Pigeon-Talk banner
1 - 7 of 7 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
71 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Does anyone have an experience racing the offspring of half siblings? Because I do only have limited breeders, 2 cocks and 3 hens, and I,m just focused on them and avoid introducing another lines so I can distinguish my best pairing.. All of my race team are almost related to each other, I mean some of them have same dam with different sires, Half brother and Half sister.. Is it possible to race their offspring? Because I'm planning to breed them couple of months after the race.. So I'm just wondering if their future offspring's are for stocks or can be raced.. Thanks!!!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,016 Posts
Contrary to the majority (this includes me as a newbie), having a few pairs and building a family to start is better than crowding your entire loft with different pairs/families/bloodlines from many different people from different parts of the country. I've bred from grandkids that are related, but not half brother/sister. I think the route you're going is a good one. Who knows, before you know it, you'll have a loft full of related birds.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,756 Posts
I think that is a great way to proceed. You do not want to get too line bred/inbred though. Many say that you line breed for stock and cross out for racers. I have found that cousins and aunts and uncles make good crossings. I keep my lines pretty pure, but do introduce a few new birds each year as I eliminate sub-par birds.

I would probably introduce one more quality pair so you will have some blood to cross. They could even be from the same family, just a bit more genetic diversity.

Looking back at how Vic Miller crossed into his lines from my pedigrees, he would introduce a key bird into his line. The siblings I have are 1/8th Jos Thone. This way he keeps a bit of diversity in his birds. A bit of Hybrid Vigor while still keeping his blood close.

i am pulling three birds with new blood this year. I originally started with 12 birds and narrowed it down to about four pair. In the four pair were two sets of siblings. This allowed me many ways to keep the birds a bit diverse for racing. 8 of the 12 had the common Vic Miller bloodline. I will put Grandmother to Grandson for stock.

Most of the birds I have brought in thus far are from my blood crossed with others that have performed well. This way the blood stays close and proven blood adds a bit of diversity.

Randy
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
5,367 Posts
Contrary to the majority (this includes me as a newbie), having a few pairs and building a family to start is better than crowding your entire loft with different pairs/families/bloodlines from many different people from different parts of the country. I've bred from grandkids that are related, but not half brother/sister. I think the route you're going is a good one. Who knows, before you know it, you'll have a loft full of related birds.
:)

My thoughts exactly.

Start with the best you can get your hands on. Keep the best for breeding, and try different pairings. Some genetic lines will not work out well with close pairings, some will. Even those that do, not every combination will bear fruit. I have a full bro x sis pairing that produces a lot of club winners, but when paired to their parents, does not work out well at all.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,016 Posts
I will however try a couple "test" pairs a year. The main reason behind that is to eventually linebreed a bird (most likely a hen) and cross it into my main family.
 
1 - 7 of 7 Posts
Top