Pigeon-Talk banner
1 - 9 of 9 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
200 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I was given a pigeon with a "broken leg" tonight..turns out to be a very young bird, barely fledged. he is emaciated, and has old wounds. his leg bones do not appear to be broken, but it sticks out a horrible angle....almost as if the hip or joints are dislocated...or ligaments torn.

what can I feed this guy?! he needs to get some moisture/food asap but doesnt seem interested in anything I have. should I be giving him soft food??

I am not sure what to do about his leg. I will polysporin his scabs though.

Help!
 

Attachments

·
Registered
Joined
·
200 Posts
Discussion Starter · #2 ·
I was reading..is it Splayed Leg syndrome?...and if so can I still do something???
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
13,047 Posts
First you need to do this...

Basic LIFE SAVING steps

--------------------------------------------------------------------------------

It is vital to stabilize an ill or injured pigeon or dove as soon as possible after rescue.
Three basic steps should be followed.
HEAT, ISOLATION & HYDRATION

HEAT:
A bird must be warmed gradually to a normal body temperature and be responsive (able to swallow). It is not unusual for a baby bird presented for rehabilitation to be very cold. (If a bird is unresponsive, please seek the assistance of an experienced rehabber or avian vet immediately.)

Give the bird a quick, superficial examination. Unless there is a critical situation, e.g., (severe bleeding) all birds should be covered and placed on a heat source* (see below) for at least 20-30 minutes to bring the body temperature back to normal.

If head trauma is suspected, do not place the bird on heat.

ISOLATION:
Allow the bird to stabilize in a quite, dark, warm area.
While the bird is warming, take the opportunity to prepare any other items you may need to care for the bird, e.g., International Rehydrating Solution (recipe noted below)

A 'COLD' BIRD SHOULD NEVER BE GIVEN FLUID OR FOOD, PERIOD!!

HYDRATION:
Fluids should be given after, and ONLY AFTER, the bird has been warmed, examined for any injuries & a determination is made as to the severity of his dehydration.
All fluids should be warmed or at room temperature!

Description and degrees, of hydrated and dehydrated birds
A well hydrated bird will be very alert, have elastic skin, bright eyes, moist, plump membrane inside the mouth and well formed moist droppings.

A moderately dehydrated bird will be less than fully alert, have dry, flaky skin, dull eyes, non-formed droppings and have a sticky membrane in the mouth.

A severely dehydrated bird will be lethargic or unconscious, the skin will 'tent' when slightly pinched, have sunken eyes, dry or absent droppings and have dry membrane in the mouth.

Depending on the cause and degree of dehydration, reversing this condition can take up to 24 hours. If the bird is alert, he may be rehydrated by mouth, using an eye dropper and putting drops along his beak every few minutes, making sure the fluids are room temperature or warmed slightly. Initially, a rehydrating solution should be administered. Plain water should not be given unless nothing else is available.

If the bird is not swallowing on his own or fully alert, he must be given fluids under the skin (sub-Q method).
WARNING!! This procedure should only be performed by an experienced rehabber or vet.

Please follow these simple, basic, yet most important steps.
The cells of the body simply don't work properly when dehydrated. Absolutely no digestive processes can take place if the gut CAN'T work. Absorption will not take place, food sits in the gut, undigested, and will eventually kill the bird.

* Heat source suggestions:
Towel lined heating pad, set on low
Towel lined hot water bottle
Low wattage lamp, directing the light into the cage.

* Emergency heat source substitute:
Fill an old sock about 2/3 full of rice. Microwave the sock for a few seconds. Making sure it isn't too hot, place it around the bird.

* International Rehydrating Solution:
To a cup of warm water add a pinch of salt & sugar, mix well. Use this solution to rehydrate by mouth.

* Emergency rehydrating substitute:
Pedialyte, unflavored.

By following these basic steps you have done your best to stabilize your little feathered patient until further assistance is available.

Cindy
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
200 Posts
Discussion Starter · #5 ·
thank you!! thats exactly the problem I think.....the other injury is unrelated. I will try the support system , it seems like this fellow is about the same age too.

good news is he is eating and drank a little of the water when I brought it to his/her beak.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
13,047 Posts
That's wonderful!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,981 Posts
Looks like a bad case of splayed leg and I don't mean to discourage you, but at this age it's unlikely you can correct it. I have a young roller with a leg that was even worse than that one, not just out to the side but rotated and angled back. I tried everything to correct the leg when the problem first started (he was a single chick) but to no avail; he grew very fast and it just got worse and worse. Took him to my avian vet hoping he could brace it or something but he told me the tendons were messed up and the only solution was surgical. The youngster was at that point about four weeks old. The vet advised waiting until he was weaned because anesthesia at that young age was too risky.

This past Wednesday when Cory was two months old, he had the surgery. My vet was able to "unfreeze" the leg so it is now in the correct position under the bird. I don't know how much function he will have in that leg, but it's already much better because for the first time in his life he can stand in a normal position. I'll let you know what happens in two weeks when the brace and bandages come off.

I realize surgery isn't an option for everyone. Prior to having his surgery Cory couldn't even stand normally, so once he left the nest I continued to hobble him so he could get around the loft. After trying a variety of things, I settled on a method that gave him mobility and wasn't too restrictive. I took two plastic snap-on bands, one for each leg. I took a rubber band from the newspaper, tied a knot in the center of it to make it the right length, and attached the bands to his legs with the rubber band between them. This kept the bad leg a little closer to his body so he could stand, albeit awkwardly. Otherwise he was forced to lie on his belly.

Cory is otherwise perfectly healthy and flies well. It was sad to watch him struggle, but he managed to perch and go everyone in the loft with his hobble. He learned to eat and drink along with other youngsters his age. So if you get your little guy over his injuries he can learn to get along despite the bad leg. Is the other one normal? It appears to be from the photo.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
200 Posts
Discussion Starter · #8 ·
thank you, Birdmom...I know he a little old, but he still a chick....I am still going to attempt to brace his leg....here is the thread of my attempt http://www.pigeons.biz/forums/f6/an...-synrome-please-contact-38683.html#post409206

I have found a local vet that will see feral pigeons for free...I hope!!, and I will contact her to see what she thinks of the situation.
I think this little guy will always have a limp, but I hope he can adapt. good luck with your little cory!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,981 Posts
That looks pretty good, much better than I would have anticipated from the photo. Cory's leg was so bad I could not have placed it in that position. So I think your little one has a reasonable chance of being functional. They do learn to get along with disabilities. After all, sad though it is, you often see feral pigeons that seems to get on just fine despite missing toes.
 
1 - 9 of 9 Posts
Top