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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
So I've been keeping pigeons for almost 2 years now and am still going strong, getting more and more birds. I recently visited a small town in Mexico close to Guadalajara where no one keeps pigeons even though I know many would really like them. I was telling them about my birds back home and pretty much all of them are familiar with homing pigeons, that is to say they know that some pigeons are good at homing from some distance, but they've never heard of racing pigeons or that people even race pigeons at all. Probably because this is a small town where everyone knows everybody and there is no access to the internet there, one must hitch a ride on the bus to the nearest town 20 minutes away(though there should be access soon). They've also never heard of all the fancy breeds we have or performers like the rollers and highflyers and such. I would like nothing more than to introduce birds there, I could bring some white racers, damscenes, rollers, and indian fantails, all of which would be very popular. I just have no idea how to go about transporting them legally. I believe a few of the big name racing pigeons breeders, such as the Ganus', export birds to mexico since there is a pretty extensive racing pigeon community down there after doing some research online and looking for breeders down there. It truly is a worldwide sport. I believe I could easily find racing pigeons down there in a city and bring them to the village, but I couldn't find any breeders of rollers and fancies, which is why I'm contemplating exporting, or exporting/importing, if I have to receive them on the other side.

Now, having said that, this leads me to another question. What is the minimum number of foundation breeders one can reasonably start with in order to establish a populating without having to deal with the drawbacks of inbreeding? In other words what is the minimum number of birds and bloodlines you need to have a population grow and grow.

Thanks for your time.

Ramiro Rodriguez
 

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Gosh Ramero...given the amount of time it would take to get the pigeons to the village and taking into account the heat and all...it just doesn't sound like a very good idea to me.
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
Gosh Ramero...given the amount of time it would take to get the pigeons to the village and taking into account the heat and all...it just doesn't sound like a very good idea to me.
I don't see what the big deal is, when I've gone there from my home (all the way in Boston, MA) it takes about 12 hours, usually less depending on how much time I have to wait between flights. Pigeons spend more time than that in a small box when they're being shipped overnight.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Very informative, thank you! Hopefully I don't have to go through all that paperwork, since I'm not exporting expensive parrots that are listed under CITES nor will I be bringing them back, they're just pigeons :).
 

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Hi RAMIRO, The first thing you better do is find out what the MEXICAN LAWS are. If you don't you just might find a customs agent waiting for you at the airport in Mexico,and that could be a lot of trouble for you.It is very supprising to me that you would take a chance of getting in trouble. I know a young man that lives in Escondido, CA. that has sent birds to a big one loft race in Guadalajara his family lives in the city and from what I am told there is a big racing club or clubs in that city.GEORGE;)
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
Who said I was going to take a chance? I'm asking for help so I can do everything right and have all the necessary paperwork. I believe there are some well-known pigeon breeders who offer their pigeons for sale in other countries, most of them are into racing pigeons. I'll ask them for info on how they get their birds into mexico.
 

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Ramiro, it appears you are doing it the 'right way". Looking for information before taking the action. If you have access to those other breeders, that sounds like a good start. You might also do some on-line searching, as well as call the US and Mexican Embassies and Border Patrols to ask for their input. You may need to speak to several people/places before you get all the information you need.

You also need to think about the birds' well being. If the village is so remote (even if it's not) ... where/how will food and healthcare be acquired for them? Who will teach the people and who will be readily available to help them care for the birds? Who will help them build lofts? Where will those supplies come from? Do the villagers have clean water - enough to spare for the birds? You might want to speak with organizations like the PeaceCorp and Heiffer Project to find out what, how, and where they do what they do. Maybe your project could help them expand services which they already have in place. Your ideas sound commendable but the project does need to be more than just sending birds....
 

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I don't see what the big deal is, when I've gone there from my home (all the way in Boston, MA) it takes about 12 hours, usually less depending on how much time I have to wait between flights. Pigeons spend more time than that in a small box when they're being shipped overnight.
Everyone has given you excellent advise. I don't know that the birds would be placed on the same flight as yourself. A trip that takes you 12 hours, could take them 2 days, 3 days, 4 days or more. In the heat, it's doubtful they would survive.:mad::(
The concerns Wolfwood expressed shadow my own concerns perfectly.
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
Ramiro, it appears you are doing it the 'right way". Looking for information before taking the action. If you have access to those other breeders, that sounds like a good start. You might also do some on-line searching, as well as call the US and Mexican Embassies and Border Patrols to ask for their input. You may need to speak to several people/places before you get all the information you need.

You also need to think about the birds' well being. If the village is so remote (even if it's not) ... where/how will food and healthcare be acquired for them? Who will teach the people and who will be readily available to help them care for the birds? Who will help them build lofts? Where will those supplies come from? Do the villagers have clean water - enough to spare for the birds? You might want to speak with organizations like the PeaceCorp and Heiffer Project to find out what, how, and where they do what they do. Maybe your project could help them expand services which they already have in place. Your ideas sound commendable but the project does need to be more than just sending birds....
Sorry if I made the village seem remote but it's not. They have all the amenities we have, clean running water, bathrooms, etc. Due to the terrain telephone wires are a hassle to install therefore no one has internet access there, but they do have a access to phones and of course some people have cell phones. I'm sure they must have access to vets seeing how they keep all sorts of animals, chickens, cows, pigs, etc...
 

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To add,

"Jose does not fly himself, but he does ship pigeons to the races in Mexico.For those of you that don't know anything about Mexico, you might not be that impressed, but did you know that that Guadalajara has approximately 600 lofts in a very small area, and that it is common for them to ship 20,000 pigeons a race? " http://www.ehoremans.com/
 
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