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ON what floor, the loft, house floor? once the babies are strong enough to fly, they will try to fly down...But if you're asking how old will they be for their wings to be strong enough to fly up and down? I say around a month or month and a ½...
 

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Well to be honest with you, at one month of age even a little older less than 2 months they are not safe to be on the floor unless you have a separate section only for YB's so no OB's will bully them...Yes you can put them on the floor and watch them walk around and wander around this way their legs will be strong enough to walk a bit more than their nestbox and put them back...If you have a YB section then you don't have to worry about anything, most of them will still be squeeking and trying to run or dock from you if you get closer...
 

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Some of my babies will go down the floor at 3 weeks old which endangers their life because I have bully birds that will scalped them. I usually put them back in the nest box. If you don't have bully birds, then it will probably be ok. I think it is better if you just let them go to the floor during weaning time which is usually around 4 weeks old.
 

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I have started removing the babies from the nest and putting them on the floor of the loft at about 21 days or so, maybe a bit earlier if they are developing well. They have a little corner of the loft that I call the "nursery". All the cocks feed all the youngsters, regardless of whether they are theirs or not. An added plus is that they have access to the feed trough, waterer and grit containers just like their parents. They seem to start eating on their own quicker and it makes weening go much easier.

I started doing this because I had hens that would lay their second round in the same bowl with the babies in it. They would do this even though they had an empty bowl for the second round. I lost some eggs because of this so I decided to move the youngsters to the floor. Works out great! I haven't had any instances of fighting or scalping of the babies either.

Just the way I am doing things. Not saying it is right, just right for me.

Dan
 

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If you have an area specially set aside for the young ones (like an old play pen, where older birds can't get into) you can put them there at around 20 to 30 days of age, depending on when they start walking, but only for an hour at a time. You can increase the time as they get older.

I usually give them deep spill proof bowls of seed and a water bowl, which they usually start bathing in. They love it and they learn from watching each other too! :p
 

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In my loft/situation, it just depends. If you've only got one or two babies.......putting them in the floor is just asking for trouble. In previous years, I would always have about 8 pair of breeders in my breeder loft, which in turn, meant I had a dozen or more babies that I could put in the floor. What I do, and it's a bit more work for me, but I have time, is feed in the morning, put the babies in the floor around 10:00 or so and leave them until about 5:00 and pick them all up and put them back in their boxes. I don't have a corner for them to hide in, but I do put a big pile of pine needles in one corner for them to lay on. I've never had a baby scalped, but I do keep an eye on them during the day. I can walk out the back door and if I hear a baby screaming, I go check. It' usually just the cocks feeding a few and they're flapping thier wings and chasing someone to feed them.
Normally, around 18 days old is when I start doing this.
Now, this past year, I only had 5 pairs of breeders in the loft and all the babies were different ages, and I didn't put any in the floor. I do have one old red cock that I pulled from the OB race team and to say he's a holy terror is putting it mildly. He WILL go into an individual breeding pen next year. I can't have babies in the floor with him on the loose. He'll guard and feed his OWN babies.......but the rest just better look out. :eek: I knew he was mean, but didn't think he would be that way toward babies. I was wrong. VERY wrong. LOL
Gee.........I got long winded............bottom line is, it depends on each persons set up AND the demeanor of their birds.
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
I started doing this because I had hens that would lay their second round in the same bowl with the babies in it. They would do this even though they had an empty bowl for the second round. I lost some eggs because of this so I decided to move the youngsters to the floor. Works out great! I haven't had any instances of fighting or scalping of the babies either.

Just the way I am doing things. Not saying it is right, just right for me.

Dan
That is actually part of why I was asking. I just had a hen lay an egg in the same nest with her first baby. Though he looks cute sitting on it I figured it wasn't a good thing.
Bird nest Nest Bird Egg Straw



That and I didn't really design my first loft properly, my nest boxes stack from the floor up so a couple others on ground level are getting wanderlust. I have caught them getting in and out of their nest bowl by themselves.
 

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I never let my young birds wander the floor unless they have the ability to get off the floor (Fly). I would also never recommend putting them on the floor. They, and their parents, know when they are ready to leave the nest. In my opinion, there are just some things I do not interfere with, and flying, nesting matters are some of those things.
If they are too close to the floor to begin with in a nest box, they may be just trying to see what momma bird is doing. I would enclose the front of the nest box so squab could not get out and the bigger birds could still get in. Perhaps a sill of some sort.
 

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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
Thanks Renee, I believe it was one of your posts that I was remembering. Unfortunately since this is my first year with these birds I don't know who will be good with the babies and who won't. Though I do know I have a couple of tough little babies. One actually scared a full grown cock out of his nest box yesterday LOL!

Should I do anything about the baby in the picture with the mom laying her second round in the same spot while he still lives there.

Also wondering how did he come out that color his mom is pure white and his dad is a light blue check?
 

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I understand other people's concerns about babies on the floor as everyone has had their own experiences. I have never had trouble to date and the benefits are great. 1) No more broken eggs from careless siblings, 2) youngsters seem to mature faster and 3) youngsters are much easier to ween since they learn how to eat and drink out of the food tray and drinker by observing the adults.

I know I am the odd man out on this but it is recomended in several books I have read and it works for me...so...like all things pigeon, to each his own.

Dan
 

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Thanks Renee, I believe it was one of your posts that I was remembering. Unfortunately since this is my first year with these birds I don't know who will be good with the babies and who won't. Though I do know I have a couple of tough little babies. One actually scared a full grown cock out of his nest box yesterday LOL!

Should I do anything about the baby in the picture with the mom laying her second round in the same spot while he still lives there.

Also wondering how did he come out that color his mom is pure white and his dad is a light blue check?
I don't know how big your boxes are. Once in a while, I'll have a hen lay in the bowl where the babies are and I just put the babies in the new bowl and leave Mom alone. Of course, the box has to be big enough to hold two bowls. There's a chance that the egg will get broken if left in the same bowl with the baby. They aren't quite as careful as Dad and Mom are. LOL
 

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Discussion Starter · #15 ·
Well that's a problem, this is my floor baby and he is only 16 days old :(. I tried to stop them from building there but they are industrious little buggers, they had the nest built and an egg in it overnight!! I put a milk crate over the top of them to keep it safe. Didn't think they would like it there so much they would try to have their second round in the same exact spot!
 

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Well that's a problem, this is my floor baby and he is only 16 days old :(. I tried to stop them from building there but they are industrious little buggers, they had the nest built and an egg in it overnight!! I put a milk crate over the top of them to keep it safe. Didn't think they would like it there so much they would try to have their second round in the same exact spot!
LOL.........that's what happened to me too.............I fostered the second set of eggs. I wasn't going to let them raise another round in the floor.
 

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Here is what happened to my adventurous baby. She went to the floor and somebody else's nest box.



She is fine now and fully healed up. Obviously I locked her up along with her brother until they were wing strong to escape from my bully birds.
 

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I would never put a baby on the floor in my loft. Some of my cocks are not trustworthy. I wouldn't want them to get used to going to the floor too young, because then they would probably try to do it when I wasn't there. Don't want to come home to scalped babies. Why do you want to put them down there anyway? If you put a seed dish in the nestbox, they will learn from their parents eating from it. I wish I had a separate section, but right now I don't, so I wouldn't do it. You could also make a good sized cage,(or buy one), that you could put on the floor for them. That way they would be safe from the others. I know some people have birds that will feed every baby. That must be wonderful. Mine are not like that.
 

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Discussion Starter · #19 ·
I would never put a baby on the floor in my loft. Some of my cocks are not trustworthy. I wouldn't want them to get used to going to the floor too young, because then they would probably try to do it when I wasn't there. Don't want to come home to scalped babies. Why do you want to put them down there anyway? If you put a seed dish in the nestbox, they will learn from their parents eating from it. I wish I had a separate section, but right now I don't, so I wouldn't do it. You could also make a good sized cage,(or buy one), that you could put on the floor for them. That way they would be safe from the others. I know some people have birds that will feed every baby. That must be wonderful. Mine are not like that.
I don't WANT to put them on the floor :eek: the problem is I have individual nest boxes stacked from floor to ceiling and the ones in the bottom nest boxes are getting old enough to get out of their bowls and wander around on their own.
I do have seed dishes in the nest boxes, I put them in right after I band the babies.
 

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I know this is contradictory to what others are saying, but I have been doing this all year and have not had any problems. Like I said earlier in this thread, I even have cocks that will feed any youngster regardless of weather it is theirs or not. Perhaps it has something to do with my loft, I don't know. I got the idea from Dr. Collin Walker's book and I have not had any problems.

Now, having said that, watch me go out to the loft tomorrow to see a bunch of bleeding, beat up babies....I hope not!! :eek:

Dan
 
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