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Discussion Starter · #1 · (Edited)
How can you get a ash red spread or lavender into your loft if you have ash red bar? What can I do to get lavender or ash red spread. I can not mix my breed with any other blood lines. So I have **** black spread which is very dark shiney black, silver bars, recessive red and ash red bar. I am having trouble introducing ash red spread or lavender in my loft. Any one who has clear though or can help?
 

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Discussion Starter · #2 · (Edited)
I am sorry, but I got lost.

1) So first pair is silver bar and ash red bar which will give me a ash red bar I assume. What would be the reason for this mutation?
2) The second pair is black with ash red bar. Wouldn't this will have me black?

3) Take the result of first pair (1) and pair it with result of second pair (2) which will be black spread?

Is this correct?

Why don't I delete step 1 and directly take the babies of step 2 and pair it to my ash red bar?
 

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Lavender is not dilute ash red it is ash red + spread. You can mate one of your ash bars to your homozygous blacks (spread). This will give you lavender young immediately. Of course dilute lavender is pretty too.......
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Blue + spread = black. Ash red + spread = "Lavender".

Black can be homozygous or heterozygous spread (one or two copies of the spread gene). Same with lavender.

For pattern it doesn't look like you have checks or t-patterns, just bar and spread in your group of birds. Your first sentence, first post says "How can you get a ash red into your lift if you have ash red bar?" I assume you meant lavender into your loft, since you already have ash red if you have an ash red bar.

Ash red is dominant over blue/black.........but those colors are also on the sex chromosomes. Therefore hens will be exactly what you see..........ash red or blue based. Cocks carry two sex chromosomes, so they can have two copies of ash red, two copies of blue or one of each.....one ash red and one blue. Cocks that have one copy of ash red and one copy of blue show blue (or black) flecking. Even lavenders split for blue will show flecks of black in the lavender.

Anyway, if you want to make lavenders with the birds you have you simply need to mate your ash red bars to your blacks. What sex are your blacks and ash reds? For example, A black (blue spread) homozygous for spread cock and ash red bar hen will give you lavender sons, and black daughters.
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
Yes, I meant to say lavender or ash red spread. My ash bar is male, but I have male and female **** black. So if I pair my male ash red bar with black hen I will have all black males and all females should be ash red bar, right?
 

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If you want lavender doesn't matter if you use checks or bars.

Now with the pairing you just mentioned (male ash red bar and black hen) should be all lavender young (the young cocks will be split for blue/black).
 

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If you want lavender doesn't matter if you use checks or bars.
Pattern does matter. Spread doesn't work all too good. On blues it generally does a good enough job however seeing 'black bar blacks' is not uncommon in flying breeds.
With Duns; the dilute blacks you're almost certain to know the pattern underneath as it bleeds.

With ash as a base it's even more important; with lavenders we want the light base color not the pattern color as we do with blues/blacks. So when you apply spread to ash (red) you are spreading the pigment or pattern color. With blues we get blacks like their bars. So with lavenders you want bars or even better barless. When you spread check or t-pattern you end up with 'mahogany'.
These vary just as ash reds vary already in tail markings. Some are dark ash with red necks almost looking like some weird combo of silver and recessive red. Others are rich red with ashy flights/tails.

When breeding lavenders expect them to vary in amount of lavenderness.
It's not difficult but not predictable like blues x spread.
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
I failed to get lavender past two years and this my hobby and that is not an option and therefore I need all the help I can get from you all. I have my basics in genetic now.

So if I pair my ash red bar male to a **** black female, I will get all ash red with males having black flacks and females dark ash red. Is this not true? Then I can take one of the hens and keep breeding it back to the ash red bar male till the black flakes and the red dies out. Please correct me if I am wrong.
 
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