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I recommend flying them later in the evening after most of the coopers hawks have eaten.
You can also feed train them, so that they will come into the loft as soon as you call them, so that if you do see a hawk, you can get them in before they are attacked.
To feed train them simply make the same noise every time you feed them and they will quicly associate it with being fed. You can shake a can of corn, whistle or say anything as long as you are always consistent.
Don't let you pigeons perch out in the open. You want them up in the air flying, where they are harder to catch or safely ensconced in the loft.
If you have slower pigeons, like rollers, they still may be caught out of the air, but they a better chance to get away then they do sitting on a perch.
Keith
 

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There are plenty of threads on this forum about hawks. I suggest you do a search and read up on them. Hawks are always part of the day to day when it comes to pigeons. It's just that some have it worse than others. Good luck!
 

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I can't help you much on this one because I am myself a victim of so many hawk encounters. I now try to fly my birds between when the hawk appears. So I usually try to find the pattern for this hawk that I have. I usually lock down my birds couple of days to 1 week after I get hit because from experience they comes back the next day after an attack. There are many theories on how to prevent hawk attacks like flying bottled rockets for example to scare them. Putting some owl figure on alternate places is also one of them.
 

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Thats good reasoning about flying your birds late in the day .... the hawks would be more likely to be tired from a long day of hunting , and if they were successful wouldn't have much of an appetite to chase your birds , as they would be fresh and energetic . Of course like with all theories , sometimes it doesnt work as planned , but it sounds like a pretty good idea .

hambone
 

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use the search tool

If you would use the search in the blue bar across the top type in hawks and you will get over 500 post on this subject. GEORGE;)
 

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Hahaha....so true. We are basically trying different methods of preventing getting predated, but it doesn't always works all the time. This week my birds were hesitant getting out and I didn't know why. It was eerily quiet, too. When they took off apparently a hawk was waiting for them from the tree. As fast that happens a crow also swooped on the hawk. Crows saved me again! Hawks are assassins and ambush killers. Would it be cool if we have some detection technology that tells us a hawk is around? That way we don't accidentally release our birds and get hit. We need that technology because our eyesight is not good enough.
 

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I put out pans of cracked corn to attract a noisy, but helpful band of crows. They get really noisy and alert me to anything going on the air...a mallard fight or a hawk on the prowl...whatever...crows are like nature's burglar alarm....:D
 

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This week my birds were hesitant getting out and I didn't know why. It was eerily quiet, too.
The eerily quiet was a great clue .. when the little birds go into hiding and go silent, you KNOW there's a predator present. In my yard, I am always very aware of whether the sparrows, finches, starlings, mourning doves are out and about .. if they aren't .. then danger is near. Also, if the crows are going off or if I have a goose here that is sounding off, then there is something wrong in the yard, and I always go see what's going on. Truly .. if the little wild birds in your yard have gone quiet and "disappeared" then you best not let your pigeons out just then.

Terry
 

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The eerily quiet was a great clue .. when the little birds go into hiding and go silent, you KNOW there's a predator present. In my yard, I am always very aware of whether the sparrows, finches, starlings, mourning doves are out and about .. if they aren't .. then danger is near. Also, if the crows are going off or if I have a goose here that is sounding off, then there is something wrong in the yard, and I always go see what's going on. Truly .. if the little wild birds in your yard have gone quiet and "disappeared" then you best not let your pigeons out just then.

Terry
That is a great point!...I have done this as we have a bird feeder, when everyone is chirpy and hangin out all is well, when I don't see hide nor feather...look out....my chickens too are real keen...the rooster will make a high pitch sound of warning.
 

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Terry,

Thanks for the tip. I actually use that gauge after that experience. I let my sparrows who built a nests near my loft as my alarm guide.
 
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