Pigeon-Talk banner
1 - 20 of 20 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,989 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Today I found out from a pigeon vet that its illegal in my country to rehabilitate and release feral pigeons. I live in Australia. So basically, if an Australian were to ever help a feral pigeon, they'd have to keep it as a pet in cage for the rest of its life.

I can understand this law, insofar as some birds that recover from a serious disease such as Paratyphoid will be a carrier for life, infecting many other birds it associates with. But even with that understanding, I still feel very sad. Ferals get such a rough time of it. I mean people introduced them to Australia to make the country`feel more like England'. And we've basically abandoned them here and set up laws to make their care virtually impossible. I can't even legally obtain the drugs I need to help in emergencies.

As far as I'm concerned, we're just as feral as they are, and we are a whole lot more destructive towards our environment. Poor little guys.









.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
11,336 Posts
I don't think that this has anything to do with the spread of disease. In many countries the release of sucessful non native species is illegal . Here in the UK we are not allowed to release rescued grey squirrels or muntjac deer back into the wild. I can't say that would stop me.

Dr Colin Walker is very knowledgeable about pigeon health, I refer to his book constantly.

Cynthia
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,989 Posts
Discussion Starter · #5 ·
In many countries the release of sucessful non native species is illegal . Here in the UK we are not allowed to release rescued grey squirrels or muntjac deer back into the wild. I can't say that would stop me.

I felt the same way, until I started thinking about the possibility of their being a paratyphoid outbreak in my area. If I were to successfully rescue, help, and then release pigeons with that disease, they will be carriers for life, infecting many birds that they come in contact with. For me its something to consider, but not because they are feral birds. I'd be thinking it over if they were native animals too, that could spread disease because of my efforts to help.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
20,301 Posts
Today I found out from a pigeon vet that its illegal in my country to rehabilitate and release feral pigeons. I live in Australia. So basically, if an Australian were to ever help a feral pigeon, they'd have to keep it as a pet in cage for the rest of its life.

I can understand this law, insofar as some birds that recover from a serious disease such as Paratyphoid will be a carrier for life, infecting many other birds it associates with. But even with that understanding, I still feel very sad. Ferals get such a rough time of it. I mean people introduced them to Australia to make the country`feel more like England'. And we've basically abandoned them here and set up laws to make their care virtually impossible. I can't even legally obtain the drugs I need to help in emergencies.

As far as I'm concerned, we're just as feral as they are, and we are a whole lot more destructive towards our environment. Poor little guys.



Well that is a hard one to get around, but releasing one with disease that it can spread is a no brainer there.that one would need a home, but as far as the ones with say like a broken leg or just needs some T. L .C, bye bye birdie! who's to know. ....And as far as not being able to get meds, well that feral that needed them would have just become my domestic pet named Charlie.;):) here we can order just about anything online, even things that they prescribe at the vet.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
566 Posts
I suspect you are being fed some misinformation. You should ask the vet for the citation of this law that he/she says makes the release of rehabbed ferals illegal.

Most of the states in America have similar laws which forbid the release of any wild animals without express written authority to do so. Those laws were written to prevent wholesale release of harmful and invasive species into native populations. They were not intended to address one shot rescues of species already present in the state.

Although there is much online comment about the rock dove(pigeon to us) being an invasive species in Australia, it would be silly to write a law which forbids release after rescue and rehabilitation. It would make more sense to simply forbid rescue or rehabilitation.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,989 Posts
Discussion Starter · #9 ·
For me, its useful knowing this because it could explain why I've not had much cooperation from vets with my rescued ferals. I've been like `Hi, I'm doing something totally illegal, will you help me?'. From now on if I need veterinary help I'll be a lot more discreet, and say that the birds are a newly or recently acquired pet. Maybe things will go better for my birds then, but who knows. On the other hand they may simply not be up t speed with information about birds?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
13,048 Posts
There's no reason why you can't release your pet pigeon back to your pet flock.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
4,098 Posts
That is a weird law. I understand not releasing rehab birds that can't survive the wild after injury, but not the healthy ones. Maybe it is one of those things that Australians should vote for the right people that makes these rules.

Those rescued birds came from the wild so I am thinking that after rehab they can return back where they come from. I really don't know what kind of logic those people use that made those rules. What if this was a kangaroo that was found injured? Can you not return it back in the wild after recovery?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,989 Posts
Discussion Starter · #14 ·
Hi RodSD,

The law only applies to introduced species such as cats, dogs, foxes, feral pigeons, sparrows, & rabbits. For all I know the one law is meant to cover all situations, such as deterring people from trying to dump kittens into the wild (which is huge problem in Australia).

Its ok to release native fauna and birds back into the wild though.

I dunno, I can think of a lot of situations where laws like these should be understood, respected, and then discarded because they are inhumane to the individual animal involved.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
566 Posts
Well Bella, here is the problem.

Many times people like to talk about law as though they know something about it. The beauty of the law is that it is written so that anybody can read it themselves.

Why don't you ask all of these people for the citation to the law they quote to you so you and I can also read it?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,989 Posts
Discussion Starter · #16 ·
I suppose I could, but I feel that it would be obnoxious, in light of the fact that I was asking Dr Collin Walker for much needed help. The actual legal citations involved would mean little to me; what does matter to me is that vets possess the perception that its illegal to rehabilitate feral animals, and I have to therefore change my approach when I require help.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
566 Posts
Nobody is suggesting that you have to challenge your vet with a request that he put up or shut up.
All that needs to be said is that you would like to post the law on the pigeon forum for all of the members to read and where can you find it?
I am certain a polite request for more information would be taken in the same manner it is offered.

And if I understood your previous postings correctly you say that you have spoken to others who confirm this. Perhaps one of them might know.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,989 Posts
Discussion Starter · #19 ·
Hi Cindy & Grimaldy,

Researching the law on my own proved to be a difficult task. It seems that Feral pigeons are regarded as both pest species AND feral species in Australia, so many different sets of Australian laws can be applied at the federal, state, and local government level.

The main Federal law involved is the`The Environment Protection and Biodiversity Conservation Act 1999' , but laws surrounding the treatment of pests are governed by the local councils. Each state in Australia has multiple laws which can also be applied to feral animals.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
566 Posts
Hi B.

Australia has a very different legal system than America, or England for that matter.

It is most probable that the law is found in an administrative ruling or regulation from some administrative agency of the federal government. Trying to get into them can be quite a chore unless you know how to find it.

Your best best is to ask the people who tell you about it.
 
1 - 20 of 20 Posts
This is an older thread, you may not receive a response, and could be reviving an old thread. Please consider creating a new thread.
Top