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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
A lot of you guys on this forum have already been through this kind of thing, being older than me, so I'm looking for a bit of advice.

I'm about half way through college, and so far I've been able to scrape by paying directly out of my pocket and living at home with my parents.
Now I'm transferring from community college to the 4-year university, which will cost quite a bit more.

I'm going to try and get more employment--my two part time jobs just can't give me the hours to cover this.

Dad won't cosign on a loan, I don't have credit, and he won't fill out the FAFSA, so I can't get a government student loan or apply for any of the better scholarships or get a private loan. I will do what I can with my GPA of 3.39 to get academic scholarships.

At the same time, I'm trying to replace my car which just went to the junk yard.

Does anyone here know more ways to raise the money, or some good scholarships out there, without filling out a FAFSA or having a cosigner?

I know this is kind of random, but I'm just about out of ideas.

Oh, and I'm a biology major, if that detail is needed.
 

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I wish I can give you pointers, but in the past tuition fees are lower and government helps more. Now the tuition fees costs more and there is less government help. I don't know how students do it now. The gas prices were cheaper, too, back then.

In the past I bought used textbooks instead of buying new. That saved me usually 30-50% off. Because I know how to fix my own car that saves, too.

Have you investigated government educational grants? It is hard to get scholarship even with 3.5 GPA. I was even on a Dean's List and was still difficult.
 

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Libis, what do you plan to do with your biology degree? If you were thinking about nursing, many hospitals offer programs where they will help pay for nursing degrees if you promise to work for them x number of years. You would need to be employed by them and I know of many secretaries and nsg techs who do this.
I kind of understand where you are as my last child is in her last semester of college and we are paying as we go. It is terribly expensive and fafsa does help. I would speak to your advisor at school and they can direct you to the right resources. I wonder if you could file for fafsa on your own? My husband takes care of all of that so I don't really understand how it works.
Rodsd is right about the second hand books. I know some parents have a problem with paying for their children's education, either unable to afford it or feel the child will appreciate it more if it comes out of their own pocket. He may have paid for his own education and it worked for him so why not you? The problem with that thinking is that, economically, things have changed tremendously! I paid for my own back in the day, and while difficult, well worth it and no big deal. Your father may be of the same generation.
 

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Go to the financial aid office of the university where you wish to transfer and talk to them about your situation and all the options. Believe me...there are many option, so don't feel stuck.
You can apply for a FAFSA pin number, which you will need, to apply for aid. You can apply ...your dad doesn't need to although you will be asked your parent's income. Likely you will get some free money and the option of low interest student loans. Most loans don't require payments until six months after graduation or six months adfter you stop going to college. The time to check into this is ASAP because the money goes quickly.
 

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Go to the financial aid office of the university where you wish to transfer and talk to them about your situation and all the options. Believe me...there are many option, so don't feel stuck.
You can apply for a FAFSA pin number, which you will need, to apply for aid. You can apply ...your dad doesn't need to although you will be asked your parent's income. Likely you will get some free money and the option of low interest student loans. Most loans don't require payments until six months after graduation or six months after you stop going to college. The time to check into this is ASAP because the money goes quickly.
Excellent advice. The only reason your dad has to be involved in the FAFSA, is if he is claiming you as a dependent. Best option is to get grants...they don't have to be paid back. :D
 

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Stay away from credit cards! Major common college mistake. Find a place nearby school and forget the car, use public transport you will save a ton of money. Find work in restraunts, this will help you bring home the needed cash. Buy all the books you can used. Often times you can get a job at the school(in library, financial aid office...)and that will allow you to work around your class schedule during the days. Best of luck
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
Thank you so much for all of your thoughts. :)

Libis, what do you plan to do with your biology degree? If you were thinking about nursing, many hospitals offer programs where they will help pay for nursing degrees if you promise to work for them x number of years. You would need to be employed by them and I know of many secretaries and nsg techs who do this.
Nope, I really want to work with animals. Unfortunately, the most fun job I have been able to try out in internship form (zoo keeper) doesn't really pay anything--but I might just do it anyway for a while once I graduate. (Any more, all of the keepers have degrees.) If I further my education beyond a bachelor's I might work towards being a vet or reproductive physiologist.
I kind of understand where you are as my last child is in her last semester of college and we are paying as we go. It is terribly expensive and fafsa does help. I would speak to your advisor at school and they can direct you to the right resources. I wonder if you could file for fafsa on your own? My husband takes care of all of that so I don't really understand how it works.
Because I am filed in his tax stuff as a dependent, I need his financial info to file. He refuses, so I cannot finish the process. He keeps everything about his finances very secret--even mom cannot guess numbers that would be anywhere near accurate enough to put in there.
Rodsd is right about the second hand books. I know some parents have a problem with paying for their children's education, either unable to afford it or feel the child will appreciate it more if it comes out of their own pocket. He may have paid for his own education and it worked for him so why not you? The problem with that thinking is that, economically, things have changed tremendously! I paid for my own back in the day, and while difficult, well worth it and no big deal. Your father may be of the same generation.
As far as books go, whenever possible I buy online. This is a good reminder, though to sell a few of them off again. :)
Yeah, I'm paying for everything except 3-6 thousand, if he decides not to use it before. We're not poor, he just wants to hang onto his cash.

Go to the financial aid office of the university where you wish to transfer and talk to them about your situation and all the options. Believe me...there are many option, so don't feel stuck.
You can apply for a FAFSA pin number, which you will need, to apply for aid. You can apply ...your dad doesn't need to although you will be asked your parent's income. Likely you will get some free money and the option of low interest student loans. Most loans don't require payments until six months after graduation or six months adfter you stop going to college. The time to check into this is ASAP because the money goes quickly.
What kind of loans can I get without filling out the fafsa and without a cosigner and without any credit? I would think that the interest would be very high, considering the risk that the bank would have to take in trusting me. I will talk to someone once all of these finals are done. February is my last month of community college.

Excellent advice. The only reason your dad has to be involved in the FAFSA, is if he is claiming you as a dependent. Best option is to get grants...they don't have to be paid back. :D
I will have to look into some grants and see if I qualify.

Stay away from credit cards! Major common college mistake. Find a place nearby school and forget the car, use public transport you will save a ton of money. Find work in restraunts, this will help you bring home the needed cash. Buy all the books you can used. Often times you can get a job at the school(in library, financial aid office...)and that will allow you to work around your class schedule during the days. Best of luck
Our public transport is not good. They lie about where the stops are--they've told us before that ones that do exist didn't and vice-versa. Also, they only run once or twice a day and I really need a car to get to both my jobs. (One job is a rather great distance and in a rich neighborhood where no buses run because I would be the only one using them lol.)
I don't want a third job. I will probably look to replace one of my two part times with a full time over the summer.
 

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Because I am filed in his tax stuff as a dependent, I need his financial info to file. He refuses, so I cannot finish the process. He keeps everything about his finances very secret--even mom cannot guess numbers that would be anywhere near accurate enough to put in there.
How old are you? How much support are your parents actually providing? If you file your own tax return, they will not be able to claim you, and you can then file your own FAFSA. It would probably benefit you to do it with your own lower income than with your parents' higher income. Seems to me that your father is being quite selfish...using you as a tax deduction but not providing you with what is necessary to further your education.
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 · (Edited)
How old are you? How much support are your parents actually providing? If you file your own tax return, they will not be able to claim you, and you can then file your own FAFSA. It would probably benefit you to do it with your own lower income than with your parents' higher income. Seems to me that your father is being quite selfish...using you as a tax deduction but not providing you with what is necessary to further your education.
I'm 20, and still live at home--no rent to pay, still on dad's health insurance, eat at least half of my food at home. The last time I met with my adviser a couple of weeks ago he said that I could not file my own individual FAFSA while living with my parents till 25. By that time I plan to be done with college and perhaps married to my sweetheart (we've been together since 2006.) If they take even as little as half of my credits from the community college I should be done in 3 years or fewer.
Anyways, the FAFSA site insists on his info once I've gotten far enough into the app for it to determine that I'm a dependent. If I could afford to move out I could file my own separate. However even with both my jobs I might have to try to find a loan for school, or go do telemarketing full time and keep one of my current jobs--I was just barely able to pay for community college. There's no way I could pay rent, birdseed, and feed myself, while paying tuition.
Dad isn't as logical or as nice as he would like the world to believe. He also says that all this no cosigning stuff is because he is afraid that he will lose his vision and be out of work in 5-10 years and be out of work--and does not want to risk having to pay the loan back. I don't think this is true, because he is not only selfish with money, but also weirdly territorial over food and the like.
 

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I worked in the Admission Office for a private university and understand how challenging it is to fund your educaiton. Here are a few things to consider:
1) you may not like the idea, but dump the car (along with the insurance, tags, maintenance and gas costs) and get a bike or moped. It's just for a couple of years and the money you save adds up fast.

2) Ask your financial aid office about filing for emancipation from you parents. This would allow you to file for FAFSA on your own.

3) Check with your Comm. College if they have scholarships for graduates going on to 4 year university.

4) Look at scholarships for particular professions. Often times, companies and industries (ie nursing) will offer college assistance funds if you commit to working in that industry or with a particular company (usually about a 3 year committment).

5) If necessary, consider putting your education on pause for a semester or two while you work full time with a company that offers tuition reimbursment (most companys you will need to work for a few months up to a year before these benefits apply). Contact as many veternarian clinics/hospitals as possible with a proposal to "volunteer" for an agreed upon time at no charge to the vet if they will pay for your tuition. This will require you to put a resume and proposal (ie cost benifit to them how much is your volunteer time worth over that period of time versus the cost of tuition).

6) Take a job (full time) with the university you wish to attend. With most universities, full time employees get 2 free classes per semester. It will take longer but it's free. Confirm the requirements of this benifit as it varies from school to school.

7) There are different types of loans. 1. Need based (determined by FAFSA) Of the Need Based Loans, there are subsidized (low interest not accruing interest charges while a full time student) and unsubsidized (higher interest rates and interest accrues while you are still in school) in either case you do not have to start repaying these until 6 months after graduating. need based loans. 2.Educational (commercial, independent, goes by many names). These are more like a car loan. Once you take out this loan you will need to start making monthly payments or request to defer the repayment (fees and accruing interest charges will apply). You could be eligable for educational loans without your parents cosigning. You would not need to file a FAFSA for Education loans. Contact your Financial Aid Office for help in applying.

Don't be afraid of loans, it's the best way for a young person to develope credit. By paying them back you will have better credit than a friend who did not take out and pay back student loans.

8)There are scholarships/grants that the Financial Aid Office has info on also that will be different from the ones available at your Comm. College, so talk to both schools' offices.

9) Keep in mind that in most cases all scholarships or grants come with "strings attached". Make sure you read the details. Also, if you recieve a scholarship for 2 years, ask is the award increases with the increase in tuition (tuition increases by an average of 10% every year at every university).

10) I'm sure you have already thought of this, but make sure you sign up for an early orientation so you get the classes you want first and hit bookstore first. The earlier you get your class schedule, the earlier you buy your books. The used books go first and they are much cheaper than the new ones. Never buy new books if possible. You might even find a lot of the books on ebay or amazon cheaper so check that out. Books run an average of $1000 per year and buying used books can cut this in half.

11) When looking for employment, try to get a job in the university's book store. The hours are better for a student needing their days free, and usually bookstore employees get a discount on purchases such as books. Double check with you school as this varies from school to school.

12) Find out exactly how many hours total must be completed at your 4 year university AND how many of those have to be the final ones in consecutive order. For example: 48 total hours must be taken an Univ. XYZ and of those 48 the final 27 hours must be taken in consecutive order. Why? Even though you may have completed the classes necessary to finish your Assoc. Degree at a comm. college, you may still have core classes or pre rec classes within you major that you can pick up in a summer session or evening class at the comm. college (same required class, much cheaper).

13) Even if you do not file a FAFSA, still fill out every application for scholarship or grants (even if they require a FAFSA). Make a case for hardship in your applicaiton to justify your application. A factually documented financial circumstance of hardship, not a sad story (sorry but these people are not moved by a sad story, they see too many true and not so true ones to give any of them merit). Be possible, ambitious, humble and responsible

From here it gets into advice based upon your specific situation and I do not have enough info to advise you. Good luck!
 

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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
Kiko&Kalani--Thank you for your detailed response, I'll look into all of that.

As far as the car goes, it is a must with our winters. I have already frozen my toes before and do not want to do it again. We have subzero temperatures off and on through the winter along with very deep snow. Also, I've tried biking on ice before and couldn't keep from falling in the street.
 

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This reply might be outdated since this is 3 months after you first posted. Nevertheless...

When I was a starving student, I teamed up with other starving students in my class/area. I didn't have a car then, and after paying tuition usually don't have money to pay for books. So we carpooled to campus, and split the cost of one textbook (among 4 people). Significantly reducing the textbook costs, especially if it was secondhand. We rotate the book each week, the person with the book that week is responsible for making notes out of the book and pass it along to the other 3. It lighten study load a bit, if you consider one full time term is 4 subjects. We also did the same with books from the library, as in rotating the borrowing. One person will return it, to be promptly borrowed by another etc.

A lot of your classmates will be in the same boat so it'll be worth it to team up and make life easier for everyone. :) I studied business so a lot of our textbooks are generic anyway, not sure if this would work for your field but won't hurt to try. Good luck!
 

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Discussion Starter · #13 ·
This reply might be outdated since this is 3 months after you first posted. Nevertheless...

When I was a starving student, I teamed up with other starving students in my class/area. I didn't have a car then, and after paying tuition usually don't have money to pay for books. So we carpooled to campus, and split the cost of one textbook (among 4 people). Significantly reducing the textbook costs, especially if it was secondhand. We rotate the book each week, the person with the book that week is responsible for making notes out of the book and pass it along to the other 3. It lighten study load a bit, if you consider one full time term is 4 subjects. We also did the same with books from the library, as in rotating the borrowing. One person will return it, to be promptly borrowed by another etc.

A lot of your classmates will be in the same boat so it'll be worth it to team up and make life easier for everyone. :) I studied business so a lot of our textbooks are generic anyway, not sure if this would work for your field but won't hurt to try. Good luck!
Naah, it's not outdated, I've still got another couple of years of college to go.
The book rotation could work well if I can find some other biology majors. That might be easier that what I have been doing where if I can mostly get away with it I just don't buy the book and read up on the subject online. :)

I really wanted to carpool with my boyfriend and a few other friends, but none of them go to night classes like I do. (So I can get the most possible hours of work.)
 

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The only reason I haven't done the FAFSA is because I keep forgetting to finish it and it only lasts for 40 days :rolleyes: I don't understand why your dad won't help. You need money to go to school, and to get money, they need information. Does he realize he could be keeping you from finishing school?

I'll have to be dealing with all this crap this fall. I'm going to try to find a full time job over the summer and save all the money I can for college. I'm going to a community college for my first two years like you did. I'm supposed to be getting some kind of award or something tomorrow at the banquet. My FFA teacher won't tell me what it is, but he said it would be helpful. Hopefully it's money!

I would look for some scholarships and such for people already in college. I know there's one from the IF. So perfect opportunity for pigeon people :) I plan on entering it next year.
 

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Discussion Starter · #15 ·
Well, he did finally fill it out about 3 hours before the scholarship apps were due. It was too late to make decent applications (tried anyway.)

I'm trying to work as much as possible too. The trouble is, nobody wants to give people hours right now.

What's the IF? I'm still kind of new to this part of the bird hobby.
 

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Ah, nevermind. I forgot you only had doves (how on earth did that slip my mind?). The IF is the International Federation of Homing Pigeon Fanciers...Inc. Super long name :p It's one of the two main racing pigeon organizations in the US. They have a scholarship where you write an essay revolving around your experiences with pigeons and such. I also forgot you or someone in your family has to have been a member of the IF for a few years. Guess I was caught up in the whole scholarship talk to realize that doesn't apply :eek: It doesn't even apply to me yet, since I've only been a member for 3 years. I think it has to be 5.
 

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Discussion Starter · #17 ·
Ah, nevermind. I forgot you only had doves (how on earth did that slip my mind?). The IF is the International Federation of Homing Pigeon Fanciers...Inc. Super long name :p It's one of the two main racing pigeon organizations in the US. They have a scholarship where you write an essay revolving around your experiences with pigeons and such. I also forgot you or someone in your family has to have been a member of the IF for a few years. Guess I was caught up in the whole scholarship talk to realize that doesn't apply :eek: It doesn't even apply to me yet, since I've only been a member for 3 years. I think it has to be 5.
lol, that's ok. If boyfriend puts up with it in the future, I'll probably eventually have pigeons. :) I just don't have money to build a loft or anywhere to put one yet though.
 

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MoE/Libis,

I'm going to be the "ugly father" type for a minute so please forgive me.

As a parent looking at two teenagers about to enter "the real world" that I have inhabited for many years now, I am not sure that parents should help their kids with college. There are a couple of technical reasons, some of Libis' dad's points for example, but primarily it comes down to responsibility and ownership. I'll use an example from my life and hope it translates.

When I was a kid I never saw the problem with running over a pot hole or curb in dad's car. Now that I am the one paying for repairs, I understand my dad's yelling about the alignment, tires, and suspension. By facing the cost of auto repair I valued the good driving habits that I should have had as a teenager/young adult. Fast forward to college and I didn't see the value. So I wasted dad's money, dropped out of school and left him with a pile of debts that I couldn't pay. Since he co-signed he got the ding on his credit rating.

Now that I am parent I wish I had that degree. Mind you I managed to be very successful in a professional field (I am a manager of an IT group in a fortune 500 company) but it was hard. You don't need a degree to succeed, you need to work hard. Which is why I am not willing to provide financial assistance for college. If my kids want to spend $30K for a degree (that is the cost of a BS at the local community college) I will encourage them to work hard and do it. Part of that work is finding the money and paying their debts. Given the state of the economy that last part should be foremost in their minds. How are they going to pay their debts?

And before we bring up "degreed workers make more then non degreed" I would point out that this is simply not true. In my field 50% of the folks working at my level don't have a degree. The degreed folks are a dime a dozen and mostly cookie cutter copies of each other. Persons working in a trade profession (electrician, carpenter, cosmetology, etc) typically get trained through apprenticeships and have a higher life time earning than a person with BS/MA in IT, business, management account, etc.

For me (maybe not for your parents) I would rather have my kids work for what they think is important. I would rather give them a down payment on a house, a new car, or vacations for their spouse and kids than have them not understand the value of the education that a college can provide.

Libis, after reading this whole thread for several days, I sincerely hope that your dad's motives are more along my line of thought than it appears. If he truly is that secretive you might want to consider emancipation as all he is doing is profiting from your deduction (I intend to stop claiming my kids in their senior year of HS to give them the ability to say "I am not that idiots deduction") and hindering your ability to make use of available resources. You may want to think about the possibility that living at home isn't the best option for you.

If folks really want to flame me, please keep it civil or do it via PM. Passion is no excuse for incivility.
 

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Discussion Starter · #19 · (Edited)
MoE/Libis,

I'm going to be the "ugly father" type for a minute so please forgive me.

As a parent looking at two teenagers about to enter "the real world" that I have inhabited for many years now, I am not sure that parents should help their kids with college. There are a couple of technical reasons, some of Libis' dad's points for example, but primarily it comes down to responsibility and ownership. I'll use an example from my life and hope it translates.

When I was a kid I never saw the problem with running over a pot hole or curb in dad's car. Now that I am the one paying for repairs, I understand my dad's yelling about the alignment, tires, and suspension. By facing the cost of auto repair I valued the good driving habits that I should have had as a teenager/young adult. Fast forward to college and I didn't see the value. So I wasted dad's money, dropped out of school and left him with a pile of debts that I couldn't pay. Since he co-signed he got the ding on his credit rating.

Now that I am parent I wish I had that degree. Mind you I managed to be very successful in a professional field (I am a manager of an IT group in a fortune 500 company) but it was hard. You don't need a degree to succeed, you need to work hard. Which is why I am not willing to provide financial assistance for college. If my kids want to spend $30K for a degree (that is the cost of a BS at the local community college) I will encourage them to work hard and do it. Part of that work is finding the money and paying their debts. Given the state of the economy that last part should be foremost in their minds. How are they going to pay their debts?

And before we bring up "degreed workers make more then non degreed" I would point out that this is simply not true. In my field 50% of the folks working at my level don't have a degree. The degreed folks are a dime a dozen and mostly cookie cutter copies of each other. Persons working in a trade profession (electrician, carpenter, cosmetology, etc) typically get trained through apprenticeships and have a higher life time earning than a person with BS/MA in IT, business, management account, etc.

For me (maybe not for your parents) I would rather have my kids work for what they think is important. I would rather give them a down payment on a house, a new car, or vacations for their spouse and kids than have them not understand the value of the education that a college can provide.

Libis, after reading this whole thread for several days, I sincerely hope that your dad's motives are more along my line of thought than it appears. If he truly is that secretive you might want to consider emancipation as all he is doing is profiting from your deduction (I intend to stop claiming my kids in their senior year of HS to give them the ability to say "I am not that idiots deduction") and hindering your ability to make use of available resources. You may want to think about the possibility that living at home isn't the best option for you.

If folks really want to flame me, please keep it civil or do it via PM. Passion is no excuse for incivility.
Not flaming you, just setting the scene that this is all going on within:

I've paid for 95% of my college straight out of my pocket so far. I have a 3.3 gpa. Not perfect, but I work hard. I own my car and am making payments on it as quickly as possible to finish paying it off. I pay my own insurance, maintenance, repairs, gasoline. I buy everything I need. I've been buying all of my own clothing and prescriptions since I was sixteen. All my own gas since I was seventeen or eighteen when I stopped driving my siblings to school for my parents. I rarely even eat at home. I'm working two jobs, but it still isn't enough--I'm looking at a third. I also volunteer intern at the zoo every Saturday in hopes of securing a job there, because they would give me a lot of hours and it is work that I enjoy.

I just completed my associate's degree, but it's really just generals, so a lot of work places won't look twice at it.

All I want is to finish college so I can get a full time job and marry my sweetheart who I've been with since 2006.

As far as dad and his behavior goes, the whole family has its problems with him. He's... passive aggressive with paranoid issues. I try not to be around home when he isn't distracted with the computer, because it's not worth being around for all of the pointless fights that he starts with people. I feel badly for mom, she has to deal with him all of the time.

In March, I needed dad to fill out the parental part of the FAFSA so that I could apply for scholarships. Without these scholarships, it will be more difficult to pay for school. He didn't want to fill it out, though there was no monetary risk to him and all that it functions for is to decide if I can get grants and helps them pick who gets certain scholarships. He finally filled it out a couple of hours before the scholarship apps were due, at mom's pleading.

He also would not give a straight answer about it or any of the other things that were a problem that month. He wanted me to shop for my own car myself, but when I did he was angrythat I didn't let him go pick out a car for me. I still went on my own and got the most efficient and best quality (longest lasting) car I could find--a little ten year old Acura. I even managed to convince my bank to give me a loan without a cosigner or any credit. (With a ridiculous rate, but I understand why they don't trust me enough to give me a good rate.) (It did help that mom got dad to let me have the money from what was left of my old school car.) My brother and I have been doing the maintenance ourselves by our own hands. Little brother is teaching me to do it all myself. Dad sulked for weeks after I bought my car on my own--exactly what he had insisted that I do.

With dad it's damned if I do, damned if I don't. That's how it goes, because his moods and whims and attitudes change like a storm. It's even worse for my brother, even though he works his butt off.

Jaysen, I do understand where you're coming from.
It sounds like you truly care about your children and their maturity as they go out into the world. I know many people who are older than I am who still do not understand how to work or even make it anywhere on time.

Unfortunately, my problems here are those that come with having a mentally unstable family member at the reins and causing problems for the entire lot of us.
 

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I don't expect my parents to help me at all as far as money out of their pockets. However, I do expect them to fill out what needs to be provided by them when it comes to scholarships, student aid, etc. Or at least give me their info so I can write it in for them. I agree that we should have to work for it rather than being handed it. Of course, that was never a choice for me anyway. My mom's been disabled most of my life so my dad has always had a hard time keeping all the medical bills paid, the house payments, etc. by himself. Long story short, I've always been aware of the money situation and I've never taken advantage of my parents' money. I have to beg my dad to use my money to get gas, use as my lunch money for school, or feed MY birds :rolleyes: Or any other time he needs it. He's really stubborn and doesn't ask for help unless he severely needs it. :p
I always wonder how some of my friends can possibly think, "Well, I'm not paying for it so it doesn't matter. It's my parent's money." Well, if you live with your parents, it does matter because their money is also the money that keeps you up :rolleyes: But that's a rant for another day, LOL.



And Libis, I'm sorry about your situation with your dad! Sounds like it'd be really tough to handle sometimes :(
 
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