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Discussion Starter #1
how do you trap train rollers or any kind of pigeon cause i try to teach mine but they dont learn how do you do it. steps please need serious help since i dont want them out all day.
 

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I think there is a sticky post here somewhere.

Generally speaking, its best if you train them to respond to a call (shake a can, whistle, bell, etc.).

Don't leave food out all the time. You want to condition your birds to a feeding schedule and a feeding location.

Put your birds in a traveling cage just outside the trap. Leave the trap open, shake your feed can and open your traveling cage so the birds will have to walk through the open trap to get to the food. Repeat this for several days until your birds are moving through the opened trap smoothly.

Next, do the same thing with the traveling cage, only this time you want to put your trap in place (bobs, drop, etc.). Shake your can and the birds ought to be so used to having to leave the traveling cage and walk through the trap area that they'll do it with ease.
 

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Discussion Starter #3
thanks and should i leave them there to trap train the whole day or how long should i leave them out there?
 

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You dont need to leave them in the travel cage very long.

If the birds are hungry and conditioned to eat at a certain time on cue (shake can, ring bell, etc.) then it shouldn't take very long for them to leave the travel cage and enter the loft.
 

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I wrote this for homers, but it works for other breeds as well, except for the distance training.
This is from my website at:
http://kjcii.webs.com/trainingtips.htm
For the first week you have the young homers every time you feed them make a consistent noise. You can whistle, shake a can of feed or say anything you want as long as it stays the same. They will associate the sound with being fed and this will be your feed call.

The second week place a cage on the outside on your landing board, so that the pigeons can only enter the loft, not fly away. Put the pigeons in the cage wait a couple of minutes for them to settle down and then do the feed call and feed them. They will try to get in to get the feed and thus learn how to trap into the loft. Do this every day.

The third week, if all is going well, skip their feed for a day, but give them water and an hour before dark put them on the board. Slowly remove the cage, so that you do not startle them, enter the loft, do the feed call and feed them. They should immediately enter. If they do not they should still try to get back in to sleep in the loft.

Do this every other day, but give them half of what they will eat in the morning and the rest when they enter during the training in the evening.

The fourth week if all is going well, skip there feed and in the evening put them on the board remove the cage and stand back and watch them for half an hour before calling them in. They may enter right away at first, but eventually they will start circling around and landing on higher perches.

Always make sure they are slightly hungry when you fly them and that they have food waiting for them in the loft.

Once they start routing, flying in big circles out of sight, put them in the cage you will release them from and let them go in several different places in your yard. This acclimates them to being in the cage.

If this is going well start releasing them at about 1 mile away from all different directions.

Slowly increase the distance you release them at until you have them trained out the distance you want them to fly.





Please feel free to ask if you have any questions.



Keith Caserta

Dayton, Ohio 45410

(937)570-6088
 

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Discussion Starter #6
man that info is good stuff i will definitely try it out thanks for help both of you. just curious if you would take a roller and take him out a 2 blocks i know he will come back but if you keep increasing the distance will he still come back or is there a limit until he gets lost. like if you would try to train him like a homer. just a thought.
 

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Some rollers probably have a decent amount of homing ability; the problem is that trying to find that distance you are likely to lose that bird.
Since they aren't bred for distance it's unlikely to be anywhere close to the distance a good racing homer will return from.
Rollers are much slower than homers in the air. Rolling expends a lot of energy and rollers are easy targets for hawks when flying and especially after coming out of a roll
If you want to fly your birds long distances I recommend getting some racing homers.
 

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Discussion Starter #8
yea i might try to get some homers for fun wanna witness their homing ability cause its sounds cool
 
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