia.

And should I be worried about diseases, I've cut chinchilla's access to the room where we keep pigeon, is that enough?

Regards,
Hurmet
 

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The pigeon just may need to warm up. A animals body will start to shut down when its core get too cold. An actually freezing to death is more humane than you would think. But that aside. Slowly warm its core. Then when the animal warms to the ambient temperature around it add some more heat like a heating pad. People sometimes add too much heat when a animal is frozen. This is not good as it will put a body into shock. Even cold weather rescues for people the hospital will gradually warm the body. As far as a disease it is most likely not going to transfer anything to the chinchilla as its bird to mammal. So separating them by rooms should be fine.
 

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Thank you for caring about this little one :)
NO Water or Food until he is warmed up first. Put on a heating pad covered with a towel set on LOW. Once he is warm, if showing more movement and responsive, put a small bowl of tepid (luke warm) water with a dash of salt and sugar in it. NO Food until he is rehydrated. Warmth and rehydration are the 1st most important steps.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Sadly, passed away some time ago. Did not respond to heating (we used rice in sock) in any way. Either there was something else wrong or we did something wrong/didn't do enough.

In any case, thanks for your help.
 

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Slow warm up. Rice in the sock, i hope was not hot. Or who knows, probably, it was too late. At least you tried.
 

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On the next occasion you find a bird out in the cold that appears to be suffering from hypothermia, try using a electric hair dryer. Blow warm air under the wings and in the birds face. Birds control their inner body temperature by the air sacs in their breathing system, so getting warm air into them with a hair dryer often works well. If you are out on the street somewhere, find a mens' rest room (or woman's) in a restaurant or store that has an electric hand dryer., and hold the bird face up into the hand dryer these places often have.

As an emergency measure it works well although some customers may see and wonder what it is you are up to.
 

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On the next occasion you find a bird out in the cold that appears to be suffering from hypothermia, try using a electric hair dryer. Blow warm air under the wings and in the birds face. Birds control their inner body temperature by the air sacs in their breathing system, so getting warm air into them with a hair dryer often works well. If you are out on the street somewhere, find a mens' rest room (or woman's) in a restaurant or store that has an electric hand dryer., and hold the bird face up into the hand dryer these places often have.

As an emergency measure it works well although some customers may see and wonder what it is you are up to.
I most certainly would not reccomend washroom driers !!!
1 - they are far too hot
2 - they are also too powerful

It is also not a good idea to blow dry air directly into a birds face,
by all means some lightly warmed air around and under wings, and from a distance with continual movement of the drier as constant up close heat from a drier can burn, even at a low temp.
 

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I've used a hand-held 1000-Watt hairdryer to dry pigeons quite often, after a necessary bath, almost never on the high setting. (Normally I let pigeons bathe themselves. I'm not a cleanness freak, in my opinion).

If the hot air steam was too hot for my inner wrist, it was too hot for the pigeon.

Also, I did not blow directly into the pigeon's face, so he did not inhale hot dry air. With my lung condition, I hate inhaling hot dry air, or even extremely hot damp air, so I won't subject a pigeon to something I feel is unnecessarily unpleasant.

I move the dryer back and forth over the pigeon's body so that there is no opportunity and not enough time for a hot spot to occur.

If the pigeon seems stressed after a minute or so, I stop.

For most of my cold rescues, I wrap them in a nylon tote back I usually carry with me, and tuck them inside my coat or sweater, next to my chest. If I can't do that, I hold them enveloped in my hands. When my hands feel warm from the build-up of reflected heat, I know the technique is working.

If I were in a public washroom hand dryer situation, like Qazar/Bob C says, they are too hot and too powerful. I would then try to deflect the air flow, so that the pigeon was in the backwash. Maybe bounce the air off a coat or rag or whatever balanced or draped over my thigh (to protect my thigh from the heat), or hold the pigeon near the floor, several feet away from the dryer nozzle.

Usually when I'm taking a rescue home (by bike or on foot, or on streetcar or bus), someone might think I'm pregnant or have recently developed a curious potbelly. LOL.
 
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