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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hi everyone,

I feel lucky to have found this forum. There are two white pigeons roosting on the corner of my roof. My neighbor said there were 3 yesterday morning, but I've only seen the two. Unfortunately, there are some neighborhood cats that run loose and I'm hoping they didn't get at the 3rd. So what should I do?

I've been feeding them a wild bird seed mix and put some shredded paper in a large pet carrier on the roof for shelter. I also put out some water in a deep dish. I haven't tried to catch them but I do have a large have-a-heart trap I could use.

They are not banded, but look like the birds used at weddings, pure white. From all appearances, they seem to be healthy, but it's funny that they don't fly in the tree for shade... they hang out on the roof where it's hot.

Should I just let them be and keep feeding them? They stick together like glue, it's actually very cute. But I am concerned about their safety. Luckily it looks like nice weather for the next day or two, but if they're not wild, I am concerned about how they'd fair in a storm. And there is the worry about the cats. Any suggestions?
 

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Can you take a picture so we can figure out whether these are pigeons or lost ringneck doves?
How big are they?
What do they sound like?

White birds can easily be caught by predators, they might do better if you caught them and kept them for your own. Also, if they are domesticated birds, they may not have the foraging skills to stay healthy and strong--I would keep feeding them.

Also, I don't know about your area, but we've been getting some pretty bad storms. I know wild birds make it through, but I'm kind of a sap I guess and I would be worried about them too.
 

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I really wish that this practice of using doves and pigeons sold in a box not trained to return home for weddings was made illegal......it is a cruel and horrible outcome for the birds !!!

I hope you are able to catch them and offer them a safe home or perhaps find someone that possibly could . I wish you success !!

Darren
 

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I really wish that this practice of using doves and pigeons sold in a box not trained to return home for weddings was made illegal......it is a cruel and horrible outcome for the birds !!!

I hope you are able to catch them and offer them a safe home or perhaps find someone that possibly could . I wish you success !!

Darren
homers do not need to be trained they already home on their own.. but they do need to be in shape and mature enough to make the trip..and sometimes there are hawks that can scatter them and they get off course and end up on someone's roof.. if they stay a few days and do not fly off to home they will need some help.. IF these are pigeons.. the white pigeon's homing instincts sometimes is not as good as racing homers as they are bred for color and should not be taken out too far and released.. and of course the white ringneck doves should never be released.... the real problem is the non banding.. release birds should have a custom band so the owner can be found in case a bird or several get off track...it happens.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 · (Edited)
These pictures were taken last night. I can get within about 3 or 4 feet but then they fly away, though not far. Is there any chance they could be wild?

I haven't heard them make a sound, they're very quiet. Seem to be about medium size. We also had some bad storms here last week so maybe they just need to get their strength up. Just wish I knew that they were safe. They ARE eating the birdseed I scatter, but I don't know if they're drinking. I did get a deep water bowl.
 

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from the pics they do look like white homers.. but not in good condition..the feathers look loose and they do look thin to me just from what I can see over a computer.. if you have a large or medium dog crate and can put some paper in bottom ready and waiting..perhaps you can find where they roost at night and grab them then..they usually do not move alot at night as they can not see well.. Im sure the seed is much apprectated and needed.. you can try if you want to get a cat litter pan from the dollar store and fill it with water in the yard if your there..they may be interested and drink and bath in that. also there are traps out there you can make.. like the old box leaning on a stick with feed under it and pull the string and the box lands over top of the bird and traps it..but if there is two that would be hard as if you do get one with it the other may get wise to the box and not go near it.. I do think they would or may be too light weight for the havaheart.
 

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homers do not need to be trained they already home on their own.. but they do need to be in shape and mature enough to make the trip..and sometimes there are hawks that can scatter them and they get off course and end up on someone's roof.. if they stay a few days and do not fly off to home they will need some help.. IF these are pigeons.. the white pigeon's homing instincts sometimes is not as good as racing homers as they are bred for color and should not be taken out too far and released.. and of course the white ringneck doves should never be released.... the real problem is the non banding.. release birds should have a custom band so the owner can be found in case a bird or several get off track...it happens.
I am not sure I totally agree that homers do not need to be trained to return home , especially if the birds are ordered and flown into another state for a wedding . Many inexperienced fliers have tossed and lost birds taken on flights 5 miles or less . Usually trained homers are taken short distances and then these distances are eventually increased , but I doubt that birds shoved in a box that end up being emaciated and stressed and scared out of their witts are in any way shape or form prepared to fly back home if in fact they have ever seen the outside of the loft to which they were bred . This does not include reputable white dove release business that care for their birds and their welfare .

All this aside I thinks it's wonderful Jan is concerned about the birds welfare and again I wish her well !
 

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Where are you Jan?
 

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I am not sure I totally agree that homers do not need to be trained to return home , especially if the birds are ordered and flown into another state for a wedding . Many inexperienced fliers have tossed and lost birds taken on flights 5 miles or less . Usually trained homers are taken short distances and then these distances are eventually increased , but I doubt that birds shoved in a box that end up being emaciated and stressed and scared out of their witts are in any way shape or form prepared to fly back home if in fact they have ever seen the outside of the loft to which they were bred . This does not include reputable white dove release business that care for their birds and their welfare .

All this aside I thinks it's wonderful Jan is concerned about the birds welfare and again I wish her well !
I have never seen any evidence of birds in a box shipped to another state and released just for a wedding here in the USA.. so it must be something done more where you live...some unknowing people may buy doves and pigeons not knowing and release them.. but do not think it is wide spread and not the fault of white dove releasers who know what their doing. pigeons are born with the instinct to home..some are better at it than others..it is just a fact, not an opinion. a person with allot of ferals wanted to release them to a safe park 50 miles from home.. they were back before she was and those are ferals never "trained" so to speak.. so yes they home on their own, but need to be healthy, mature, and in shape to do it well..just like a cyclist would getting stronger for the miles he needs to do, but he already knows how to ride the bike..another example was a young bird..never flown..sold shipped to a new owner..the first time out the young bird flew all the way back home..where was the training to home there?.. they already know how... Iam not going to say I know how or where these pigeons came from ..could be anything.. a road toss gone wrong with a predator after them.. a new pigeon keeper not keeping healthy pigeons and released them.. poor bred birds.. who knows.. I sure would not want someone thinking bad of me if a few of my birds got off track.. so that is where the bands come in..which is really important for anyone doing releases away from home should have on their birds so one can find the owner..
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
I'm in northern NJ. Just went out and don't see them on the roof anymore, but it's mid-day and very hot. I expect they'll come out of hiding later in the afternoon.

In the meantime, I'm headed out to get litter box now. Thanks for the great suggestion.
 

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Keep feeding them! I am in NJ too and recently had an unbanded mostly white bird show up. It was around for 2 weeks although it avoided my attempts to catch it. Oddly it did not seem interested in my pigeons, but otherwise looked healthy. Unfortunately it ended up getting hit by a car this past weekend before I could catch it (I tried!!). The havahart may be worth a try, alhtough I never saw one used for pigeons, it couldn't hurt. BTW, if you can catch them this is a great forum....you will find advice on everything you need. You may become enamored with these great birds as so many on here have and decide to keep them. They can become quite tame and yes they can be kept outside all year, in a suitable enclosure (a dry protected area and an area with a flypen where they can sun themselves and bathe. But I may be getting ahead of things............keep an eye on them and catch them first. They may very well be roosting nearby and they already learned that they can find seed on your property.
 

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I'm in northern NJ. Just went out and don't see them on the roof anymore, but it's mid-day and very hot. I expect they'll come out of hiding later in the afternoon.

In the meantime, I'm headed out to get litter box now. Thanks for the great suggestion.
You may be able to trap them using one of the the simple homemade traps in this link.

http://www.racingbirds.com/ptrap.html
 

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Discussion Starter · #13 ·
Thanks for the trap link. They're back on the roof again. There's plenty of food & water around the house and on the lower part of the roof. If I am able to catch them I'll post it ... and will have an entirely new set of questions at that point. But for now, at least I'm glad they're up high enough that I don't have to worry about cats.
 

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Thanks for the trap link. They're back on the roof again. There's plenty of food & water around the house and on the lower part of the roof. If I am able to catch them I'll post it ... and will have an entirely new set of questions at that point. But for now, at least I'm glad they're up high enough that I don't have to worry about cats.
After feeding them in the same spot for a couple days, put the trap in that spot with food inside. No food anywhere else nearby. Your best bet with two pigeons is the second trap, as you can catch them each in turn. In fact, if they are looking for food at their usual spot, and one goes in to get food in the trap, the other is likely to follow if it sees the first one eating.
 

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Discussion Starter · #16 ·
Have been trying but have had no luck. There is water around the house in cat litter boxes and I put one up on the roof too but haven't seen them go for a bath. This afternoon I saw the two of them up there but tonight there was only one.

Not sure how this is going to turn out but I do want to thank everyone for their help. If my luck changes tomorrow and I'm able to successfully catch them, I'll let you know.
 

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if you get a chance to be up there on the roof at night bring a flashlight~ turn it on right onto their eyes and let yourself and your hands stay on the dark so they can't see you and they will only see the bright light~ then quickly grab them by the center of their back like pushing them not too tightly against the wall or against the floor though it's a little bit harsh just to ensure you have them with best intentions for them... it's difficult to do it if they're near with each other but it's easy if they stick tightly together like one and more easier if they are far apart from each other so that you may grab them one by one~ (it's easier if you use a trap when you have one) just touch them gently afterwards especially on their cheek, the sides of their beak and above there nose or ceres to make them feel okay and safe^^ this is very effective to me always when i try catching my pigeons at night~ (just sharing a tip if anyone doesn't have any traps) it's easy to catch them on daytime if you have lots of pigeons that flock together tightly when feeding so the pigeon you want to catch will join them and they may not see you go near them because they flock tightly and feeding~ (this is a bit difficult for others) when you see that the pigeon just focuses on the food without trying to look at what is happening around just slowly bend your knees on the floor and slowly move your hands nearer to catch it while you continue to fall feeds on that hand(they'll think you're just falling foods for them)~ when it still doesn't mind and still focuses on the food then quickly grab him/her~ this doesn't work always and it's still best to have traps.. your pigeons might fly nervous but they'll be fine again just throw some foods again and go with the pigeon in your hand~ it's best if your own birds are hungry so they would flock that close to each other on feeding time... just sharing what works for me^__^
 

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Discussion Starter · #18 ·
Thanks for the tips. I'd be a little nervous doing this, but could try. I had not seen either of them since late yesterday when just the one was on the roof... but driving home this afternoon I did see them on the ground in a field by the house, pecking around on the ground. Is it possible that they are learning to get along on their own? I still have the food & water out, but they're not on the roof tonight.
 

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Thanks for the tips. I'd be a little nervous doing this, but could try. I had not seen either of them since late yesterday when just the one was on the roof... but driving home this afternoon I did see them on the ground in a field by the house, pecking around on the ground. Is it possible that they are learning to get along on their own? I still have the food & water out, but they're not on the roof tonight.
They can probably do okay on their own for a short while. In the long run, domestic pigeons cannot fend for themselves in the feral world. What would be best for the birds is if you can catch them and find their owner or a home for them.
 
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