Pigeon-Talk banner
1 - 11 of 11 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
5 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I've had my ringneck dove since November and I had been feeding him the blend of dove food that the pet store that I got him from had been feeding him until just a couple months ago when I noticed weevils crawling all over the food. I have decided to now buy specific seed types in bulk and mix them myself. Does this sound like a healthy blend? I give him safflower seed, milo seed, canary grass seed, and cracked corn in his main food dish. I understand millet is fattening so I do not provide any millet in his main food dish but sometimes I give him some red spray millet in a spray millet holder. He also has some high-calcium grit in a different dish. Please share with me your thoughts, thanks
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
49 Posts
I have only had my Ringneck Doves since January this year, so just sharing my experience so far, and anyone can please chime in to improve on my remarks.

The seeds/grains you mention are suitable ones for your doves. Mine also like grey striped sunflower seed and canola/rape seed as regulars.

It is healthy to give them fruits and veggies as well so that they get more nutrients. My doves (so far) eat chopped up baby spinach leaves, cooked carrot, and apple. They wouldn't accept fruit or veggies at first, until I gave them dried fruit/veg mixes from the supermarket; now they love the fresh stuff as well.

If you can't get your doves to eat the fruit/veg, perhaps start them on a multi vitamin? But do keep persisting with offering the fruit/veg, because they might reject it a hundred times and then take to it on the 101st time. And keep trying different varieties. (Do a quick check first though, in each case, to ensure the item is non-toxic for birds.)
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
5 Posts
Discussion Starter · #3 ·
I have only had my Ringneck Doves since January this year, so just sharing my experience so far, and anyone can please chime in to improve on my remarks.

The seeds/grains you mention are suitable ones for your doves. Mine also like grey striped sunflower seed and canola/rape seed as regulars.

It is healthy to give them fruits and veggies as well so that they get more nutrients. My doves (so far) eat chopped up baby spinach leaves, cooked carrot, and apple. They wouldn't accept fruit or veggies at first, until I gave them dried fruit/veg mixes from the supermarket; now they love the fresh stuff as well.

If you can't get your doves to eat the fruit/veg, perhaps start them on a multi vitamin? But do keep persisting with offering the fruit/veg, because they might reject it a hundred times and then take to it on the 101st time. And keep trying different varieties. (Do a quick check first though, in each case, to ensure the item is non-toxic for birds.)
I'm glad you mentioned something about what to do if they won't eat vegetables because my dove is definitely one who won't eat any. I actually have tried offering my bird baby spinach leaves before however I offered it on a treat holder while it was still one intact leaf and he didn't eat any. I also tried that with a small piece of strawberry once and he still would not eat any. I don't think any pet stores near me sell finely chopped dried vegetables by themselves, only maybe in seed blends for finches or parakeets, so if I wanted to try the chopped leaves that are still fresh have you just been putting them in the main food dish?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
49 Posts
No, they wouldn't eat fruit/veg out of a feed dish for me at first, either. (They would now, but I think it's not recommended to mix the fresh with the dry food.)

The way I got it to work (as well as getting them used to the more seed-like dry chips first) was by scattering it on a plate when they are out of the cage and making it look like something I am eating myself, and including some seeds there. I also scatter it on a clean section of the cage floor, towards the end of the day so that there isn't too much mixing with their droppings. (I'm wary of the potential bacteria risk there, but I weigh up the pros and cons and give them regular probiotics to cover all bases.)

The brand of the dry fruit/veg mixes that I get from the supermarket is Trill, a reputable pet food brand that you can also get in pet stores. Some of the larger chips I do have to cut down a little smaller, but that's no drama. There are some nuts, dried herbs, and treat seeds like sunflower and sesame thrown in. Hopefully you can find something similar, as that certainly helped me a lot.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
5 Posts
Discussion Starter · #5 ·
No, they wouldn't eat fruit/veg out of a feed dish for me at first, either. (They would now, but I think it's not recommended to mix the fresh with the dry food.)

The way I got it to work (as well as getting them used to the more seed-like dry chips first) was by scattering it on a plate when they are out of the cage and making it look like something I am eating myself, and including some seeds there. I also scatter it on a clean section of the cage floor, towards the end of the day so that there isn't too much mixing with their droppings. (I'm wary of the potential bacteria risk there, but I weigh up the pros and cons and give them regular probiotics to cover all bases.)

The brand of the dry fruit/veg mixes that I get from the supermarket is Trill, a reputable pet food brand that you can also get in pet stores. Some of the larger chips I do have to cut down a little smaller, but that's no drama. There are some nuts, dried herbs, and treat seeds like sunflower and sesame thrown in. Hopefully you can find something similar, as that certainly helped me a lot.
I don't think I can get any of the Trill brand mix-ins here in the US. They are only available on websites that end in .au so I don't think I can get them from here in the states. I'll try buying human-grade dried fruits from my local store and chop them up finely for him. I forgot to mention this in my previous post but my ringneck will not eat sunflower seeds, unless maybe I served then deshelled and in tiny pieces which I've never tried before. My theory is that he doesn't like how big they are. He will devour safflower seeds and he's really been loving the cracked corn ever since I introduced it to him just a few days ago for the first time. I did just order a pound of rapeseed since you mentioned it to see if my bird likes it
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
49 Posts
Yes, it’s a bother when something good isn’t available in your part of the world.

I hoped mention of the dried Trill mixes, anyway, might be a good guide to finding something comparable in your neck of the woods. The veggie mix in particular is a nice one, including some combo of pumpkin, carrot, potato, capsicum, spinach, cabbage or celery, as well as some herbs. It is certainly handy to be able to add a variety of fruits and veggies to the daily menu in a format that is both quick and easy to dispense and won’t spoil - particularly if you’re going to be away for any length of time. And of course in your case the main, hoped-for advantage would be that your Dove will take to it better than he has to the fresh stuff (being more seed-like) - at least for starters.

I have today been in discussion with Doves Witness (a key contributor to this forum) about the dried fruit and veg component of a dove’s diet. He has alerted me to the potential for moulds or fungi to be present in dried fruits and sent a link to a study based on the US market: Fungal Presence in Selected Tree Nuts and Dried Fruits
Just so you are aware. It highlights that pineapple and papaya/pawpaw are the safest bet, and raisins the worst. But he also mentions that there are naturally anti-fungal foods you can feed your Dove to counteract the possible adverse effects of this, in case you are concerned.

I hope your Dove likes the rape seed. Incidentally, I started mine on chia seed today and they gobbled it up. Interesting, your experience with the grey-striped sunflower seed. At first, my two Doves couldn’t ingest this seed either, and I habitually removed it from their mix as a potential choke hazard. After they were treated for trichomoniasis, though (a nasty parasite they brought with them from their birth aviary, which can cause lesions on the oesophagus), they had no trouble with it. And safflower - yes, seems to be a favourite across the board.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
5 Posts
Discussion Starter · #7 ·
Yes, it’s a bother when something good isn’t available in your part of the world.

I hoped mention of the dried Trill mixes, anyway, might be a good guide to finding something comparable in your neck of the woods. The veggie mix in particular is a nice one, including some combo of pumpkin, carrot, potato, capsicum, spinach, cabbage or celery, as well as some herbs. It is certainly handy to be able to add a variety of fruits and veggies to the daily menu in a format that is both quick and easy to dispense and won’t spoil - particularly if you’re going to be away for any length of time. And of course in your case the main, hoped-for advantage would be that your Dove will take to it better than he has to the fresh stuff (being more seed-like) - at least for starters.

I have today been in discussion with Doves Witness (a key contributor to this forum) about the dried fruit and veg component of a dove’s diet. He has alerted me to the potential for moulds or fungi to be present in dried fruits and sent a link to a study based on the US market: Fungal Presence in Selected Tree Nuts and Dried Fruits
Just so you are aware. It highlights that pineapple and papaya/pawpaw are the safest bet, and raisins the worst. But he also mentions that there are naturally anti-fungal foods you can feed your Dove to counteract the possible adverse effects of this, in case you are concerned.

I hope your Dove likes the rape seed. Incidentally, I started mine on chia seed today and they gobbled it up. Interesting, your experience with the grey-striped sunflower seed. At first, my two Doves couldn’t ingest this seed either, and I habitually removed it from their mix as a potential choke hazard. After they were treated for trichomoniasis, though (a nasty parasite they brought with them from their birth aviary, which can cause lesions on the oesophagus), they had no trouble with it. And safflower - yes, seems to be a favourite across the board.
I have an update for you, the canola seed arrived today. I put some in my bird's food dish and then took the food dish out of his cage and required him to fly to me holding it so I could get a closer look at what seeds he's choosing. I definitely saw him eat some. Now looking at the food dish it appears the number of canola seeds left is like half what I put in there, so I'm happy.

I also went and bought dried human-grade fruit today for him to try. I chose dried papaya. I chopped them up very finely and put them on a shiny white plate and ate several pieces myself with him watching before offering him some to try on my finger. He ate the first piece I gave him and then continued to eat more after I offered him seconds and thirds, so again he seems to like the new food. However I am experiencing a couple problems with the papaya. Although the fruit is very dry on the outside, as soon as I cut into the chunks of papaya to chop them up they are VERY sticky and make it very hard to chop, so I already think I'm going to need to buy some sort of fast chopping kitchen gadget. On top of that, it happened several times where the little pieces of papaya got stuck around my bird's beak again because of how sticky they are. Do you have any suggestions on how to prevent this from happening?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
49 Posts
Good news on both items :) This extra variety will be welcomed by your Dove; and it's great you know now that he will eat fruit after all.

Re the papaya sticking - oh dear. (I have found that pieces of raisin sometimes stick to my birds' feet and I have had to remove them a couple of times, but I haven't seen them sticking to the bill.) I'm not sure what to recommend except to try a less sticky dried fruit - perhaps pineapple? Incidentally, the pawpaw in the mix I buy isn't sticky. Can you get a packet of dried papaya pieces made specifically for birds? - see this one (in Australia) for reference: Pet Shop Direct - Premium Bird Treats Dried Paw Paw 500g
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
906 Posts
I'd bet that the major factors in whether or not the papaya is sticky are water, and sugar. So I searched the web only to discover that it is very difficult to find full product nutrition info for dried papaya. Even where some info is provided, they conveniently fail to include the water content. I did find some brands info at myfooddata.com which includes water, sugar, and added sugar.

Some brands have half the water content, so they would be drier (and a better value nutritionally.) The fourth entry disclosed "added sugar", and yet the total sugar and calories are about the same as those where "missing data" is listed. That would appear to indicate that all of them have added sugar. These products are intended for human consumption, and I couldn't find full nutritional info for any papaya products for pets, which is a bit frustrating.

Font Rectangle Number Paper product Circle


Font Rectangle Parallel Circle Number


Product Azure Font Aqua Rectangle



Font Material property Rectangle Number Screenshot

 

·
Registered
Joined
·
5 Posts
Discussion Starter · #10 ·
I'd bet that the major factors in whether or not the papaya is sticky are water, and sugar. So I searched the web only to discover that it is very difficult to find full product nutrition info for dried papaya. Even where some info is provided, they conveniently fail to include the water content. I did find some brands info at myfooddata.com which includes water, sugar, and added sugar.

Some brands have half the water content, so they would be drier (and a better value nutritionally.) The fourth entry disclosed "added sugar", and yet the total sugar and calories are about the same as those where "missing data" is listed. That would appear to indicate that all of them have added sugar. These products are intended for human consumption, and I couldn't find full nutritional info for any papaya products for pets, which is a bit frustrating.

Today at the store I found some very thin slices of dried pineapple. I’m hoping the thin slices will have less moisture trapped inside than the larger chunks of papaya I was trying to chop.
I'd bet that the major factors in whether or not the papaya is sticky are water, and sugar. So I searched the web only to discover that it is very difficult to find full product nutrition info for dried papaya. Even where some info is provided, they conveniently fail to include the water content. I did find some brands info at myfooddata.com which includes water, sugar, and added sugar.

Some brands have half the water content, so they would be drier (and a better value nutritionally.) The fourth entry disclosed "added sugar", and yet the total sugar and calories are about the same as those where "missing data" is listed. That would appear to indicate that all of them have added sugar. These products are intended for human consumption, and I couldn't find full nutritional info for any papaya products for pets, which is a bit frustrating.

Thank you very much for doing research for me, that was unnecessary but appreciated. I found a variety of dried pineapple today with no added sugar that is not in thick chunk form but rather in thin shreds. I assumed the thinner the pieces of fruit, the less moisture is likely to be trapped inside. Hyacinth was correct about the pineapple being less sticky, it was definitely easier to handle. I was able to rip tiny pieces of dried pineapple and then shape them into tiny balls/spheres with my fingers. I then placed these in my birds food dish with his typical seed blend. He did not go for the dried pineapple right away at all, he went for his grass seed and cracked corn first which is typical. He has now flown to my head while I am writing this. I can post back in a few days to update if I ever managed to get him to eat any pineapple
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
49 Posts
Thanks for the update, and good luck with it :)

I would guess that persistence and maybe some little adjustments will likely get results. I’ve found with the birds I’ve had that they go on and off foods, appreciate variety, and like to have choice on any given day :)
 
1 - 11 of 11 Posts
Top