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Hi, welcome to PT and thanks for helping him.

As he hit against your window he could maybe suffer from a head trauma (in addition to canker), that could explain the inability to fly.
Here are two links about concussion in birds and a general one about head trauma in pets, you can find there many useful info:




Regarding head trauma, the best thing is keeping him in a comfortable place, in a soft light (birds who suffer from a head trauma are very photo-sensitive), in a quiet and cool room (it's very important to not keeping birds suffering from a concussion on a hot waterbottle or a heatpad because warmth could make the situation worse). He needs rest. Try to avoid any fright or source of excitement, etc because that could increase blood pressure and so brain swelling.

I was wondering if the bleeding is somehow related to the blow. Did you see the blood inside his mouth shortly after the collision? Or the following morning (I hope that he does not have any internal injuries because in that case there is nothing you can do)? Maybe the blow dislodged a piece of the canker growths? The blood looked dry or fresh? Have you noticed if the mouth mucosa looked pale or pink as usual?
I would give him a complete vitamin supplement containing iron and even B-complex vitamins, it will help him to replace the lost red cells. You can show him water by dipping his beak (not over the nostrils) into a small bowl of water.
Have you checked his mouth again? Do you think he is able to swallow? If yes, as I suppose it's been hours since you saw the bleeding I would try to leave available a bowl filled with small seeds (avoid all sharpened seeds) and see if he is able to eat them on his own.

I'm used to treat canker with spartrix (carnidazole). I'm also used to apply topically Betadine but in this case I would not do that (because of the previous bleeding).

Keep us updated.
 

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Thanks for the update.

How is he doing today?

So maybe the bleeding was related to the collision (I'm just guessing, maybe a small capillary got broken and, as you said, the clot got knocked while you were checking him). Blood has a ferrous/iron smell. You noticed a smell: did that smell seemed blood smell? Canker and yeasts have too a bad smell so it would be helpful to identify the source/nature of the smell (I know, it's not easy...).

I would carefully check again his throat. If there is a pea or some "dirtiness" stuck in the throat you could try to gently remove it with a wet q-tip (the smallest that you can find). Of course, it will be better if someone could help you.

I attach a link, give it a look, it could help you to understand if there is something wrong into his throat (like a swelling, etc):


If you can get a vitamin supplement containing iron and B-complex he will surely benefit from it.

In case you can get some spartrix you could give him a tablet (as you suspected canker when you first checked him). Just in case... Spartrix is very safe for birds.

Keep us updated.
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Thanks for the update. I hope that he will make a full recovery and that he will come back to the garden soon 🤞!

You could try to ask to the rehabber to explain you how to care about a bird with very severe canker. If you have some free time maybe they could show something (like how to tube feed, etc.).
Here is a link with helpful info (maybe you have already read it):


Regarding medications, when the bird is able to swallow I cut the spartrix tablet into 4 pieces and I give a quarter of a tablet one at a time (I always check the mouth/throat before giving the other piece because I want to be sure that the bird swallowed the previous one). When the bird can't swallow I crumble each piece into several small fragments, then I put one fragment at a time into the mouth. Sometimes I take a wet q-tip and I dab the fragment near the canker until it becomes a "mush" and the bird is able to swallow it. I learned about direct contact of spartrix with canker from one of our members (but he talked about a different method, he suggested to make a paste and to dab it directly on canker). I think that direct contact helps.
In other cases, I push the fragment down with a q-tip. I decide on case-by-case basis.
I'm also used to topically apply Betadine 10% (povidone iodine), I find that very helpful because it helps to dry the canker. I explained everything about that method here (post. # 11).


In 2017 my pigeon Caterina got a terrible yeast infection and she had great difficulties in swallowing: I had to feed her small amount of bird formula in a super slow way. I mean, I gave her a very small amount of formula by syringe, I gave her time to swallow it then another bit of formula and so on (same thing for nystatin). I literally spent my whole days (from morning to night) caring about her. Each syringe took a lot of time.
I cared about some pigeons who had bad canker (I called one of them Cheddar... A friend suggested the name, guess why 😉😝). In some cases I had to feed (for some days) a small seed one at a time (I gently pushed them down with a q-tip)... I had to choose the safer ones (rounded and small... Like red dari for example), I counted them so I could get an idea of how much they were eating... It took a very long time but that kept them alive until the meds started to work.

Anyway, keep us updated!
 

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Yes, ronidazole is for canker but I have never used it (years ago the vet gave me dimetridanazole but honestly I didn't like it).


Also I have never heard of that "combination product" (nystatin plus ronidazole).

In France it is needed a prescription for buying nystatin (I think even in Italy but I'm not sure) so I don't know if you can order it online from these countries.
I don't know if that could help but maybe you could try to give a look at these websites:



Anyway, keep us updated!
 

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Thanks for the update.

Glad to hear that he recovered from canker 👍.

Agree, I would keep him for a while and see how he is doing. Before releasing him you must be sure that he is able to fly in an excellent way (because he will have to escape from predators, avoid cars and so on).

Keep us updated!
 

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Yes, a droopy wing could also be from an illness but probably, as he crashed against your window, he injured himself. Maybe a dislocation.
Last September we rescued a pigeon attacked by a predator, she had a broken leg and a even a broken wing. We had to keep her into a small box for a month because she had to rest her leg (the vet put a bandage) and wing. Now she is able to fly but not in a good way and also has a droopy wing (she limps too). I think that she would not be able to survive in the wild so we adopted her. I attach a pic so you can see the droopy wing.

Anyway, as I suppose that he was kept into a small cage when he was at the rescue center and that he rested his wing for a few weeks I would not stress him today. Tomorrow the vet will visit him and suggest you the best thing to do. Maybe you could ask to the vet to do some tests (if he does tests). Just to be sure.

My birds eat throughout the day... But I don't have any experience with wood pigeons so honestly I can't give you an opinion...
 

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Thanks for the update!

I'm very glad to hear that he is now a strong flier!
You are right, it's very nice to know that he eats at the same time as his parent!

Keep us updated!
 

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Thanks for the update! Good job 😊!

I hope that you really saw him! That would be nice!
Maybe when he will feel more confident he will start to regularly attend your garden! And maybe he will bring there even his/her future mate!
 
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