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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Any one raised or is raising a pigeon since it was a squab?

I have a baby satinettes that are about a week to two old, and I wanted to turn it into a house pet. Train it to fly to me and what not. Any tips, advice or videos?
 

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How did you come by the baby?
 

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I have babies born in my loft, and I handle them from the time they are a week old. I hand feed treats and seed to the parents at the nest box, and eventually the babies join them. Of course you can only do that if the parents are friendly. The little ones see that the parents are okay with me, so they assume I'm friend and not foe. They usually become very friendly that way. I think it's kind of mean to both the babies and the parents to take them at an early age. That time is important to both of them. If you use patience, and spend time with them, they will learn to trust you, which is what you want. I personally wouldn't make a normal healthy pigeon into a house pet, as they are always happier with their flock. That is much more natural, and they should be able to mate up and live as a pigeon. As a house pet, they are lonelier, as you can't be with them 24/7, and they begin to see you as a mate, which isn't really a normal healthy situation for them. They are happiest when they are doing what they live to do, and that is to find a mate, build a nest and lay eggs. I would only keep for a house pet, a bird that couldn't be in with the others because of a handicap or something. I do spend a lot of time in the loft with my birds, and interact with them. Most are very friendly. But I still allow them to be a pigeon, which is what is natural for them. They can live for 15 to 20 years. Are you really able to commit a LOT or time and energy to a pigeon that is now accustom to people rather than other birds? Can you do that for 20 years? Sitting in a cage most of the day, and having a few hours a day out of cage time. And even then, being alone, unless you are willing to interact with him for those few hours. Where do you think he would be more happy?
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Ok .. that made sense. In that case, how could I make my pigeons trust me more? I just started raising pigeons. I have 1 pair satinettes, and 3 pairs of homers. When I fed my pigeons, my checker pair were the first pigeons that weren't to afraid to eat in front of me. They led the others. I want the bond close to the point were I can feed by hand.
 

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Hey VsyVirus :)
My sister and I have raised a little English Short Faced Tumbler...we raised him from when he was a week old, as his parents couldn't feed him (long story, but this breed has short beaks and the parents often find feeding their babies difficult). His name is Pipi, and he is now 1 and a half years old.
Anyways, due to the fact I work from home, I was able/am still able to spend a lot of time with Pipi.
From my experience, there are both cons and pros to raising pigeons as house pets.

My story...here it is...
Pip and I developed a bond quickly, and this is clear to see right up til today.

UP UNTIL 6 MONTHS OF AGE: I would feed Pipi for hours a day, and play with him...by 'play with him', I mean constant talking and 'body contact'. Tickling, rubbing his neck, stroking him in a downward motion down the wings...I quickly found out Pipi loved his back and belly rubbed too. When he was lying down, he'd be facing me, and know he was getting love from me.

It takes patience and a lot of talking. It has to be a gentle bonding. Not forced. For example, there was a time Pipi was a bit paranoid about me stroking his tail. He'd be lying down, and the second I'd touch his tail, he'd turn his head to give me a 'look'. So, I'd take my hand away, return to rubbing his back or neck, and try again later. The phase lasted about a week. And then, he realised I wasn't going to pull his tail out or something, hehe, and fully relaxed.

When Pip was 6 MONTHS OLD I bought him a 'hutch' kinda cage, and put him outdoors.
And this is where the 'pros' began to turn into 'cons'.

Since work got a bit busy at that stage, I couldn't spend as much time with Pipi, and the 'lonliness' set in. I swear to God he felt ostracized by me back then. He'd claw the cage wanting out, staring at the screen door waiting for me to appear. On hearing my voice, he'd start 'cooing'...absolutely heartbreaking, I felt like guilty crap for it all. I'd have to go out, pick him up and calm him down like he was a toddler.

7 MONTHS OF AGE:
Got Pipi a mate, a female Tumbler named Lulu.
It took Pipi a month and half for Pipi to 'accept' her as a friend in his cage.

9 MONTHS OF AGE: The heartbreaking 'cooing' for me stopped. But our bond still continued on. He started thinking I was his girl at this point, and try 'mount' me. He got into this 'kissing' my fingers, hands and cheeks phase, that has kept up til today.
Lulu, his mate, developed a crush on Pipi yet got no response from Pipi.

ONE AND A HALF YEARS ON/NOW:
Pipi has now - finally -begun to court Lulu. So, the dude has a busy life. When I'm not around, he's chasing Lulu. And when I'm around, he's kissing, being cheeky with me.
Whilst we are in the sun, he'll flatten out on his favourite spot - my right chest - to catch the sun's rays. The little bugger thinks he's in heaven when he's been stroked and lying on me. He'll fan his tail and spread his wings, completely lose any sense of self control and become a pancake. He'll stare at me and nod, its very endearing and funny.

I still feed him, as his beak is criss-crossed and self feeding is hard for him.
I love him to bits. I never thought pigeons could have that much personilty or affection to give, but they do. :) Its a actual 'buddy'-ship we have going on.

So...my advice...unless you're willing and able to devote yourself wholeheartedly to your pigeon baby, I think Jay3 is right. The lonliness factor does kick in. One thing I learnt is, pigeons seriously have 'feelings'. They develop feelings and they have a memory that will astound you. Its a awesome experience.

Good luck!! :):)
 

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Wonderful story AlicjanPip.
I am happy that you got him a mate and still be bounded with you :)
PIPI is one of the luckiest pigeons.
 

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Hey VsyVirus :)
My sister and I have raised a little English Short Faced Tumbler...we raised him from when he was a week old, as his parents couldn't feed him (long story, but this breed has short beaks and the parents often find feeding their babies difficult). His name is Pipi, and he is now 1 and a half years old.
Anyways, due to the fact I work from home, I was able/am still able to spend a lot of time with Pipi.
From my experience, there are both cons and pros to raising pigeons as house pets.

My story...here it is...
Pip and I developed a bond quickly, and this is clear to see right up til today.

UP UNTIL 6 MONTHS OF AGE: I would feed Pipi for hours a day, and play with him...by 'play with him', I mean constant talking and 'body contact'. Tickling, rubbing his neck, stroking him in a downward motion down the wings...I quickly found out Pipi loved his back and belly rubbed too. When he was lying down, he'd be facing me, and know he was getting love from me.

It takes patience and a lot of talking. It has to be a gentle bonding. Not forced. For example, there was a time Pipi was a bit paranoid about me stroking his tail. He'd be lying down, and the second I'd touch his tail, he'd turn his head to give me a 'look'. So, I'd take my hand away, return to rubbing his back or neck, and try again later. The phase lasted about a week. And then, he realised I wasn't going to pull his tail out or something, hehe, and fully relaxed.

When Pip was 6 MONTHS OLD I bought him a 'hutch' kinda cage, and put him outdoors.
And this is where the 'pros' began to turn into 'cons'.

Since work got a bit busy at that stage, I couldn't spend as much time with Pipi, and the 'lonliness' set in. I swear to God he felt ostracized by me back then. He'd claw the cage wanting out, staring at the screen door waiting for me to appear. On hearing my voice, he'd start 'cooing'...absolutely heartbreaking, I felt like guilty crap for it all. I'd have to go out, pick him up and calm him down like he was a toddler.

7 MONTHS OF AGE:
Got Pipi a mate, a female Tumbler named Lulu.
It took Pipi a month and half for Pipi to 'accept' her as a friend in his cage.

9 MONTHS OF AGE: The heartbreaking 'cooing' for me stopped. But our bond still continued on. He started thinking I was his girl at this point, and try 'mount' me. He got into this 'kissing' my fingers, hands and cheeks phase, that has kept up til today.
Lulu, his mate, developed a crush on Pipi yet got no response from Pipi.

ONE AND A HALF YEARS ON/NOW:
Pipi has now - finally -begun to court Lulu. So, the dude has a busy life. When I'm not around, he's chasing Lulu. And when I'm around, he's kissing, being cheeky with me.
Whilst we are in the sun, he'll flatten out on his favourite spot - my right chest - to catch the sun's rays. The little bugger thinks he's in heaven when he's been stroked and lying on me. He'll fan his tail and spread his wings, completely lose any sense of self control and become a pancake. He'll stare at me and nod, its very endearing and funny.

I still feed him, as his beak is criss-crossed and self feeding is hard for him.
I love him to bits. I never thought pigeons could have that much personilty or affection to give, but they do. :) Its a actual 'buddy'-ship we have going on.

So...my advice...unless you're willing and able to devote yourself wholeheartedly to your pigeon baby, I think Jay3 is right. The lonliness factor does kick in. One thing I learnt is, pigeons seriously have 'feelings'. They develop feelings and they have a memory that will astound you. Its a awesome experience.

Good luck!! :):)

Thank you for sharing that story. I think that Pip is a very lucky little guy, in that you care so much for him, and took the time to understand his needs.
 

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Ok .. that made sense. In that case, how could I make my pigeons trust me more? I just started raising pigeons. I have 1 pair satinettes, and 3 pairs of homers. When I fed my pigeons, my checker pair were the first pigeons that weren't to afraid to eat in front of me. They led the others. I want the bond close to the point were I can feed by hand.

I have a loft of rescues, and when they come here, most are not very trusting. I spend a lot of time with them and get to know each one, and their personality. No two are alike. Some are calm, while others are flighty and nervous in personality. They get used to me, as I am the feeder, the main cleaner of the loft, and the one who offers treats at the end of the day. Most pigeons love chopped unsalted peanuts. They don't even recognize them as food at first, so I mix them into their feed. Eventually they try them, and once they do, they love them. It's like they're addicting. LOL. After a while, they will fly to me for a treat. They get used to me being around a lot, and they learn that I'm not going to harm them. The thing is that you have to let them build trust in you, and that doesn't happen over night. Some will become friendly more quickly than others. You have to let them come to you in their time. You can't force it on them. That only scares them. They will see that the others come to you and are not harmed, and eventually, they will too. If some are too nervous or frightened to come to me, or take the treat out of my hand, that's okay. I just leave theirs in the box or on their perch where they can enjoy it. Patience is how you will win them over. But it is always on their terms, not on ours. You will learn to love and enjoy each one for their own personality. Just don't rush it, and except them the way they are. You will find that they will come to you when they are allowed to do that freely. It takes time, but so what? You have all the time in the world. Treats help a lot to break the ice.
 

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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
Yea I can't promise I will have absolute time like that. Nor would I want him/her to always be lonely. so I guess another good way I would like is for them to be around me without fear.

Hey VsyVirus :)
My sister and I have raised a little English Short Faced Tumbler...we raised him from when he was a week old, as his parents couldn't feed him (long story, but this breed has short beaks and the parents often find feeding their babies difficult). His name is Pipi, and he is now 1 and a half years old.
Anyways, due to the fact I work from home, I was able/am still able to spend a lot of time with Pipi.
From my experience, there are both cons and pros to raising pigeons as house pets.

My story...here it is...
Pip and I developed a bond quickly, and this is clear to see right up til today.

UP UNTIL 6 MONTHS OF AGE: I would feed Pipi for hours a day, and play with him...by 'play with him', I mean constant talking and 'body contact'. Tickling, rubbing his neck, stroking him in a downward motion down the wings...I quickly found out Pipi loved his back and belly rubbed too. When he was lying down, he'd be facing me, and know he was getting love from me.

It takes patience and a lot of talking. It has to be a gentle bonding. Not forced. For example, there was a time Pipi was a bit paranoid about me stroking his tail. He'd be lying down, and the second I'd touch his tail, he'd turn his head to give me a 'look'. So, I'd take my hand away, return to rubbing his back or neck, and try again later. The phase lasted about a week. And then, he realised I wasn't going to pull his tail out or something, hehe, and fully relaxed.

When Pip was 6 MONTHS OLD I bought him a 'hutch' kinda cage, and put him outdoors.
And this is where the 'pros' began to turn into 'cons'.

Since work got a bit busy at that stage, I couldn't spend as much time with Pipi, and the 'lonliness' set in. I swear to God he felt ostracized by me back then. He'd claw the cage wanting out, staring at the screen door waiting for me to appear. On hearing my voice, he'd start 'cooing'...absolutely heartbreaking, I felt like guilty crap for it all. I'd have to go out, pick him up and calm him down like he was a toddler.

7 MONTHS OF AGE:
Got Pipi a mate, a female Tumbler named Lulu.
It took Pipi a month and half for Pipi to 'accept' her as a friend in his cage.

9 MONTHS OF AGE: The heartbreaking 'cooing' for me stopped. But our bond still continued on. He started thinking I was his girl at this point, and try 'mount' me. He got into this 'kissing' my fingers, hands and cheeks phase, that has kept up til today.
Lulu, his mate, developed a crush on Pipi yet got no response from Pipi.

ONE AND A HALF YEARS ON/NOW:
Pipi has now - finally -begun to court Lulu. So, the dude has a busy life. When I'm not around, he's chasing Lulu. And when I'm around, he's kissing, being cheeky with me.
Whilst we are in the sun, he'll flatten out on his favourite spot - my right chest - to catch the sun's rays. The little bugger thinks he's in heaven when he's been stroked and lying on me. He'll fan his tail and spread his wings, completely lose any sense of self control and become a pancake. He'll stare at me and nod, its very endearing and funny.

I still feed him, as his beak is criss-crossed and self feeding is hard for him.
I love him to bits. I never thought pigeons could have that much personilty or affection to give, but they do. :) Its a actual 'buddy'-ship we have going on.

So...my advice...unless you're willing and able to devote yourself wholeheartedly to your pigeon baby, I think Jay3 is right. The lonliness factor does kick in. One thing I learnt is, pigeons seriously have 'feelings'. They develop feelings and they have a memory that will astound you. Its a awesome experience.

Good luck!! :):)
 

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Discussion Starter · #12 ·
Okaies, sounds good. Heard bout the peanut treat but I nevered tried it. Now how effecient would you say it is? By the way, if a pair doesn't sit on their egg properly, as in near it but not nessarily sitting on it all the time, is that a bad sign?

I have a loft of rescues, and when they come here, most are not very trusting. I spend a lot of time with them and get to know each one, and their personality. No two are alike. Some are calm, while others are flighty and nervous in personality. They get used to me, as I am the feeder, the main cleaner of the loft, and the one who offers treats at the end of the day. Most pigeons love chopped unsalted peanuts. They don't even recognize them as food at first, so I mix them into their feed. Eventually they try them, and once they do, they love them. It's like they're addicting. LOL. After a while, they will fly to me for a treat. They get used to me being around a lot, and they learn that I'm not going to harm them. The thing is that you have to let them build trust in you, and that doesn't happen over night. Some will become friendly more quickly than others. You have to let them come to you in their time. You can't force it on them. That only scares them. They will see that the others come to you and are not harmed, and eventually, they will too. If some are too nervous or frightened to come to me, or take the treat out of my hand, that's okay. I just leave theirs in the box or on their perch where they can enjoy it. Patience is how you will win them over. But it is always on their terms, not on ours. You will learn to love and enjoy each one for their own personality. Just don't rush it, and except them the way they are. You will find that they will come to you when they are allowed to do that freely. It takes time, but so what? You have all the time in the world. Treats help a lot to break the ice.
 

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nice looking birds . one thing that you might want to do is trim their beaks . it's easy just take a pair of small finger nail clippers and trim the little hook on the top beak . it will make it easier for them to eat without the hook on the end of their beaks ... ps the hook will grow back. and it does not hurt them to trim as long as you don't go back to far . they are just like our fingernails .
 

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Okaies, sounds good. Heard bout the peanut treat but I nevered tried it. Now how effecient would you say it is? By the way, if a pair doesn't sit on their egg properly, as in near it but not nessarily sitting on it all the time, is that a bad sign?

They usually do that with the first egg, while waiting for the second one. After the second egg comes, then they sit on them.
 

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Discussion Starter · #17 ·
nice looking birds . one thing that you might want to do is trim their beaks . it's easy just take a pair of small finger nail clippers and trim the little hook on the top beak . it will make it easier for them to eat without the hook on the end of their beaks ... ps the hook will grow back. and it does not hurt them to trim as long as you don't go back to far . they are just like our fingernails .
Ok. thanks for the tip.
 

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Hey Jason, thanks :) Yeah, we've been cutting and filing Pip's beak from the start, just a tiny bit each time. It freaks us out we always come close to the vein, such a tiny beak and it doesn't take much to see a blood spot. Pip can't stand a newly cut and chiselled beak. It takes him a day and a half on average to get used to it, haha :).
 
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