Pigeon-Talk banner
1 - 6 of 6 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
38 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hello,

We have an injured wood pigeon that has been coming to our garden to feed the last few days. It's leg looks to have been broken and re set in a bad position. We really want to catch it and help it out but I am pretty sure the vets will undoubtedly wish to put it down straight away.

There is a rescue not terrible far away but again the concern is about how it will fair in captivity in the long term. I have taken some video footage which can be viewed here: http://www.facebook.com/photo.php?v=3462110398607

If any of you have any ideas or suggestions they would be much appreciated.

Thanks

Dawn
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
221 Posts
Hello,

We have an injured wood pigeon that has been coming to our garden to feed the last few days. It's leg looks to have been broken and re set in a bad position. We really want to catch it and help it out but I am pretty sure the vets will undoubtedly wish to put it down straight away.

There is a rescue not terrible far away but again the concern is about how it will fair in captivity in the long term. I have taken some video footage which can be viewed here: http://www.facebook.com/photo.php?v=3462110398607

If any of you have any ideas or suggestions they would be much appreciated.

Thanks

Dawn
You can try to trap it with the old method of the box, take care of him/her till it heals and release it again, this if you are willing to save his/her life.

 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,144 Posts
First thing that needs to be done is to catch it.
The problem is, woodies are much more easily scared off than ferals, and are also very wary of anything new in their surroundings.
While the box trap idea is ok for ferals, I doubt a woodie would take time to check it out, and if it did & you failed, it certainly wouldnt go near again.
They are much more alert than they sometimes pretend to be.
Cant really think of a way to catch it, even with a net you wouldnt get close enough before it flew off, and it certainly wouldnt come close for you to even hand feed.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
38 Posts
Discussion Starter · #4 ·
Thanks for the replies, love the trap pic btw... :)

I realize catching it will be the first major hurdle but I want to know if anyone has dealt with one with this sort of injury. I really want to catch it and get it some help but I don't want to take it in to only have it put down because the vets can't be bothered. I have seen people say that woodies don't cope well captivity. Our last little rescue did great but perhaps she was an exception to the rule. I want to know that we are going to be able to get it help without stressing it out to only be put down.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,890 Posts
Hi Dawn, I've been floowing your posts on Fb on this as well and did actually wake up this morning thinking about your Woodie. It's been on my mind, such a hard call.

I really do find it difficult to watch a bird that's struggling that badly, but obviously they are different beings to ourselves and you have to admire how they are driven to carry on as best they can.
In saying that I do feel that if there is anything I could do to help I'd probably want to try.
As you say, Woodies aren't always good in captivity although some do survive and cope. I know Cynthia has always had Woodies in the past, not sure if she still has, but used to keep them in a more secluded aviary if they were the more stressful type.
I used to help at a sanctuary that had an aviary for unreleasable birds and when they had Woodies you had to be careful when cleaning them out to be as quick as possible and try to avoid eye contact as they did tend to flap and occasionally hurt themselves by hitting their wings against the aviary wire. However they did ok. I would think it important that they have other Woodie company though so they don't feel deprived of a natural relationship.
Squabbles was slightly younger I think and so would have coped slightly better than an older Woodie.
I don't think anyone can predict for sure what would be the outcome if you did catch this bird as they're all individual in their levels of stress. I think you've just got to make the decision to either just keep helping it by providing food and water and let things take it's course as it would if you'd not seen it. Alternatively you decide to catch it and take it to a suitably experienced vet for advice and possible surgery to amputate. The outcome would be humane at least either way.

Not much help I know.

Janet
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
38 Posts
Discussion Starter · #6 ·
Hello all,
We have the pigeon now as she was soaked all the way through and couldn't get back in to the air the other day. We are trying to find a suitable sanctuary that can help and will assist in getting it the veterinary care it needs.

Have any of you had any experience at all with a one legged pigeon or with one having a leg re-broke and set?
 
1 - 6 of 6 Posts
Top