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Discussion Starter #1
Hi everyone,

Need your invaluable input once again.

I have a blind Senegal dove, I'd say he's about a year old now? Anyway I've been trying to make his life more "normal" by getting him a companion. I got him a canary, they are fine together but of course don't interact. I found a local pet shop that sells doves but a different sort - grey with a black collar, I'm guessing these are Barbary or ringnecks. I bought a female one (at least I hope it's a female!) and kept them apart for a while, giving the new one some s76 in case it has mites or worms etc.


About a week ago I put them in Noddy's (my original blind dove) cage with a barrier in the middle. Today I removed the barrier and the new one wing slapped Noddy (not too violently) then seemed very comfortable, eating his food, drinking his water, trying to bathe etc. After a while she started making small fluttering movements with her wings and crouching and then stabbing/pecking at Noddy's face. Needless to say I freaked out and separated them!

Is this normal? Should I wait and keep trying? I am terrified of harming Noddy in any way and at the same time I know doves mate for life. Does Noddy have any chance of having a mate and living a normal life? Of course I would remove the eggs if that ever happened as crossing breeds isn't good as I've been reading. My sister said that because Noddy is blind he will always be bullied. Your thoughts and experiences are very much appreciated!
 

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Blind pigeons have been able to mate and raise chicks, and they are more aggressive than doves.

Was the new dove stabbing at Noddy's face aggressively? Or could it have been an invitation to courtship? I had two pigeons in adjacent cages that managed to bond despite the barrier, the minute they were in the same cage they mated.

Cynthia
 

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him being blind may be an issue, they can sense things are not right and then pick on the weaker bird. I think(finding a mate) may be possible with the right personality of hen or mate, you should be 100% sure it is a hen, a male may be too assertive. but how many can you try out before you find one that may be unaggessive with him.?????..it would be hard,.... I would just stick with the canary and find the new dove a mate of it's own.
 

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Discussion Starter #4
Blind pigeons have been able to mate and raise chicks, and they are more aggressive than doves.

Was the new dove stabbing at Noddy's face aggressively? Or could it have been an invitation to courtship? I had two pigeons in adjacent cages that managed to bond despite the barrier, the minute they were in the same cage they mated.

Cynthia
She was pecking at his face at first, of course my heart leaped but it didn't seem aggressive, but then after a while she seemed to get a bit territorial it seemed to me, and fluttered her wings, crouched and stabbed at him, I separated them immediately. I'm not very objective most probably and I am over protective of Noddy but I do want to give her a chance if there's a chance they can get along?
 

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Discussion Starter #5 (Edited)
him being blind may be an issue, they can sense things are not right and then pick on the weaker bird. I think(finding a mate) may be possible with the right personality of hen or mate, you should be 100% sure it is a hen, a male may be too assertive. but how many can you try out before you find one that may be unaggessive with him.?????..it would be hard,.... I would just stick with the canary and find the new dove a mate of it's own.
That's what I'm worried about, I know animals can sense weakness in others and it makes sense that birds can too. The man I got the dove from said she was a female, of course I'm not 100% sure. If she doesn't get along with Noddy I will have to take her back to the pet shop (which was awful) I want to give her a chance but I'm also terrified of hurting Noddy. I don't have many options really, I don't want a wild Senegal as they are miserable in captivity, I had a wounded one and when she healed I set her free as she seemed miserable in the cage. I do find many fallen doves in Spring but again, I feel they belong outside, free, so I was very happy when I found this one pet shop that sells doves, at least she was bred in captivity.

I can't keep more than 2 doves as we may be leaving in a year or two and I would have to find homes for them (very hard to do here). My sister can take Noddy and another but not a whole bunch of them. I just want Noddy to have as normal a life as possible. It saddens me when he coos when he hears the doves outside and he doesn't have a mate of his own.
 

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Any chance of you taking and posting a short video of the interaction between the doves. I'm not so sure that the new dove was being aggressive but rather sending a message that s/he wanted to be VERY close friends.

Terry
thats true, sometimes things look aggesive when it is only normal, and if you are over protective, could be your jumping the gun. but your there not us, so you have to asses it the only way you know how.
 

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Discussion Starter #8
Thanks for all your replies, I really appreciate all the help as I am so inexperienced.

I took the Barbary dove back to the pet shop today :(
I am very subjective when it comes to Noddy but even my husband was concerned for his safety today. The barbary dove (Daisy), didn't seem afraid of Noddy, he is very non threatening and gentle and Daisy was eating from his plates, drinking, trying to bathe, even resting in one of the seed dishes so she seemed quite unafraid of Noddy, yet a little later she sat and stabbed at him quite aggressively, I don't think it was making friends gestures, though of course I could be wrong.

It's a pity because yesterday they were nibbling at each others tails and it all looked so promising till later when she pecked him rather harshly and he seemed very intimidated (being blind he didn't know what was happening and how to avoid it poor thing).

So we're back to square one, asked the pet shop if they get younger stock, maybe a younger bird raised with Noddy would be more suited? I'm very sad to have taken Daisy back to that horrible place :(
 

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Discussion Starter #9
Any chance of you taking and posting a short video of the interaction between the doves. I'm not so sure that the new dove was being aggressive but rather sending a message that s/he wanted to be VERY close friends.

Terry
Do they stab like that trying to make friends? It was very quick stabbing, very fast indeed that you could actually miss it. I see wild doves pecking one another but gently, this seemed rather harsh, quite scary really as she bit and pecked me when I first got her and it was quite painful, I would hate to imagine how it would feel for little Noddy. I don't have a video camera so I wasn't able to tape it for you :( I wish I was more experienced with all this, I really do want to give Noddy the best life he can have. It's quite frustrating, I wish he could speak and let me know what HE wants! If she was trying to make friends like that and I misunderstood it and returned her to that horrible shop I will feel terrible...
 

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Discussion Starter #12
Are diamond doves more gentle? I'll try and find someone who sells them here, I was surprised to find the Barbary doves to be honest. The guy also had 3 fantails in a tiny cage :( Turns out Barbary doves tend to be a bit territorial.
 

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Discussion Starter #14
Thanks spirit! :) they seem like small tame doves, if I find any being sold here I will definitely give it a go! I think the Barbary was a bit big compared to Noddy, these seem small and rather meek! Thank you.
 
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