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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
How important is it to train old birds on the line of flight? Reason is this Saturday morning I have to go out of town which will be straight North instead of NE my line of flight. The distance will be 65 miles, they have already been 45 miles on the line of flight last weekend. Thanks:)
 

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Sounds like a good training run to me. This way if they get off a little to the west during race time, they will see things they saw before. But then, How do they do it the first time? The world may never know.

Tony
 

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Well here's a thought. Your birds are homers. They should home once they are settled and have routed. So it shouldn't matter.

That said one guy in our club had his best year training off the line of flight. The line was south east and he trained due west. He was always in the top 5 for the club and top 10% for the combine. He's the one who started me thinking that maybe we make too much of the line of flight. But then folks have been training to line of flight for years.
 

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It doesn't really matter with old birds. I always try to toss my old birds where they have to home in a head wind. Tail wind tosses are a waste of time and gas.
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
Thanks everyone, I didn't feel like direction should matter with old birds but my friend/mentor believes in only the line of flight!!!:rolleyes: I've already told him after this year I'll give him winning tips next year:D
 

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It's fine, usually the training is just for their fitness. A guy here who has won the most 600's ever in our state trains his obs around the clock to get them thinking all the time because for distances races more than not birds will get off course and have to find their way back anyways.
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
Well, all birds were in the loft when I got home this afternoon. My friend/mentor told me I'd probably lose half of them:D I wish my module would have been in the clock to see how long it took them
 

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It's just mainly at first when I think you should train in the direction of the races. Once they get that figured out, you can let them out in any direction in my opinion, it's just fitness and exercise that you need them to do.
 

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Just my opinion. Any distance is good for the wing. But when your on the line of flight. Its good for the races. They will know that route when it comes to the races.
 

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Just my opinion. Any distance is good for the wing. But when your on the line of flight. Its good for the races. They will know that route when it comes to the races.
Yeah I agree, This applies the same when it comes to the birds going off track, If you never train off the line of flight they may veer off track and get lost if they have never learnt not to rely on the same landmarks every toss.
 

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How important is it to train old birds on the line of flight? Reason is this Saturday morning I have to go out of town which will be straight North instead of NE my line of flight. The distance will be 65 miles, they have already been 45 miles on the line of flight last weekend. Thanks:)

I guess I might be in the minority, because I don't think one has to "train" a pigeon to find home, that comes quite naturally. My 1st training toss for a pair of late hatches the other year was 192 miles, and it was not a problem. The whole purpose for training along the line of flight, IMHO, is #1 conditioning and #2 to get them to "break" for home, and indeed race home. I have no idea if this works in practice, except for the one show which aired on TV which showed a pigeon taking a more direct route after being released a number of times from a location.

If you happen to guess right as to where a portion of the flock might fly near some 50-60 miles from your loft, the thinking is that repeated releases from that location, may cause they to "break" from the flock, with them thinking...hey I know where I am now, and just taking off from the flock like a bee...and high tailing it home. That is at least the theory behind training along the flight path. That and they might just break at the release point, heading in the direction towards home, because that is always the direction they head. Have no idea if this type of training has any bearing on their performance. And never took the time to reinvent training, or do a scientific study on the matter so pretty much just went along with the concept of training along flight path as the guys who were doing well in the combine were doing that.
 

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Yeah I agree, This applies the same when it comes to the birds going off track, If you never train off the line of flight they may veer off track and get lost if they have never learnt not to rely on the same landmarks every toss.
What do they do when they are released from a location which they have never seen before and thus have no landmarks to use as reference ?
 

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They make it home, but not in record time do they?
I don't know, because as a YB specialist, all of my record times at the longer race stations, were accomplished under race conditions on the 1st and only release from that location. So the bird never had an opportunity to race again from that location to determine if he would "Speed Up" as the result of having been raced from there before, and presumably benefiting from familiar landmarks to race home by.

The evidence would suggest that multiple releases from the same release point, as in say a 55 mile training toss. Can increase their speed, by developing a more direct route. Which is why we train along what we perceive as the flight path. So when your bird is in a flock of pigeons an hour or so away, he has been there 50 times before, so simply "breaks" for home, and makes a bee line right to the landing board.

But, your one post suggested training off the flight path in case the flock becomes lost, they will come across a previous training area, and thus find their way home. Since the release point could be hundreds of miles from the last "off the line of flight" training toss. I tend to view it's training value as negligible. However, I don't see how it could really hurt either. Given a choice between just a few training tosses along the line of flight, or a much greater number of training tosses from a greater variety of locations, I think I would lean towards the latter. After all, I don't think the "perfect" training system has been invented yet.

Well, that is the theory anyway, at least inside my head.
 

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I think there's a huge difference in training your birds to "memorize" their way home as opposed to "teaching" them the way home.
 

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Temperature on the Race Day...

..i think can influence their line of flight. some old timers here in San Diego are saying that when temperature goes up during the race day the birds seem to fly close to the coast for cooler temperature. and most lofts that are close to the coast gain more race points as a result.






kalapati
San Diego

http://blubarloft.dyndns.biz:81/jview.htm
 
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