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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Each year in the spring I find at least 3 robins each spring. the most I ever found in one spring was 7. There is no rehabilitation center near me. So there is two options one, leave the robin on the floor to die or try my best to save it. I am experienced in raising pigeons and doves from eggs but they are much different from robins because they eat bugs and pigeons do not. Each year the chicks always die. When it find them they look healthy and uninjured but after a few days there skin get wrinkled and they die. I want to finally know the right way to do it. I feed them bugs like worms and grass hoppers and keep them under a heat lamp. They live for a while and then die. I looked on Google and YouTube for how to care for a baby robin but the only care tips they give me are for fledglings. These are tiny baby’s. I know what human can’t do the same care as the mother but there has to be a way we can find a way to do this. If you know what I’m doing wrong or if you have any tips or anything please let me know because I don’t wanna have to spend another spring like this any info is greatly appreciated please get back to me when you can thanks. Here is pic of a baby I found last spring
Textile Toy Phasianidae Flooring Art
Textile Toy Phasianidae Flooring Art
 

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Discussion Starter · #2 ·
Each year in the spring I find at least 3 robins each spring. the most I ever found in one spring was 7. There is no rehabilitation center near me. So there is two options one, leave the robin on the floor to die or try my best to save it. I am experienced in raising pigeons and doves from eggs but they are much different from robins because they eat bugs and pigeons do not. Each year the chicks always die. When it find them they look healthy and uninjured but after a few days there skin get wrinkled and they die. I want to finally know the right way to do it. I feed them bugs like worms and grass hoppers and keep them under a heat lamp. They live for a while and then die. I looked on Google and YouTube for how to care for a baby robin but the only care tips they give me are for fledglings. These are tiny baby’s. I know what human can’t do the same care as the mother but there has to be a way we can find a way to do this. If you know what I’m doing wrong or if you have any tips or anything please let me know because I don’t wanna have to spend another spring like this any info is greatly appreciated please get back to me when you can thanks. Here is pic of a baby I found last spring View attachment 98784 View attachment 98784
And no he was not hurt he was eating fine legs look weird in the picture but they where fine he lived for three more days after this
 

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Would see if you can get avian baby food from a pet store r critical care for birds from a vet. They are powders that you put in liquid and feed with a syringe. Also you might want to try one week crickets. Which pet stores carry.
 

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I've come to the conclusion that raising any insect eating bird is much easier than pigeons and doves. Rather get a heatpad to keep them on. Sounds like they get dehydrated with the heatlamp. The best food to give to any insect eating bird, is soaked catpellets. Soak in warm water till soft. I use a small paintbrush to feed them. The tricky part is to get them to open the beak, but they quickly learn. I hold the paintbrush (with food on) against their beaks until a bit of liquid seeps in between the beak into their mouth. They usually get the idea then and will open their beaks. Put the paintbrush with food deep into their beaks so the food is at the back of the throat. When older, you can start including live mealworms and crickets for them to learn how to catch prey.

Also check their droppings. You need to see brown and white in the dropping.
Water Blue Organism Whiskers Underwater

Here's a photo of an African pipit I've raised recently. At the time I didn't had a clue what it was.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Thank you very much next season I will try this and one more question what kind of cat food and no bugs just the cat food?
 

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I use Montego Classic catpellets (chicken flavour). It's an average quality pellets. Don't know if you can get in your country. Any dry pellets will do, not the really cheap ones.

If they are dehydrated when you get them, first dip the brush in water and keep next to the beak away from the nostrils. I only start giving them water when a bit older, this they drank from the paintbrush.

I never fed them bugs. I just left some live mealworms in a bowl when they were older and this they ate by themselves.

Start a thread on here when you get babies.
 

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I've come to the conclusion that raising any insect eating bird is much easier than pigeons and doves. Rather get a heatpad to keep them on. Sounds like they get dehydrated with the heatlamp. The best food to give to any insect eating bird, is soaked catpellets. Soak in warm water till soft. I use a small paintbrush to feed them. The tricky part is to get them to open the beak, but they quickly learn. I hold the paintbrush (with food on) against their beaks until a bit of liquid seeps in between the beak into their mouth. They usually get the idea then and will open their beaks. Put the paintbrush with food deep into their beaks so the food is at the back of the throat. When older, you can start including live mealworms and crickets for them to learn how to catch prey.

Also check their droppings. You need to see brown and white in the dropping.
View attachment 98785
Here's a photo of an African pipit I've raised recently. At the time I didn't had a clue what it was.
Oh my goodness it’s so cute!!!
 

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Today is release day. He spend some time free flying yesterday around our house (cats locked away) and has been very good at catching insects. So I'm taking him to a nice spot a km away from our house. Off course I will go check on him regularly.
 
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