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Rollers are easy prey for hawks. Sorry, that is given to me after hearing so many reports from roller fanciers here in California. They may even get your best rollers--those deep, frequent, fast rollers.

Falcon and pigeon co-evolved together. But I believe not with rollers such as Birmingham. I think nature has evolved oriental rollers, doneks, etc. for such falcon attacks and hawks.

I locked down after attack because I know the hawk will be back (I noticed that). I do lockdown about a week. I think locking them longer than that makes them easy prey especially when they get fat not doing anything.
 

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Those people that got arrested in California were really frustrated with their hawk problems that they violated the laws. That should tell you that Birmingham rollers get more of the brunt from hawks to push them over the edge. As I said before rollers are easier prey for hawks than homing pigeons (that is no CRAP!). Obviously this is not all or nothing. Some will survive. If you go to roller forum site you will hear that even their best rollers gets taken--that one that rolled the most gets taken. And because rollers seem to show their rolling skill around 1 year old that is a long way to wait. How frustrating that would be to train an animal, wait for almost a year to see the result and you end up taken?
 

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Those people that got arrested are not color breeders. They compete in roller competition. Those fireball roller are deep rollers. I think the hawk just waits until those birds get tired and hits them. That is the way my resident hawks does it. It waits on a tree where my loft happens to be, then when my birds land it attacks them. It will also wait to the next door neighbor's tree. I tried throwing something in the air to scare it, but it learned to ignore me. My observation is that hawks adapt as well. I still remember that hawk vividly waited for my birds on a tree for almost one hour until my birds started landing. Then it swooped. Very clever. I have also observed that some hawks just don't have much patience and leave the place if they didn't get any the first try. I like those. The persistent ones I don't like. Thus far this spring the hawk is ignoring my birds. I suppose there are a lot of other foods out there.
 

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I saw with my own eyes that Coopers can catch prey from the air. One is with sparrow and several are my birds. Obviously both prey and predator falls to the ground. Nevertheless, I think hawks do more damage ambush style where the bird is just sitting down and gets hit. I think that's what hawk uses more often as tactic.
 
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