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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I found a pigeon on its back on the pavement. Possibly flew into a window. Seems quit young. Can not stand up.
had some water.
Have it inside with hay bedding.
it does not seem to have any injuries that I can see but can not stand. I touched it’s kegs snd spread its wings but does not wince. No open cuts.
what shall I do next snd what shall I feed it in the morning. Porridge ok?
 

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A bit of lemon juice in drinking water will provide electrolytes. About a teaspoon or less per cup of water -- more wouldn't harm the bird but might cause the bird to avoid drinking the water.

There are a lot of possible causes for symptoms of central nervous system issues such as being unable to stand or fly. Trauma from impact is one, many viral and bacterial infections can also be the cause and the bird can survive those infections and recover fully -- provided that the bird is in a safe place, and has food and water available. At times the bird may not be able to eat or drink on its own, and would benefit from assistance. It the bird is having trouble holding its head up, it would be best not to leave a deep dish of water with the bird, but rather use a very shallow dish.

Various foods are naturally antibiotic and/or antiviral which will assist the bird's immune system in fighting illness. Some examples are seeds such as cumin, fennel, peas, lentils, anise, and rosemary. Raw apple cider vinegar also helps and can be added to the bird's drinking water at about one teaspoon per quart/liter of water, and like lemon juice, more would be ok for the bird to drink as long as it doesn't cause the bird to reject the water completely. Probiotics may also help, and some can be added to the diet by including occasional tiny amounts of yogurt with "live cultures". Greek yogurt has less lactose which birds don't digest well, so it would be better then regular yogurt.

The diets of feral or wild pigeons and doves are frequently deficient in vitamin A. A few daily bits of chopped carrot or bell/chili pepper will provide plenty of vitamin A in a safe form. Some other vitamin and mineral deficiencies can cause symptoms such as weakness and inability to stand, walk, or fly -- insufficient B vitamins are one, and the combination of vitamin D, calcium, and phosphorus is another. All of those can be found in hard-boiled chicken eggs (all in the yolk, the whites are mostly protein.) Feeding the bird crumbled hard-boiled egg yolks along with seeds would ensure that the bird is getting some of all needed vitamins and minerals.

If the weather in your location is below 90 degrees Fahrenheit, provide additional warmth for the bird such as by wrapping a hot water bottle in a towel and placing it near the bird.
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
A bit of lemon juice in drinking water will provide electrolytes. About a teaspoon or less per cup of water -- more wouldn't harm the bird but might cause the bird to avoid drinking the water.

There are a lot of possible causes for symptoms of central nervous system issues such as being unable to stand or fly. Trauma from impact is one, many viral and bacterial infections can also be the cause and the bird can survive those infections and recover fully -- provided that the bird is in a safe place, and has food and water available. At times the bird may not be able to eat or drink on its own, and would benefit from assistance. It the bird is having trouble holding its head up, it would be best not to leave a deep dish of water with the bird, but rather use a very shallow dish.

Various foods are naturally antibiotic and/or antiviral which will assist the bird's immune system in fighting illness. Some examples are seeds such as cumin, fennel, peas, lentils, anise, and rosemary. Raw apple cider vinegar also helps and can be added to the bird's drinking water at about one teaspoon per quart/liter of water, and like lemon juice, more would be ok for the bird to drink as long as it doesn't cause the bird to reject the water completely. Probiotics may also help, and some can be added to the diet by including occasional tiny amounts of yogurt with "live cultures". Greek yogurt has less lactose which birds don't digest well, so it would be better then regular yogurt.

The diets of feral or wild pigeons and doves are frequently deficient in vitamin A. A few daily bits of chopped carrot or bell/chili pepper will provide plenty of vitamin A in a safe form. Some other vitamin and mineral deficiencies can cause symptoms such as weakness and inability to stand, walk, or fly -- insufficient B vitamins are one, and the combination of vitamin D, calcium, and phosphorus is another. All of those can be found in hard-boiled chicken eggs (all in the yolk, the whites are mostly protein.) Feeding the bird crumbled hard-boiled egg yolks along with seeds would ensure that the bird is getting some of all needed vitamins and minerals.

If the weather in your location is below 90 degrees Fahrenheit, provide additional warmth for the bird such as by wrapping a hot water bottle in a towel and placing it near the bird.
Ok thanks so much for this. Heating water for bottle now. I have found some Avi-viral multi vitamins I use for my chickens so am trying to give that. Plus lemon juice. Not drinking this morning though. Yesterday drank quite a bit when I got her home. Not interested in Carrot or seed right now but will keep trying. Also boiling egg.
will upload picture. Thank you!
 

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That's a youngster, but should be able to eat by himself.

Can you open his beak and check for any unusual yellow or whitish growths? Easier if you use a flashlight. Check deep inside his throat as well.

He might start eating when he feels more secure. If the droppings are green and creamy, then he is producing starvation droppings. If the throat is clear, you can also handfeed him green defrosted peas. Just put deep inside the beak over the tongue. Aim for 90 peas per day, divided into 3 meals of 30 each. This depends on the digestion. There should be plenty of droppings inbetween feedings.
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
That's a youngster, but should be able to eat by himself.

Can you open his beak and check for any unusual yellow or whitish growths? Easier if you use a flashlight. Check deep inside his throat as well.

He might start eating when he feels more secure. If the droppings are green and creamy, then he is producing starvation droppings. If the throat is clear, you can also handfeed him green defrosted peas. Just put deep inside the beak over the tongue. Aim for 90 peas per day, divided into 3 meals of 30 each. This depends on the digestion. There should be plenty of droppings inbetween feedings.
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
Thanks Maria.
yes I though he/she was young.
ok thanks for all those tips. I just put her to bedso won’t disturb again tonight but will check for all that in the morning. What are those yellow white things?
shes drinking plenty of the vitamin water so at least she’s getting some good stuff.
will get some ideas tomorrow too.
thank you.
 

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Discussion Starter · #19 ·
Hi Maria
Still not eating the peas. Drinking quite a bit of water.
I tried to upload a video but can’t. Throat is clear no white or yellow spots. Nice a pink.
Standing a bit better but needs to lean back. As soon as she leans forward she toppled over
 

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Post a photo of her droppings plse. Do you think the crop is waterfilled and that's why she topples over? Might have yeast/sour crop.

Start adding apple cider vinegar (natural unfiltered brand with the mother) to her drinking water. 5 ml acv to 1 litre of water. Can you get Nystatin from a pharmacy?
 
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