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I have bought 12 young birds to start training. We kept them in for 16 days and then started letting them out to fly. I flew them four times in which they had extended their flight pattern to over half a mile.

After talking to a couple different breeders (was not able to get ahold of the original seller), I took the risk and took them out 2 miles from the house to release them. After all I would think someone in the business for 20 yrs would know what they are talking about and they said they release 30 miles away from flight one.

I learned a very valuable lesson about releasing them close to another home. They are currently roosted on top of my father-in-law to be's house. (This is 3 hours after release). They show no signs of wishing to leave either.

They are pretty tame and will USUALLY come to feed no matter where they are. I was able to walk right up to them, however when I bent over to pick them up they made it into a huge game. Tired and frustrated I gave up and came home.

When I finally was able to reach the seller and told him what I did, I was told I pushed the birds to fast. Lesson again learned.

The question now is....HOW DO YOU CATCH BIRDS THAT ARE CONFUSED AS TO WHERE HOME IS? They are flying back and forth between my brother in law and father in law to be's house. (Better there will be plenty of Jokes about this in years to come.)

I want to humanly catch them and bring them back for me intense training. Our wedding is Feb 14th and I am scared I will not have them ready to go in time. Am looking at purchasing more birds with hopes after they are trained they could lead the others home. I know wishful thinking.
 

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How long had they been flying from the loft on their own before you started road training? And how old were these birds?
 

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How long had they been flying from the loft on their own before you started road training? And how old were these birds?
Good questions, also how far is the church from your house? Since the main goal is the wedding in Feb.

Put a basket held up with a stick in the yard and a bowl of feed under it. Let the birds see you put the feed under the basket. When they go eat, pull string and collect birds caught.

Good luck,
Tony
 

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routing

I send my birds 20 miles on their first toss But I don't do this until they are routing off for more than an hour. From a birds eye view a pigeon can see 12 miles to the horizon and if he's routing off 15 to 20 miles he certainly can find home. I haven't lost a YB yet. Joe Rotondo in his book recommends a 40 mile first toss. Be patient don't rush them. They will be flying as far as you want them to by Feb.
Try not feeding them on your father's roof. make them come home for food. They will get hungry enough and come home.
 

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My birds don't even go a full 5 miles for their first road toss. After 5 they go to 10, then in increments of 10. But there's a million different ways to do things. If someone tells you to take them 30 or so miles for their first toss, then go ahead. But you better have the same birds, loft, and methods up to that point if you expect them all to come home. Different birds can handle different things, depending on genetics and what you do for them.
 

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Try tossing them somewhere more open next time so there are no houses or trees to land on, that way they can get up and fly, I loft flew mine for several weeks before I took them anywhere.
 

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Try tossing them somewhere more open next time so there are no houses or trees to land on, that way they can get up and fly, I loft flew mine for several weeks before I took them anywhere.
Same here, I loft fly and will even basket train the first few times within site of the loft. Just to get them use to the basket before I take them down the road.

Tony
 

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You did note take them too far for their first toss, assuming you were accurate with the routing they did prior. It was just bad luck or WHERE you released them.

A couple of suggestions. Next year, take a couple of old birds with them for those first couple of tosses.

As for now, use a long handled fishing net and catch them on whatever roof they are perching on, AT NIGHT. If you do not, the owls will eventually get them (or the hawks). Do one bird at a time. They will startle but probably not fly more than ten feet or so, if you do it carefully. But you will have to be fast with the net. You can not slip it over them slowly and gently.

I suspect you let them out in an area that was not open enough to make them fly right away. If you let them out a a location that was convenient because you were going to visit someone anyway, then that might have contributed to the problem. Roofs are inviting places to land after being released. Let them out in an open field area and you can see what they do. It is fun to watch them circle and figure out which way is home. They will not want to land on the ground. But roofs are inviting looking.

So, go to Wal-Mart and get a fishing net with a handle approximately six foot long. Good Luck.
 
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